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Haydn : The Seven Last Words Of Christ On The Cross
 
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Haydn : The Seven Last Words Of Christ On The Cross

26 Jun. 2007 | Format: MP3

£3.49 (VAT included if applicable)
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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
5:58
30
2
7:06
30
3
6:59
30
4
8:06
30
5
6:27
30
6
4:05
30
7
7:52
30
8
7:08
30
9
6:37
30
10
1:51
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 1 Mar. 1992
  • Release Date: 26 Jun. 2007
  • Label: Warner Classics International
  • Copyright: 1992 Teldec Classics International GMBH
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:02:09
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001F5HKQG
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 51,823 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Ralph Moore TOP 50 REVIEWER on 10 Sept. 2011
Format: Audio CD
Reading a decidedly lukewarm review of this recording by a reviewer whose opinions I often read and respect sent me back to it for another listen as I had always enjoyed it very much and was rather surprised by his objections.

In the end it is a question of one's taste and response to the scale and overt emotionality of Harnoncourt's interpretation. The reviewer's preferred version by Nicol Matt, available cheaply on Brilliant, is on the face of it similar in that it uses the oratorio version with four soloists, a choir and an orchestra. I enjoy this wonderfully profound music in any of its incarnations, from the solo keyboard arrangement, through string quartet, to full orchestra, to the one we have here and they all enjoyed Haydn's approval.

There is no doubt that Harnoncourt sets out to give us an unabashedly "Romantic" account, leaning heavily on accents and emphasising the suffering behind the text whereas the Stemra disc with Matt conducting is a much more restrained, some would say refined, and redolent of a smaller-scale enterprise with a more intimate acoustic and a somewhat more claustrophobic atmosphere. While Matt's soloists may be "unknowns" they are very good, even if the bass is rather growly compared with Robert Holl's more rotund tones for Harnoncourt and Anthony Rolfe-Johnson's plaintive and intrinsically lovely tenor is clearly a superior instrument to Matt's pleasing but more ordinary singer; his use of the messa di voce is especially moving. While the Nordic Chamber Choir is indeed fine, the Arnold Schoenberg Chamber Choir is a world-class outfit. Both orchestras are admirable.
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By "ianjack25" on 3 Feb. 2004
Format: Audio CD
This is surely one of Haydn’s most moving and contemplative works and this recording by the Arnold Schoenberg Choir conducted by Nikolaus Harnoncourt is about the finest I have ever heard. It highlights the meaning of the music, allowing us to meditate on the final words of Christ on the cross, accompanied only by Haydn’s wonderful music.
The soloists are impeccable in every respect. One exquisite moment is the entry of Anthony Rolfe-Johnson at the start of “Jesus rufet, Ach, mich dürstet” – the pizzicato is barely audible, delicately suspending his plaintive cry as if he were hanging by but a thread.
The orchestral playing is of the highest standard too, persuasive but never intruding on the sombre mood of the piece.
The recording and presentation of the CD are both excellent and the acoustics of the Casino Zögernitz are also good.
Whether you know this piece or listening to it for the first time I am sure you will not be disappointed by this recording.
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By Samuel B. Lopez on 1 April 2015
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
amazing service, this cd is a replacement. Very pleased and in time for Holy Week. Wonderful, and thanks.

Sam
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By A. Clej on 5 Feb. 2015
Format: MP3 Download Verified Purchase
The music of eternity.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 6 reviews
17 of 20 people found the following review helpful
Very good performance of 'Seven Last Words' 21 Mar. 2001
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This is a very good performance of the 'Seven Last Words' from Haydn. Note that it is the vocal version, not the earlier solely instrumental version. Especially the choir and the concert are remarkable. In my personal opinion, the soloists are good as well, but this is sometimes a matter of personal taste. I think this performance is one of the few from a reknowned conductor, although many other versions exist conducted by less reknowned conductors and/or choirs, which results in few competing versions. Recommended!
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Harnoncourt or Matt? 10 Sept. 2011
By Ralph Moore - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Reading a decidedly lukewarm review of this recording by a reviewer whose opinions I often read and respect sent me back to it for another listen as I had always enjoyed it very much and was rather surprised by his objections.

In the end it is a question of one's taste and response to the scale and overt emotionality of Harnoncourt's interpretation. The reviewer's preferred version by Nicol Matt, available cheaply on Brilliant, is on the face of it similar in that it uses the oratorio version with four soloists, a choir and an orchestra. I enjoy this wonderfully profound music in any of its incarnations, from the solo keyboard arrangement, through string quartet, to full orchestra, to the one we have here and they all enjoyed Haydn's approval.

There is no doubt that Harnoncourt sets out to give us an unabashedly "Romantic" account, leaning heavily on accents and emphasising the suffering behind the text whereas the Stemra disc with Matt conducting is a much more restrained, some would say refined, and redolent of a smaller-scale enterprise with a more intimate acoustic and a somewhat more claustrophobic atmosphere. While Matt's soloists may be "unknowns" they are very good, even if the bass is rather growly compared with Robert Holl's more rotund tones for Harnoncourt and Anthony Rolfe-Johnson's plaintive and intrinsically lovely tenor is clearly a superior instrument to Matt's pleasing but more ordinary singer; his use of the messa di voce is especially moving. While the Nordic Chamber Choir is indeed fine, the Arnold Schoenberg Chamber Choir is a world-class outfit. Both orchestras are admirable.

In a more purist frame of mind I like the Matt version very much but I also respond to Harnoncourt's intensity; he brings out the excoriating physical cruelty of the crucifixion by daring to underline the music as if it were a cry of pain; conversely he finds a serenity in the interludes depicting the paradise which awaits. The size of orchestra also allows him to give proper weight to the "terremoto" conclusion.

In the end, I shall continue to live with and enjoy both versions, even if my instinct leans towards Harnoncourt while my intellect admires the poise and clarity of the Matt recording.
15 of 21 people found the following review helpful
Devout? maybe; the best? Hardly 5 April 2007
By Larry VanDeSande - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
David Hurwitz's comment that this is "simply the best performance available" either means he hasn't heard many or he is on payroll of this production company. When I sang this music some years back I listened to every recording there was and I've purchased a number of others since that time. The Harnoncourt version, to put it mildly, is unreligious, unsubtle and crude. Only bass Robert Holl distinguishes himself among the soloists and the clear recording does nothing to modify the mushy German of the chorus.

The best version currently before the public is by a bunch of people you never heard of on the Brilliant Classics label conducted by Nicol Matt, a choral specialist of growing reputation. That recording from 2002 is newer than Harnoncourt's, has none of his annoying personal characteristics, is better sung, better produced, has more immediate and more finely detailed sound, and costs less new. For those that demand to spend full price money on a CD, the recent re-release of Rilling's excellent version is avaiable with an extra from Michael Haydn.

Why anyone would hand their hat on this version mystifies me. The one advantage it has is it stays in print while others fade away. Fortunately, the Brilliant Classics version is still available. Get it while you can.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
the usual exquisite booklet comes with this fine Teldec release 5 Aug. 2014
By NUC MED TECH - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
08-05-2014 I have known about these "7 last words" for most of my career as a self-taught music listener and amateur critic, but never collected them until last year, and I paid just under $5.00 for it. It is quite a bargain getting the quality of this Teldec recording, from October of 1990. What we get for our money is a group of 5 soloists from the world of opera and sacred vocal music, as well as the splendid Arnold Schoenberg Choir plus the grand and highly polished Concentus Musicus of Wien, and all are under the leadership of the scholarly Nicholas Harnoncourt. the usual exquisite booklet comes with this fine Teldec release, and the actual image on the front of the CD case is a detail from Jan Bruegel's "Kreuzberg Christi", which , unfortunately, I could not locate a larger image of.
These Seven Last Words are really, seven phrases or even individually spoken sentences Our Lord made from the cross at Calvary. Most of them are of a lamentation nature as they mimic the individual parts of the composer's sacred scores, cantatas, oratorios and even masses. For example, take track 7.
Track #7 is titled "Jesus rufet, Ach, mich durstet!" translated as "Jesus saith: Alas, I thirst!" Then the choir enters with it's commentary, with or without any of the vocal soloists and , of course, the small orchestra. In the specific case of section #5 on track #7, the tenor opens the text, after a very dramatic orchestral lead in and he sounds a bit distant which is a touch I liked, whether or not it was intended by the composer or not. Dramatic choral/instrumental interjections continue throughout this short piece, clocking in at 7:54, with the entire 10 tracks totaling 62;44, easily a final work in a choral/orchestral concert hall program,live in a symphony hall, anywhere.
often conducting on the rather brisk side, perhaps because there is evidence that this speed was the performance norm in those days, Harnoncourt here takes his time, but perhaps it is due to the serious nature of the subject matter. However, his readings of some of the Bach passion week productions bear a tense and urgent mood. Each segment carries it's own general tone as a separate entity and some are even a bit tranquil and even a little peaceful. Haydn shows homage to J. S. Bach, who borrowed from the ancient Greeks the concept of a chorus, commenting on the scene, either a visual one or one that resides in the heart of the believer. the lyricism of these Seven Last Words is impressive and,, as the notes state, the composer felt pressure to create a sustained temperament throughout these 10 cuts, all of them Adagios and capable of holding our attention , due here specifically because of Harnoncourt's expertise and off the charts skill as an interpreter of Early Music, notably Early Sacred Music.
The author later redid the oratorio as a setting for String Quartet, for take home collection of pieces that could be played and enjoyed in the parlors of the wealthy of the day. but, as an Oratorio, I feel, it is even a greater treasure, and this may be the recording to own, as the competition, of which I have yet to sample, is unlikely to be either better or simply as good as this rendition from Teldec.
This sublime work by Nicholas Harnoncourt is a wonderful addition to any Haydn fan's library shelves as it gives another example of that form he used to great artistic success in his other Oratorios, "The Creation," and "The Seasons". Here, truly is a 5 star rating and a very high recommendation for a great but under programed gem from the master himself Franz Joseph Haydn.
Treat yourselves, my friends, to this wonderfully rich and fulfilling work and now I pray that God blesses you, all, Tony. AMDG!!
ZZ
Penitential music 21 April 2012
By George Goldberg - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Haydn, long-lived (1732-1809) and prolific, composed a huge body of music in every genre from chamber music and symphonies (104!) to opera, masses, passions, oratorios and this rather strange affair. It encompasses 7 choral sections, 2 orchestral interludes, and a brief finale entitled Il Terremoto (The Earthquake). It is unrelentingly austere and slow-moving (all adagio), very unlike the familiar Haydn. The instrumental (original instruments, identified) and choral forces here are fine and Harnoncourt, whom I realize is a somewhat controversial conductor of religious music, to my mind chooses good tempos and establishes a satisfying balance between voices and instruments. But this music is in effect a penance; I would not want to hear it too often. If I could rate music and performance separately, I would give the composer 3 stars and the performers 5. As I cannot do that, I rate the entire production at 4. But if I were to give it an enjoyment rating, it would be much lower - a matter of personal taste, to be sure, which is why I don't impose a rating of, say, 2 stars on other readers. But still I must modify my 4-star rating to say that I don't recommend this recording - or, more to the point, this music. (I speak only of its musical value; I am not competent to judge it in religious terms.)
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