Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 

Head First [Original recording reissued, Original recording remastered]

Badfinger Audio CD
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)

Available from these sellers.



Amazon's Badfinger Store

Music

Image of album by Badfinger

Photos

Image of Badfinger
Visit Amazon's Badfinger Store
for 38 albums, 5 photos, discussions, and more.

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product details

  • Audio CD (23 Sep 2002)
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Format: Original recording reissued, Original recording remastered
  • Label: Recall
  • ASIN: B000060KA9
  • Other Editions: Audio CD
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 412,905 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Disc: 1
1. Lay Me Down
2. Hey, Mr Manager
3. Keep Believing
4. Passed Fast
5. Rock 'N' Roll Contract
6. Saville Row
7. Moonshine
8. Back Again
9. Turn Around
10. Rockin' Machine
Disc: 2
1. Time Is Mine
2. Smokin' Gun
3. Old Fashioned Notions
4. Nothing To Show
5. You Ask Yourself Why
6. Keep Your Country Tidy
7. To Say Goodye
8. Queen Of Darkness
9. I Can't Believe In
10. Thanks To You All
See all 11 tracks on this disc

Customer Reviews

4 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
4.0 out of 5 stars
4.0 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Well worth the wait! 13 Dec 2000
Format:Audio CD
'Head First' was recorded hastily, shortly after the completion of their brilliant 'Wish You Were Here' album, at a time when the band's career was in a state of real turmoil. Faced with legal problems and gross mismanagement, guitarist Joey Molland had left the group to be replaced by keyboard player, Bob Jackson and Pete Ham would soon take his own life. The resulting album has taken a quarter of a century to see its official release, and believe me, it has been well worth the wait. Pete Ham weighs in with two fine numbers, the pop rocker 'Lay Me Down' and ballad 'Keep Believing'. Tom Evans' powerful and vitriolic 'Hey Mr Manager' and 'Rock and Roll Contract' say much about his feelings towards Badfinger's management at the time. Mike Gibbins co-wrote the lovely 'Moonshine' keeping up the high quality of his contributions to Badfinger's albums over the years. Bob Jackson's efforts' 'Turn Around' and 'Passed Fast'(co-written with Tom Evans),add a heavier dimension to the proceedings. The band's playing throughout is superb! My only criticism of 'Head First' is its relatively short running time, though this is more than compensated by the inclusion of a bonus disc of demos recorded at the time. 'Head First' is an absolute must for lovers of this under-rated band!
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars No Matter What. 28 Nov 2012
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
This album is a sure indicatator that the business pressures and disappointments are taking their toll on the band, especially Pete Ham. To me the CD lacks the verve of their earlier work (No Dice, Straight Up), it could be any old band churning out songs to fill up this disc.

There is a distinct lack of melody in many of the songs and the arrangements lack the flair of earlier releases, of course there are a few lovely tracks but not enough.

It is sad to think that Badfinger's last release would be so lack lustre but at least their first three albums were magnificent.

For completists only.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.4 out of 5 stars  21 reviews
18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Worth Buying--But Pete Ham's CDs Are Better 9 Sep 2002
By M. Hummel - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
Headfirst, Badfinger's last studio album is worth buying as part documentary evidence of its demise, part musical value. That having been said, however, I think the band was in sharp decline musically at the time this was recorded--of course this was brought on by their wretched emotional state in reaction to their exploitive contractual situation. Anyone who buys this album will want to buy the book "Without You," which documents the band's tragedy and serves as a warning to any aspiring musician.
I highly recommend that you buy Golder's Green and 7 Park Avenue, the two posthomous collections of band leader Pete Ham's home recordings. Ham, apparently, was strongly committed to the band and its democratic structure, but when one compares Ham's output to the rest of the band, it seems they both made a big mistake thinking Ham was anything other than a superior talent who should have had at least half of each album reserved for his songs. Ham's work is more melodic, more rhythmic, better lyrically, and he flat out sings circles around his mates. Badfinger soared in direct proportion to the number of Ham compositions on each album, in my opinion. Apparently, Ham was often frustrated when his mates rejected numerous of his songs. Hard to figure.
Head First's Ham compositions (especially Lay Me Down, Smokin' Gun, Nothing To Show, and Keep Your Country Tidy) are the main highlights. although "Rockin' Machine" on the first CD is charming, and some of the demos on the second CD are actually better unfinished--sometimes the band overwhelmed the gentler material by going a little too heavy. I really think that the other members besides Ham were bottoming out creatively when this was made, a trend that one could see through the band's history. Ham was the man, if only he had known it.
The purported single attempt, Lay Me Down, is better in demo form, I think, on the second CD.
I'd also buy Badfinger's Greatest Hits, if I were you. It has all the hits, the best of Pete, and the better songs by the others. Long Live Pete Ham.
14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars This Is a Must for Die Hard Fans 30 Jan 2001
By Steve Vrana - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Longtime fans of Badfinger have been waiting twenty-five years for the release of this album. And as long as you aren't expecting another Straight Up or No Dice and accept this for what it is, you won't be disappointed. What you are getting is a rough-mix version of what was to be their follow-up to the critically acclaimed Wish You Were Here. It would have been their fourth album in sixteen months! But I'm guessing that if you're reading this, you're familiar with the tragic details that kept Warner Brothers from releasing this album. So let's get to the music.
The ten tracks that make up disc one clocks in at 33:38; the demo disc is a mere 26:53. But for any serious Badfinger fan, you need this if only to confirm what Badfinger was still capable of doing musically.
The four strongest tracks on disc one are the four that Rhino was able to get from Warner Brothers when they released Badfinger's Best Of, Vol. II in 1990 featuring their WB catalog. [That album is still worth getting if only to hear the master tape versions of these songs, instead of Mike Gibbins' tape copy.]
"Lay Me Down" - This is Pete Ham at his power pop best. This could have been a huge single for them. [The solo demo at the end of disc two is a very early version where Ham hasn't worked out all the lyrics yet.]
"Keep Believing" - This is Ham's message to recently departed bandmate Joey Molland and shows the cynicism that was creeping into Ham's lyrics. Ham had tried to maintain his optimism, but certainly was realizing how the band had been manipulated.
"Passed Fast" - Co-written by Tom Evans and new member Bob Jackson. A mid-tempo rocker that features a nice guitar part by Ham on the coda.
"Moonshine" - A lovely ballad sung by Tom and Bob (who co-wrote the song with Mike Gibbins). Again, nice guitar work by Ham.
These four songs serve as a reminder of just what a terrific band Badfinger was. The only other tracks that really meet the high standards set by the band's previous work are a couple of numbers by Gibbins--the acoustic guitar ballad "Back Again" features Mike's slightly raspy vocal to nice effect, and "Rockin' Machine," which despite its title is a country/honky-tonk ditty that runs a brief minute and thirty seconds. The two Tom Evans' songs, "Hey, Mr. Manager" and "Rock'n'Roll Contract," may have been therapeutic, but they are both a bit pedestrian and the constant grumbling about how management jerked them around wears thin. [If ever a band had a right to be angry, it was Badfinger. But how many times do you want to hear about it?] "Saville Row" is a 30-second synthesizer snippet by Pete Ham. I'm not sure why this made it onto the first disc--or at all, for that matter. It's nothing memorable. The final track is Bob Jackson's "Turn Around" and it's the least Badfinger-sounding track on either disc. It's a weak attempt at a hard rock sound.
Disc two is a mixed bag. These are all demos featuring only acoustic guitar accompaniment or piano in the case of the Gibbins' demo "Old Fashioned Notions." Of special interest are the six Pete Ham demos. "Time Is Mine" doesn't even have lyrics yet, so Pete just doo-doo-doos the vocal part. "Smoking Gun" features a rather bizzaro "Rocky Racoon"-style lyric. "Nothing To Show" is a rocker that shows Pete's optimism giving in to hopelessness. (All three clock in at under two minutes each.) "I Can't Believe In" is equally pessimistic. (Listen close to this one and you hear a dog bark in the background.) "Keep Your Country Tidy" is an upbeat ballad with a lovely melody. Gibbins' trio of "Old Fashioned Notions," "You Ask Yourself Why" and "Thanks To You All" show him to be the band's least appreciated songwriter. Evans' "Queen of Darkness" contains another bitter lyric, but Jackson's "To Say Goodbye" has a pretty melody.
In the end you get sixty minutes of rough mixes and demos from a band that under different circumstances would have built on its early commercial success and vaulted into superstar status. Instead, it serves as an epitaph for one of the best bands in pop history. This is not for the casual fan. But if you already own their other albums, you'll need this one too. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Head First - Badfinger's Last Masterpiece Released! 15 Nov 2000
By Morten Vindberg - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
The recordings for Badfinger's third Warner album began at the end of November 1974. You would expect the members of the band at this point to be totally exhausted from touring, financial worries, commercial and the departure of Molland; and of course they were.Never the less they were still convinced that they could/had to work their way out of their crisis. For their latest British tour they had recruited Bob Jackson (keyb.), because of a short departure of Pete Ham. This tour had been as a 5-piece and by the end of the tour Molland had left the band. Two you producers were found for the new album; Kenny Kerner and Ritchie Wise - before Badfinger they had produced The Stories.
New songs did not come easily to Pete at this point; he was losing faith in the the whole thing, but he worked hard to come up with more quality material. Of his three contributions for Head First the two of them are among his best ever. The opener "Lay Me Down" is a very catchy and powerful rocker with great commercial potential. "Keep Believing" was written to Joey Molland and it's a typical Ham ballad; a very beautiful melody. Pete's third track is a short instrumental called "Saville Row". Tom Evans is back as a very important songwriter on the album. He's written two songs alone and two songs in collaboration with with Mike and Mike/Bob. The first two are angry comments to the music business; both of them very intense; especially Mr. Manager is bound to become an all-time Badfinger favourite. Rock'n Roll Contract was rerecorded for Say No More, but this version is much better - I love the middle part. Passed Fast and Moonshine are well-known from Best of Badfinger Vol 2 - both of them very strong and indicating that this new line-up might have become their most interesting ever. Bob Jackson demonstrates powerful vocals and songwriting abilities on Turn Around; a track that could have been written and sung by Steve Winwood. Mike wrote Back Again and Rocking Machine. Back Again is close to My Heart Goes Out in style and feeling - perhaps even better. Rocking Machine though it sounds a bit unfinished is a charming little tune; I think Mike sounds a lot like George Harrison.
All in all the band play and sing their best on this album that is among Badfinger's strongest - perhaps the best. Pete Ham does not sound burdened by having to play all guitars and they all appear extraordinary inspired.
Forbidden Records had originally planned to release the album in April 1999, but there were complications and delays. Forbidden Records did not possess the original master-tapes but a 4-track reference master copy. The original master-tapes which have been considered lost seem to have been rediscovered in the vaults of Warner Brothers. This means that they may release the album some time in the future. or maybe license it to another label. Until that may happen luckily we have this Snapper release remastered from Mike Gibbin's tape copy of the original Apple mixes.
The bonus tracks are all great songs; some are them are at an early stage and the sound quality is not very good on most of them. Still it's always nice to hear new songs by Pete Ham. I believe his 4 new songs here could have been developed into great Badfinger tracks. Of the other songs I especially like Mike's You Ask Yourself Why
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Head First Finally Released 11 Feb 2004
By Morten Vindberg - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
This was supposed to be Badfinger's 3rd album, but several reasons it was not released until year 2000. But well worth waiting for.
The recordings for Badfinger's third Warner album began at the end of November 1974. You would expect the members of the band at this point to be totally exhausted from touring, financial worries and the departure of Molland; and of course they were. Never the less they were still convinced that they could/had to work their way out of their crisis. For their latest British tour they had recruited Bob Jackson (keyb.), because of a short departure of Pete Ham. This tour had been as a 5-piece and by the end of the tour Molland had left the band. Two you producers were found for the new album; Kenny Kerner and Ritchie Wise - before Badfinger they had produced The Stories.
New songs did not come easily to Pete Ham at this point; he was losing faith in the the whole thing, but he worked hard to come up with more quality material. Of his three contributions for Head First the two of them are among his best ever. The opener "Lay Me Down" is a very catchy and powerful rocker with great commercial potential. "Keep Believing" is a typical Ham ballad; a very beautiful melody. Pete's third track is a short instrumental called "Saville Row". Tom Evans is back as a very important songwriter on the album. He'd written two songs alone and two songs in collaboration with with Mike and Mike/Bob. The first two are angry comments to the music business; both of them very intense; especially Mr. Manager is bound to become an all-time Badfinger favourite. Rock'n Roll Contract was rerecorded for Say No More, but this version is much better - I love the middle part. Passed Fast and Moonshine are well-known from Best of Badfinger Vol 2 - both of them very strong and indicating that this new line-up might have become their most interesting ever. Bob Jackson demonstrates powerful vocals and songwriting abilities on Turn Around; a track that could have been written and sung by Steve Winwood. Mike wrote Back Again and Rocking Machine. Rocking Machine is a charming little tune; I think Mike sounds a lot like George Harrison.
All in all the band play and sing their best on this album that is among Badfinger's strongest. Pete Ham does not sound burdened by having to play all guitars and they all appear extraordinary inspired.
The original master-tapes which have been considered lost seem to have been rediscovered in the vaults of Warner Brothers. This means that they may release the album some time in the future. or maybe license it to another label. Until that may happen luckily we have this Snapper release remastered from Bob Jackson's tape copy of the original Apple mixes.
The bonus tracks are all great songs; some are them are at an early stage and the sound quality is not very good on most of them. Still it's always nice to hear new songs by Pete Ham. I believe his 4 new songs here could have been developed into great Badfinger tracks. "I Can't Believe In" and "Keep Your Country Tidy" are great tunes. Of the other songs I especially like Mike's You Ask Yourself Why
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Shouldve been one disc (hence the 4 stars) 24 Mar 2004
By CJ Costa Rica - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
The final Badfinger album with Pete Ham is very good. Trying to keep the Wish You Were Here (or as Mike Gibbins called it in the Gary Katz documentary "Wish You Were Where?"). Pete's demo of Lay Me Down is in G, while the offical version is in E. These Apple mixes mixed on Dec 15, 1974 are far better than Warner's mixes produced in Feb 75. The Warner mix of Lay Me Down is in mono and has a tape fault right at the start of the song (although if you have the cassette version of The Best of Volume 2, you can somehow get rid of it by playing it a lot like I did before I got the cd). Rock And Roll Contract shouldve had the little speech more upfront (maybe it was in the Warner mix?). Most of the bonus demos werent recorded during that time (as Mike said in a Dan Matovina interview). Keep Your Country Tidy has a bit of Lay Me Down although Pete didnt know it at the time. Anyway, get this disc now! I found it at Circuit City for 18 bucks and i know ill never see that price again, but do compare prices at all the shops. I never pay more than 20 bucks for a double disc set and neither should you!
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for similar items by category


Feedback