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Hatful Of Hollow
 
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Hatful Of Hollow

26 Jun 2001 | Format: MP3

£7.49 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £6.00 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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2:34
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 26 Jun 2001
  • Release Date: 26 Jun 2001
  • Label: WM UK
  • Copyright: 1986 Warner Music UK Ltd
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 56:08
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B005NHXNDQ
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (54 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 15,255 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Elizabeth Gershwin on 16 Sep 2007
Format: Audio CD
Some albums pass the time, some provide pleasant background noise at dinner parties, but only an elite few bands/albums have the potential to change lives, and this is one of them.

'Hatful Of Hollow', amongst other Smiths releases, must have changed thousands, if not millions of lives all over the world, including this reviewer's. From the moment Morrissey's vocals kicked in during the opening bars of 'William It Was Really Nothing', I knew that this band would change my life, and that it would be a long time indeed before I heard anything as authentic and charismatic as this.

It was the meeting of two geniuses: Morrissey and Marr. Marr was a young virtuoso of guitar, Morrissey was a young writer with an almost scholarly passion for authenticity and creativity. The result was unique, influential beyond measure. Ode to sexuality 'What Difference Does it Make' boasts vocals, lyrics, guitar and a rhythm section most bands would weep over, whilst 'These Things Take Time' ponders more matters of the heart, and the groin, in Morrissey's trademark knowingly salacious way. The album then goes from excellent to jaw-dropping with tracks four and five. Four being 'This Charming Man', which brought the Smiths to the masses and simultaneously revealed Morrissey's distinctive shirt, beads and gladioli garb. Then track five, the song which has probably changed more lives than any other, that flawless anthem of disaffection 'How Soon Is Now?' In this, Morrissey speaks directly to anyone who ever felt lonely, or alienated, or a lack of affinity with their fellow human beings, whilst also, in a stunningly articulate way, commenting on the hollow, vapid, soulless quality of club culture and the lack of romantic opportunities it provides to anyone with a shred of individuality.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By P. Frizelle on 16 April 2010
Format: Audio CD
Already the darlings of the late great John Peel and the music press, Morrissey and Marr's Smiths had, by 1984, yet to make a satisfying entry in the album stakes. Their eponymous debut had some fine songs, but the production had left them sounding un-finished. Luckily their prodigious work-rate and sensible decision to use Radio 1 sessions as substitute studio/rehearsal time meant that they were soon perfecting their recorded sound as well as honing their formidable writing skills. A deal was struck to release these sessions along with some non-album A and B sides as Hatful Of Hollow. Hatful...'s versions of the debut's material, including ''Hand In Glove'', ''Reel Around The Fountain'' and ''What Difference Does It Make'', suddenly come alive in this quick and dirty environment, more closely resembling the live favourites that had won them acclaim in the first place. But it was the new material that really shone here in both Morrissey's deadpan witticisms and Marr's way with a punchy hook, mastering the gothic, Northern pathos. It has Morrissey's faintly mocking sense of teenage rejection offset by Marr's stunning vibrato guitar chimes and a rhythm section you could set your watch to. It was their true debut in every sense. This is the prime dose of Smiths, these versions of old tried and tested songs have a freshness about them with a inexplicable raw edge that makes them sound about a hundred times better than they did on the debut. There aren't many bands within modern English language pop music that can elicit versatile heartfelt sighs.

Hatful of Hollow captures precisely 16 shots of adolescent displeasure, humour, frustration, wishful thinking, and frankly, fixation; sounding in turns like slaps, punches and long, drawn out sighs.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Mr Ogden on 20 April 2013
Format: Audio CD
For years and years (and years and years) i've kept The Smiths at arms length, mainly due to my inability to get past Morrisseys "Dour depressing lyrics and his gladioli flowers hanging out of his arse". Long story short, I just wasn't ready for The Smiths, Hatful Of Hollow soon remedied this.

It was on a chance car journey out to my mates that I finally decided to give The Smiths the second chance I knew they deserved, enough of my friends/co-workers had been advising since, it seemed, the beginning of time. It was then with a beautiful whoosh that "William It Was Really Nothing" signified what was about to be a huge change in my musical life. The most important thing this album displayed was The Smiths' ability to ROCK, something I thought wasn't possible from what i'd sampled in the past. "These Things Take Time", "Handsome Devil", "Girl Afraid" and "You've Got Everything Now" all demonstrate this with aplomb.

Needless to say, what makes the Morrissey/Marr partnership so effective is they marry so well, albeit with conflicting styles. Whereas on the one hand you have songs dealing with (in a tongue-in-cheek fashion) depression ("Heaven Knows I'm Miserable Now") to the midnight desertion of a new-born child ("This Night Has Opened My Eyes"), you can always get at least SOME level of enjoyment out of the songs. Be it Morriseys painfully whitty and intellectual lyrics or Marrs dextrous playing, summed up perfectly in the timeless "Still Ill" and universally known "How Soon Is Now".

Gentle acoustic ballads are also abound with an early primitive (but no less brilliant) version of "This Charming Man" to "Back To The Old House" and the almighty come-down/album closer "Please Please Please Let Me Get What I Want".
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