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Harvest 2011

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(29) IMDb 6.7/10
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Drama in which two young apprentices at a farm find themselves increasingly drawn to one another. Life on a farm is essentially all Marko (Lukas Steltner) knows. Born and raised in the countryside, he lives the quiet life of the land and keeps to himself at school, where he seems to have little interest in the approaches of girls. Marko begins to come out of his shell when Jacob (Kai Michael Müller) arrives to train on the farm. Unlike Marko, Jacob has become attracted to life as a farm hand as an alternative to the world of finance in which he trained. The two young men become increasingly close, but is it only friendship both seek?

Starring:
Lukas Steltner, Steven Baade
Rental Formats:
DVD

Product Details

Discs
  • Feature ages_15_and_over
Runtime 1 hour 28 minutes
Starring Lukas Steltner, Steven Baade, Kai Michael Müller
Director Benjamin Cantu
Genres Drama
Studio FUSION MEDIA SALES
Rental release 21 November 2011
Main languages German
Subtitles English

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

3.2 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

29 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Tom Smith on 21 Nov. 2011
Format: DVD
Harvest is one of the most original and beautiful gay romances I have ever seen. The slow burning film follows the growing attraction between two 'straight' male farmhands. What starts as a tentative friendship turns into something achingly real. The film has such a natural and authentic sensibility that, at times, it almost feels as if you are watching a documentary. The performances are affecting, to say the least, and the actors have a genuine chemistry which shines throughout.

Another Gay Movie this ain't but if you're looking for a coming-of-age story with a difference this is for you!
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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By schumann_bg TOP 50 REVIEWER on 29 Nov. 2011
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I loved this film and watched it twice in succession. It is very refreshing to see a film on a gay subject that does not announce this almost straight off; here, the way the farm works and the life of the interns is shown at a slow enough pace for you really to get a sense of the place and how these young people might feel. The editing doesn't cut short discussions with their supervisor or trips out on to the field to put tags on calves, for instance. This means that when feelings between two of the young men do become apparent to themselves and to us, the whole thing feels very organic, and the romance is all the more tender for the tentative way it develops. You are very aware of this being a rural film, but it is full of very real human situations of many types - personally I liked the way so much is told in small gestures and glances. If you like action films and a fast-moving urban narrative then you won't find it here, but the characters are very natural and not at all ingratiating, and their foray into sexual feeling has remained with me days after seeing it.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Jarek on 1 Oct. 2012
Format: DVD
Benjamin Cantu's 'HARVEST' is a simply told love story of two lads who meet as farmhands and fall in love. There are sections where you learn some about various farming techniques such is the realist nature of the screenplay and plot. Marco and Jacob played by Lukas Steltner and Kai Michael Muller come from differing backgrounds. The former with issues (not least that he hasn't come out) while Jacob appears the more stable and sensing the other's recalcitrance makes most of the moves, until the inevitable. And that's just about all. No deep psychological meanderings. No flashy effects or camerawork. And despite some minor side plots such as Marco's weakness in writing, his reluctance towards girls making passes and so on, there's really not much more to it. Competent direction and design, Affable performances. I just wish they'd all cheer up a bit. An agreeable 85 minutes or so. In German with subtitles.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Jet404 on 2 April 2012
Format: DVD
The film follows two farming apprentices; the troubled, semi-literate Marko, and the more extrovert Jacob, who's packed in a job at a bank for a more ascetic existence.

Their undeniable attraction to each other begins to manifest in fleeting, awkward encounters. The two lead actors give brilliantly subtle performances, building more sexual / romantic tension than any other film I can think of.

Because of the interspersed scenes of farming, populated by non-actors, and which play almost like instructional documentary, the story feels utterly real. Ingeniously, the quiet, under-dramatised story achieves far more than an average romance and with far fewer brush-strokes. However, despite the documentary style of this film, many of the shots are very deliberately composed, and often linger increasingly gratuitously on the backs of necks, and jaw lines and so on, as if the director is gradually learning his two leads' best angles.

To see a depiction of a gay relationship that's stripped of materialism, of camp, and any wordy preoccupation with coming out, is refreshing. For some viewers, the film will feel slow and inconsequential, and for others, especially those familiar with the feeling of excitement and clandestinity and naughtiness that an unsuspected homosexual relationship often affords - this film will be the closest thing to reliving that experience.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
It took me a while to accustom myself to the slow pace and quiet atmosphere of the film, but after about a quarter of an hour I came to understand the intention, and to enjoy it. There is almost no music or voiceover to cloud our perceptions of the action, so the viewer can really feel like a "fly on the wall" at the farm. In an introverted social context, the characters speak very, very little, and their thoughts and feelings are implicit or conveyed by body language. The dialogue is sparse, most of it quite factual, instructional and educational. people don't discuss their feelings, and they struggle to make smalltalk. This can be confusing at first. The dialogue between the two men takes place within their heads, and is largely unspoken, so the viewer has to intuitively try to understand what they are feeling. There's plenty of action going on, but it happens inside the characters minds.

Apart from the story of sexual awakening on the part of the main characters, "Harvest" is fascinating as a documentary about the life of a real farm school in the former German Democratic Republic. As part of the production, the two lead actors became apprentices at the farm school. All the rest of the cast are the real staff and students at the real farm school, doing exactly what they would normally do, but for a few days with two new apprentices who take part quite naturally in the day-to-day lie on the farm.

The new apprentice, Jakob had been an apprentice at a bank before giving it up to learn about farming. We are not really told about his sexual identity, but the main problem he has to resolve seems to be how to approach his now fellow-student. For the other main character, Marco, the struggle is to accept his disruptive sexual feelings and sexual orientation.
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