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Hawkeye Volume 3: L.A. Woman (Marvel Now) (Hawkeye (Marvel Now!)) Paperback – 21 Oct 2014


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Product details

  • Paperback: 120 pages
  • Publisher: Marvel - US (21 Oct 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0785183906
  • ISBN-13: 978-0785183907
  • Product Dimensions: 16.8 x 0.6 x 26 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,147 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Sam Quixote TOP 50 REVIEWER on 15 Nov 2014
Format: Paperback
Clint Barton aka Hawkeye screwed up. No surprises there, but this time his protege, Kate Bishop aka Hawkeye, has had enough. She's leaving New York for the West Coast, and she's taking Lucky aka Pizza Dog with her. Together, they'll set up an unlicensed private detective agency and Kate will strike out as: the West Coast Avenger!

When Kate left to be her own person and left Clint behind, the series literally became split with Matt Fraction writing one issue of Clint, then one issue of Kate, and so on, which is why the numbering of this volume is all over the place (#14, 16, 18, 20 & Annual #1), and why it's been over a year since volume 2 came out that we're finally seeing volume 3. Good news is that volume 4 is right around the corner, bad news is that it's Fraction and co.'s last Hawkeye book!

I really liked this book but I didn't LOVE it like I did the last two Hawkeyes, so, before the praise, let's get the negs out of the way.

Hawkeye as a series has worked really well because of the concept - what he does when he's NOT being an Avenger. It's an anti-superhero book. It's about becoming more street level than an already street level character. And that was really charming - for Clint.

For Kate? Well, she sets up a detective agency. I love Wes Anderson and Jason Schwartzman/Bored to Death, but that is such a hipster douchebag-y thing to do. A detective agency? It's just so twee and precious, y'know? And then there's the cases themselves where she goes looking for some stolen orchids, or helps out a Brian Wilson-type who was a `60s superstar who went crazy and has been working on his masterpiece album for decades... they weren't bad to read, I just wasn't enamoured with them.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Mice Guy TOP 100 REVIEWER on 7 Nov 2014
Format: Paperback
The stories from issues #14, #16, #18 and #20 of Hawkeye’s Marvel Now series are collected, along with Annual #1, as Hawkeye Volume 3: L.A. Woman (Marvel Now) (Hawkeye (Marvel Now!)) The strange sequencing is (I am guessing) because these issues are all Kate Bishop’s adventures in L.A., and the missing issues will be Clint Barton’s adventures, appearing in the next volume.

The story opens in the Annual, or at least 28 pages of it, as Kate Bishop has a falling-out with Clint Barton, packs her stuff – “You had that much stuff over here?” – and sets off for a new life in Los Angeles, along with Lucky the dog and a quiver full of trick-arrows. Coincidentally, would you believe, Madame Masque is currently headquartered there, and her Intel people spot Kate arriving, and soon a nefarious (that’s a pun on Madame Masque’s real name, by the way – and it is not ‘Whitney Frost’) plan is put into operation… This sets up an ongoing revenge story – Madame Masque was humiliated in the previous volume (and again in this one) – that runs through this collection, which involves stolen Orchids, an army of henchmen dressed as Bell-Boys, house (and cat) sitting while moonlighting as a Public Investigator (you need a license to be a Private one), shopping for cat-food, and Harold H. Harold (from Tomb of Dracula) (no, really). We also get to meet Kate’s father, her step-mother (who went to school with Kate), a traditional embittered LA Police Detective, and a secret criminal enterprise involving SHIELD technology – Maria Hill: “We can neither confirm nor deny that, Ms Bishop”.
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I got this on pre-order because I loved the previous 2 volumes so much, but WOW, Matt Fraction has surpassed himself with this one. I could see this becoming a film or TV series - his Kate Bishop is so engaging. She's funny & believable, and yes, there are some scary moments where she gets the crap beaten out of her, no unrealistic conservation of ninjutsu moments. There's a good sting in the tail of this tale, which I won't reveal here, but wow, when you read it, it'll be mind-blowing. Really good book - read from cover to cover in an afternoon & then put on my shelf with a huge grin on my face.

Artwork is interesting - still kind of in keeping with the sparse, limited palette of previous volumes, though it does break free of that a bit. Slightly manga-ish, cartoony portrayal of Katie when she's annoyed or frustrated, makes her seem more like a little girl at times than a grown woman, but that's pretty good: she's a trainee, not yet quite a seasoned veteran, and she is having trouble on her own. She's young yet, lacks experience, but she overcomes anyway through her never-back-down spirit. I like. I like a lot.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 15 reviews
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Hooray for Matt Fraction's Hawkeye 21 Oct 2014
By Daneel Olivaw - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I don't usually give out five stars, but Matt Fraction's Hawkeye series has earned it not just because it's so good, but because it's so good when much of what Marvel is publishing these days is disappointing. Hawkeye is like a breath of fresh air, the type of comic that reminds longtime fans of the medium just why they love comics so much.

This is the third volume collecting this title and it is as enjoyable as the earlier two (which you really should read first), even though it will not give you your Clint Barton fix. He disappears after page three of the first story and we instead follow Kate Bishop, the female teen-aged Hawkeye, as she runs off to Los Angeles to reboot her life. Kate is an engaging enough character to support the rest of the book, which brings her in conflict with Madame Masque, who's kind of like Doctor Doom except she's a gangster rather than the monarch of an Eastern European country (and she used to date Tony Stark).

The first story, from Hawkeye Annual #1, is the best because it has wonderful art by Javier Pulido, who draws in a very cartoony way but with a superb design sense and a very pleasant style. Even the credits box is wonderful. The rest of the book is illustrated by Annie Wu, who can't equal Pulido (few could), but does a very creditable job in maintaining the mood of the series. Still, this is Matt Fraction's triumph and the writing is sublime. If you are enjoying the other Marvel titles that employ similar down-to-earth writing, like Superior Foes of Spider-Man and the current She-Hulk series, you should love Hawkeye as well.

But as I said, you should start from the beginning. Only after you've read the stories in the Hawkeye books "My Life As a Weapon" and "Little Hits" should you read this volume in order to get the maximum enjoyment from it. And then give thanks that Marvel hasn't completely lost its way if it can still find room to publish stories like these.
Lady Hawkguy 15 Nov 2014
By Sam Quixote - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Clint Barton aka Hawkeye screwed up. No surprises there, but this time his protege, Kate Bishop aka Hawkeye, has had enough. She’s leaving New York for the West Coast, and she’s taking Lucky aka Pizza Dog with her. Together, they’ll set up an unlicensed private detective agency and Kate will strike out as: the West Coast Avenger!

When Kate left to be her own person and left Clint behind, the series literally became split with Matt Fraction writing one issue of Clint, then one issue of Kate, and so on, which is why the numbering of this volume is all over the place (#14, 16, 18, 20 & Annual #1), and why it’s been over a year since volume 2 came out that we’re finally seeing volume 3. Good news is that volume 4 is right around the corner, bad news is that it’s Fraction and co.’s last Hawkeye book!

I really liked this book but I didn’t LOVE it like I did the last two Hawkeyes, so, before the praise, let’s get the negs out of the way.

Hawkeye as a series has worked really well because of the concept - what he does when he’s NOT being an Avenger. It’s an anti-superhero book. It’s about becoming more street level than an already street level character. And that was really charming - for Clint.

For Kate? Well, she sets up a detective agency. I love Wes Anderson and Jason Schwartzman/Bored to Death, but that is such a hipster douchebag-y thing to do. A detective agency? It’s just so twee and precious, y’know? And then there’s the cases themselves where she goes looking for some stolen orchids, or helps out a Brian Wilson-type who was a ‘60s superstar who went crazy and has been working on his masterpiece album for decades… they weren’t bad to read, I just wasn’t enamoured with them.

Oddly, the concept the series has thus far tried to avoid - the superhero story - IS the best part of LA Woman. Kate tangling with her nemesis Madame Masque (who we met earlier in Volume 1 when Kate impersonated her) were the most entertaining moments in her story. It forced her to step up and become more real than the posturing, overly cute hipster-type she is when she’s pretending she’s a PI.

I loved that Fraction splits the Hawkeyes but they both end up having similar adventures. On the East Coast, Clint’s got Clown-Face and the tracksuit bros to contend with, while on the West Coast, Kate’s got Madame Masque and the bellboys to fight.

Then there’s Kate herself, whose character I really liked. I know, I called her a hipster douchebag, but, thankfully, there’s more to her than that - she’s got a great personality, she’s funny, she’s clever, she’s silly. She’s basically the younger female version of Clint! More impressively though is that Fraction’s made her seem like a real person - in the Marvel Universe!

She is a superhero who’s part of the Young Avengers, and she’s killer with the bow, but she’s also a teenager and her limited world experience comes through at times to make her seem vulnerable, naive and human. She’s also optimistic and caring, and I’m tiptoeing around the fact that she’s beautiful too because that’s a pretty shallow judgement, but what the hell - yes I would!

Which brings us to Annie Wu, the artist on the Kate Bishop issues (David Aja draws the Clint Barton issues). Wowee, is this art good! Kate’s outfit is stylish but practical and also fits into her dead-broke-ain’t-no-joke situation. And yeah she makes Kate look gorgeous too! Wu isn’t Aja in that she doesn’t do crazy imaginative layouts and approaches, but she lends a smooth, flowing and beautiful line to the comics that feels perfect for the breezy West Coast culture. It’s her own style but it’s also incredibly accomplished and stunning to see - Hawkeye is a series that has had nothing but fine artists throughout. And I especially loved that Kate’s PI mentor looked exactly like Elliott Gould in The Long Goodbye!

My favourite issue in the book though was drawn by Javier Pulido, the artist from the two-parter Tape storyline from Hawkeye Volume 1 (and who’s also currently drawing the brilliant She-Hulk series). Some people might not like his silhouette-heavy style, but I adore it and, while all of his pages were awesome, his credits panel was ridiculously special. It also helped that that issue was probably the best written of the bunch, too.

Hawkeye Volume 3 may not be as perfect as the first two volumes were, but, damn, those were some pretty high bars Fraction and co. set for themselves, and it’s unfair to expect that level in every outing. Instead, Volume 3 is a really good Hawkeye book, one that focuses on a different Hawkeye but still retains the Hawkeye atmosphere and fun. Fans of the series will certainly enjoy it as will those who miss Kieron Gillen/Jamie McKelvie’s Young Avengers - this is the story of what Kate did next. And she did good!
Female Hawkeye is still Hawkeye...so still great. 15 Nov 2014
By thedean - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
While the book isn't focusing on Clint Barton, it's still focusing on Hawkeye. Specifically, not the Hawkguy: The main character here is Kate. And, she's able to carry the Hawkeye title just like Clint on her own.

Tired with Clint and her family dragging her down, she's setting out to redefine herself in LA, bringing Lucky with her on her journey. As the story is still interested in Kate, we get her story but instead of dividing up the issues they decided to devote entire issues to Kate and switch back to Clint when the single issues were coming out. As such, this has Hawkeye #s 14, 16, 18, and 20 as well as the first annual in front. If you want the other Hawkeye's story, you'll have to read Volume 4 which (as of this posting) isn't out yet.

Now, because nothing goes as planned, Kate's stay in LA starts imploding ten minutes after she arrives. Her credit card (her only one) is declined and bellmen steal her luggage while her car is toed. She's saved by Whitney Frost, a seemingly nice woman who is actually Madame Masque. If you go back to the first volume, it'll be clear why this is especially problematic for Kate and why everything went to hell given that she has this enemy, based in LA. After escaping, it's basically trying to figure out how to stand on her own two feet given that everything is stolen from her.

Just as the previous Hawkeyes followed Clint's daily life, the same is true for Kate. And, like Clint, it involves more heroic measures to get through it as well. To earn money, she first starts cat/trailer sitting but soon turns to detective work that ends up involving her more with Masque's LA empire. The stories are somewhat stand-alone-ish, in that the focus isn't split between issues but they weave together as they add to the overall story in the end. Her immediate struggle ends with that issue, but it's just another step in dealing with the bigger picture.

The art is mostly the same, with less color and shading used like the preceding Hawkeye issues but this isn't to say it's just as minimalistic. More color can appear on the page and overall it seems more detailed than before. Perhaps it's to contrast the different Hawkeyes but overall it's still beautiful art. It's cartoony at points, but conveys the emotion perfectly.

Really, the only thing that might scare off people is an unfamiliarity with Kate Bishop. If you haven't read the Young Avengers, then you really only get what was before in the Hawkeye issues and while those do highlight a lot about her, it's not devoted to her character completely. She's much more flushed out here, and it becomes very apparent why she was given the same codename throughout the story. This isn't to say that she's a female Clint, but they can fill each other's roles well and Kate even has some of Clint's sarcasm and penchant for making jokes.
Fraction does a wonderful writing job - as always - but here's the ... 29 Oct 2014
By Mrs. V - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Hawkeye with a caveat... you need to know this character to appreciate her. Yes, she's appeared as a costar in the series prior to this volume... but with the exception of a few choice bits, the reader really doesn't get insight into Kate Bishop as a rounded person until this volume.

Fraction does a wonderful writing job - as always - but here's the thing: the HAWKEYE title seems to be written on the assumption that fans of the Clint Barton Hawkeye already know and like Kate Bishop. This is probably one of the only serious problems I had with the series from the get-go. When readers of the monthly were promised "the return of a fan favorite," I expected either Black Widow (to catch the new fans drawn into the Avengers franchise by the movie) or Mockingbird (adored by old school readers).

Touting Kate Bishop as a "fan favorite" may be accurate - she does have a massive and vocal following - provided you understand that these are largely fans with a history of reading the YOUNG AVENGERS series. While it's not essential to read that series to "get" Kate in this one, it definitely helps to understand that no, she's not just some bratty teen with an attitude and a superiority complex (which, sadly, is EXACTLY how she comes off in most of her interactions with Hawkeye Senior in Vol. 1-2). She's a character with a deep and complicated history of her own, none of which is referenced in the HAWKEYE title.

None of it is referenced in this volume, either - but at least we get to see a more rounded view of Kate, her humor and fears and foibles. Okay, she stole Clint's dog.* That can be forgiven. In this volume, Kate shows real, human vulnerability for the first time... not just irritation, not just uncertainty... and the personality that made Young Avengers fans adore her. She tries to go out entirely on her own, make her own way in the world outside of the daughter/girlfriend/superhero roles she's found herself in, get her life into a semblance of order on her own terms. She's out to find herself, and she's wonderful. Now she can interact with others in an engaging, even likeable way - because she's not feeling like she needs to play caretaker for a broken Barton. The supporting cast is wonderful, the art fits the mood perfectly, and made me do a 180 in my previous assessment of a character I'd virtually written off as a bratty teen, written to appeal to younger readers. She still isn't my favorite... but I no longer dislike her so intensely.

But that's just me, and your take may be different. I fear for what will happen when she eventually returns to New York - the interplay of the two characters does not work for me, and personally, the Kate/Clint 'shippers give me the heebie jeebies (age difference, much?) Really, it seems like Kate was brought into the series to provide the overworked writing/ art team a means of carving out some space for their own personal ventures - and it works well that way.

PROS - Character development, humor, obscure pop culture references, engaging supporting cast.
CONS - If you're reading to follow Clint Barton's storyline, you won't miss much by skipping this collection entirely.

*No, she did NOT "save the dog's life" - she was making a point, walking out of what she saw as an intolerable personal situation, and taking the dog was the coup de grace - "I don't like how you're acting, you're being a loser, and you know what? I don't think you're a responsible human being, so I'm taking your dog, too, since he doesn't like you right now, either. So there." In order for the act to be seen as "saving" the dog, she would need to first know that the dog was in jeopardy, which she didn't. Ergo, dognapping.
A solid book 15 Nov 2014
By Frank L. Greenagel Jr. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I like Wu's throwback art (although it is not as good as Aja's). This is not your cool Uncle's Hawkeye...instead, it features Kate Bishop exclusively. She's a strong female lead with a real female body and real female tastes. It's fairly unique, and I'd like to ask Matt Fraction at a panel discussion someday what his inspiration was for Ms. Bishop and if he had any help from females in his life (or on the periphery).

The story takes place in LA and has a series of mini-adventures/escapades, but all the while we know that Ms. Bishop is going to make her way back to Clint and NYC. Hawkeye's absence is felt a bit (because Fraction has done a nice Han Solo thing with him on this run), and the fact that he does not appear in this trade shows that both Marvel and Fraction have confidence in the longevity of this run. A solid book.
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