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Heartsease (Puffin Books) [Paperback]

Peter Dickinson , Robert Hales
3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)

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Book Description

30 Sep 1971 Puffin Books
When an American spy comes to investigate the uncanny "changes" which have made the people of England revert to a medieval machineless state, he is declared a witch and stoned, until two children risk their lives to save him.

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Heartsease (Puffin Books) + The Weathermonger (The Changes Trilogy, Book 1)
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Product details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Puffin Books; New edition edition (30 Sep 1971)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140304983
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140304985
  • Product Dimensions: 17.6 x 11.2 x 1.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 735,989 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Peter Dickinson was born in 1927 in Livingstone, Northern Rhodesia (now Zambia) the second son of British colonial civil servant and a South African farmer's daughter. The family returned to England in 1935, but his father died suddenly in the same year. He was educated at Eton College and was researching for a PhD in King's College, Cambridge,when in 1952 he was offered a offered a job on the editorial staff of Punch magazine, where he stayed until l969.

In 1968 he published his first two books, a crime novel, Skin Deep (aka The Glass-sided Ants' Nest) and a children's adventure story, The Weathermonger. Since then he has published about 50 books in both genres , and has been translated into many languages. He has won a number of prizes and awards (see Bibliographies for details.)

He has been chairman of the Society of Authors and is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature. He was awarded and OBE for services to literature in 2009.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars Sequel to "The Weathermonger" 5 Aug 2014
By Marshall Lord TOP 500 REVIEWER
Format:Paperback
"Heartsease" by Peter Dickinson is the second in the "Changes" trilogy which were published in the following order:

1) "The Weathermonger (The Changes Trilogy, Book 1)"
2) This book, "Heartsease"
3) "The Devil's Children (Changes Trilogy)."

The series has also been published as one volume. (Link: The Changes: A Trilogy).

The stories can be read in the order they were published, but I understand that the order in which they books came out does not correspond to the sequence of events, and a reader who wanted to follow the events in chronological order should probably read the first book published, "The Weathermonger," last.

The story is set in West Country England in a time which when the trilogy was published (the late 1960s) was the near future. A note by the author describes the geographical setting as being between Gloucester and Bristol, with the slight change that he put a smaller village of about 700 people in the place which in the real world is occupied by the village of Painswick. And in the story Gloucester and Bristol are dead, abandoned cities: people had moved out because in the absence of technology cities that size cannot exist.

The first novel, "The Weathermonger" describes the society which resulted after almost everyone on mainland Britain suddenly turned against all kinds of machines - not just nuclear reactors but tractors, buses, central heating, electric stoves or razors.
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3.0 out of 5 stars a bit disappointing 26 July 2012
By John Hopper TOP 1000 REVIEWER VINE VOICE
Format:Mass Market Paperback
This continuation of The Changes Trilogy, in an England where the population has turned against all technology and leads a Medieval-style rural life, centres on a completely different set of characters to the first novel. The plot is fairly straightforward, around smuggling out a rescued "witch" on a tugboat, but mostly for me lacked excitement or particularly interesting characters. 3/5
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.5 out of 5 stars  2 reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars An American agent is trapped in a Britain which has turned against technology 18 Aug 2014
By Marshall Lord - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
"Heartsease" by Peter Dickinson is the second in the "Changes" trilogy which were published in the following order:

1) "The Weathermonger (The Changes Trilogy, Book 1)"
2) This book, "Heartsease"
3) "The Devil's Children (Changes Trilogy)."

The series has also been published as one volume. (Link: The Changes: A Trilogy).

The stories can be read in the order they were published, but I understand that the order in which they books came out does not correspond to the sequence of events, and a reader who wanted to follow the events in chronological order should probably read the first book published, "The Weathermonger," last.

The story is set in West Country England in a time which when the trilogy was published (the late 1960s) was the near future. A note by the author describes the geographical setting as being between Gloucester and Bristol, with the slight change that he put a smaller village of about 700 people in the place which in the real world is occupied by the village of Painswick. And in the story Gloucester and Bristol are dead, abandoned cities: people had moved out because in the absence of technology cities that size cannot exist.

The first novel, "The Weathermonger" describes the society which resulted after almost everyone on mainland Britain suddenly turned against all kinds of machines - not just nuclear reactors but tractors, buses, central heating, electric stoves or razors. Anyone who tries to use a machine is called a witch, and killed, usually by burning, stoning, or drowning.

"Heartsease" is set five years after the change. At the start of the book two of the children from the first story, Jonathon and Margaret, who are now fourteen, rescue a "witch" who had been stoned and left for dead.

When he has sufficiently recovered from his injuries to speak, the "witch" tells them that he is called Otto and is an American agent come to find out what has happened in Britain.

And so begins an adventure as the children try to get Otto safely home ...

This is a reasonably well-crafted, entertaining story which is aimed at children but can be read by adults. The three stories in the trilogy can be read together but each is sufficiently self-contained that they do not have to be.
2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Classic fantasy suitable for all ages 8 Aug 1997
By danz@innocent.com - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
Heartsease continues The Changes Trilogy, Margaret and Jonathan are still traped in a modern-medevil England in which the populace is irrationally afraid of technology. They must survive to find a solution to possibly restore the island to its proper form
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