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Haydn: Piano Sonatas 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47

3 customer reviews

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Frequently Bought Together

Haydn: Piano Sonatas 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47 + Haydn: Piano Sonatas 59, 60, 61, 62 + Haydn: Piano Sonatas 53-56 & 58/'Piccolo' Variations
Price For All Three: £20.45

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Product details

  • Composer: Joseph Haydn
  • Audio CD (1 July 1994)
  • SPARS Code: DDD
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Naxos
  • ASIN: B0000273HY
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 254,185 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Allegro Con Brio
2. Menuet
3. Finale : Presto
4. Piano Concerto No. 1 in C Minor, Op. 35
5. Menuet
6. Finale : Presto
7. Moderato
8. Adagio
9. Tempo Di Menuet
10. Allegro - Adagio
11. Tempo Di Menuet
12. Moderato
13. Allegretto
14. Finale : Presto
15. Piano Concerto No. 1 in C Minor, Op. 35
16. Menuet
17. Finale : Presto

Product Description

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By John Austin HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on 30 Dec. 2001
Naxos numbers these sonatas as 42 to 47 in their series of the complete keyboard sonatas of Haydn, played by Jenö Jandó. They were written by Haydn between 1774 and 1776, and originally published as a set of six. During these same years Mozart also composed six keyboard sonatas, K. 279 to K 284. The Haydn set is particularly interesting and rewarding for both player and listener. Haydn was discovering ways of providing interest in all parts of the musical texture, from bass to treble, disposing almost entirely of the broken chord pattern that had formerly occupied the left hand throughout.
I haven't compared Jandó's Haydn series with those of other pianists, but I am certainly happy to own all that have been issued in his series so far. The playing is graceful, trim and alert. The sonatas in Volume 2, each in a different key, were recorded in 1993, and the total listening time is 72 minutes.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Robin Friedman TOP 500 REVIEWER on 14 Sept. 2009
Between 1774 -- 1780, Haydn published three sets of six piano sonatas. The first set of six, dedicated to Prince Esterhazy, was the first authorized publication of any of Haydn's works. It is available as volume 4 in the individual CD's of Jeno Jando's outstanding Haydn cycle, or as part of the box set that Naxos recently issued. The CD I am reviewing here consists of Jando's rendition of the second of the three sets of sonatas. The six sonatas included here were probably composed between 1774 -- 1776. They were published privately in 1776 before they appeared publically in an edition published in Hummel in 1778 and designated as Haydn's opus 14. Some of the sonatas are performed on occasion on single CDs devoted to Haydn. For example, Marc Andre-Hamelin performs one sonata from this group on each of his two two-CD recordings of Haydn sonatas. But it is rare to hear the entire set played on a single CD.

The sonatas in this group are varied and delightful. They exemplify early classical galantrie and balance and show the great influence of Scarlatti as well as the more frequently noted influence of C.P.E. Bach. The sonatas have strong rhythms, lyrical themes, humor, and balance among their movements. They do not wear their hearts on their sleeves and they have little in the tendency towards self-aggrandizement. With one exception, each of these sonatas is in three movements; and, again with one exception, each is in the major key. Jando does not have the virtuosity of Hamelin, but he plays these sonatas with style, elan, and effectiveness. His recordings are outstanding guides to the Haydn sonatas. Here are short descriptions of the individual sonatas.

The opening sonata in G major begins with a lighthearted allegro con brio highlighted by a lyrical second theme.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Dermot Elworthy on 25 Mar. 2009
Rather irritatingly, Naxos do not offer the Haydn sonatas as a set.

Haydn was a truly remarkable man. He bridged the divide between the Barok - he was 18 when Bach died - and what later became known as the Classical period (which has no evolutionary difference from the Romantic epoch but we are required to respect these often silly semantics) and he did this almost single handedly. The lengthy span of this bridge is measured, at least in part, by the development of his keyboard compositions and his expansion of the sonata form from probably before 1760 to 1794 - the year in which he, with almost seamless musicality (and neatly bypassing the likes of Clementi and Mozart in the process), passed the baton to Beethoven who accepted the Haydn legacy in his Opus 2, Nr1 Sonata but barely completed the second movement before he was off in pursuit of his own unique destiny! I am reminded of the oft-quoted observation that Brahms's first Symphony was Beethoven's tenth; here Beethoven's first Sonata might have been Haydn's sixty-third.

Joseph Haydn did not write any more piano sonatas after the publication of Beethoven's first; I suspect he might have felt that anything further to be said on the subject would be better coming from the young prodigy and former pupil who, even then, was recognised as the herald of a different future.

Although the Naxos volumes are not numbered sequentially with the Hoboken listings, within the constraints of time available on each disc, it is possible to chart the inventive progress of Haydn's writing from the relatively simple construction of the early works to the sophistication of those written at the dawn of the 19th. century. This was a period of rapid musical development; that Haydn kept up where others fell by the wayside is creditable.
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