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Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (Book 5) Hardcover – 21 Jun 2003

1,294 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 766 pages
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC (21 Jun. 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0747551006
  • ISBN-13: 978-0747551003
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 6.7 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1,294 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 17,531 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

J.K. Rowling is the author of the bestselling Harry Potter series of seven books, published between 1997 and 2007, which have sold over 450 million copies worldwide, are distributed in more than 200 territories, translated into 74 languages, and have been turned into eight blockbuster films. She has also written two small volumes, which appear as the titles of Harry's schoolbooks within the novels. Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them and Quidditch Through The Ages were published by Bloomsbury Children's Books in March 2001 in aid of Comic Relief. In December 2008, The Tales of Beedle the Bard was published in aid of the Children's High Level Group, and quickly became the fastest selling book of the year

As well as an OBE for services to children's literature, J.K. Rowling is the recipient of numerous awards and honorary degrees including the Prince of Asturias Award for Concord, France's Légion d'Honneur, and the Hans Christian Andersen Award, and she has been a Commencement Speaker at Harvard University USA. She supports a wide number of charitable causes through her charitable trust Volant, and is the founder of Lumos, a charity working to transform the lives of disadvantaged children

For further information about J.K. Rowling, please visit her new website:

(Photo credit: JP Masclet)

Product Description

Amazon Review

As his fifth year at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry approaches in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, 15-year-old Harry Potter is in full-blown adolescence, complete with regular outbursts of rage, a nearly debilitating crush, and the blooming of a powerful sense of rebellion. It's been yet another infuriating and boring summer with the despicable Dursleys, this time with minimal contact from our hero's non-Muggle friends from school. Harry is feeling especially edgy at the lack of news from the magic world, wondering when the freshly revived evil Lord Voldemort will strike. Returning to Hogwarts will be a relief… or will it?

Book five in JK Rowling's Harry Potter series follows the darkest year yet for our young wizard, who finds himself knocked down a peg or three after the events of last year. Over the summer, gossip (usually traced back to the magic world's newspaper, the Daily Prophet) has turned Harry's tragic and heroic encounter with Voldemort at the Triwizard Tournament into an excuse to ridicule and discount the teenager. Even Professor Dumbledore, headmaster of the school, has come under scrutiny from the Ministry of Magic, which refuses to officially acknowledge the terrifying truth: that Voldemort is back. Enter a particularly loathsome new character: the toad-like and simpering ("hem, hem") Dolores Umbridge, senior undersecretary to the minister of Magic, who takes over the vacant position of defence against dark arts teacher--and in no time manages to become the high inquisitor of Hogwarts. Life isn't getting any easier for Harry Potter. With an overwhelming course load as the fifth years prepare for their examinations, devastating changes in the Gryffindor Quidditch team line-up, vivid dreams about long hallways and closed doors, and increasing pain in his lightning-shaped scar, Harry's resilience is sorely tested.

Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, more than any of the four previous novels in the series, is a coming-of-age story. Harry faces the thorny transition into adulthood, when adult heroes are revealed to be fallible, and matters that seemed black and white suddenly come out in shades of gray. Gone is the wide-eyed innocent, the whiz kid of Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone. Here we have an adolescent who's sometimes sullen, often confused (especially about girls), and always self-questioning. Confronting death again, as well as a startling prophecy, Harry ends his year at Hogwarts exhausted and pensive. Readers, on the other hand, will be energised as they enter yet again the long waiting period for the next title in the marvellous magical series. --Emilie Coulter


I've yet to meet a ten-year-old who hasn't been entranced by its witty, complex plot and the character of the eponymous Harry (Independent)

Spellbinding, enchanting, bewitching stuff (Mirror)

Teachers say a chapter can silence the most rowdy of classes (Guardian)

One of the greatest literary adventures of modern times (Sunday Telegraph)

The Harry Potter stories will join that small group of children's books which are read and reread into adulthood (TLS) --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Nadia on 14 Nov. 2005
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I think that this book is the best written of the series. What I loved most about it was the development of Harry through this book. I think this book was very much a character development novel. I’ve loved many fictional characters over the years, but none quite as much as Harry. Because we’ve been with him from the start, we’ve been allowed to see every side of him, the bad and the good. JK Rowling has created a complex, and deeply human character who isn’t perfect and makes mistakes, and is the better hero for it. I’ll even go so far as to say that I think he’s the best hero ever created. I think we see Harry at his most vulnerable in this book. Still deeply disturbed by his frightful ordeal of the previous term, Harry is not helped by the fact that no one in authority will believe his story and seeks to silence him in any way they can. Harry’s frustration often gets the better of him in this book, and a devastating loss brings him close to despair.
Stephen Fry captures Harry’s moods brilliantly. The scene in Dumbledore’s office is powerful as much for Stephen Fry’s incredibly moving performance as for JK Rowling’s beautiful and sensitive prose. I really was moved to tears, and my heart ached for Harry.
Other characters were also developed in this book. Neville and Ginny really came in to their own. In fact, the theme of friendship was very strong throughout this book. We also learned much more about Snape, who I’ve always felt was Rowling’s most interesting character. I really felt for him in this book. I do think Order of The Phoenix is one of the best books I’ve ever read.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 21 Jun. 2003
Format: Hardcover
At fifteen years old Harry Potter is no longer the bespectacled moppet of the earlier books. He is a stroppy, angsty teenager forced by circumstances to grow up just a bit too fast. However the book retains the same magic as the others - a magic that kept me reading for about thirteen hours more or less solidly, in fact. For make no mistake, this is a big and complex book. Not too complex - people underestimate kids - but certainly challenging, especially for younger readers.
The book starts with a bang and grows dark in the middle as injustice, indignities and failures are heaped upon Harry without any apparent redress, (I had to break here for a while, and found it hard to start reading again) but events lighten up as he responds and adapts to his circumstances and finds new inner strength and new resources among his friends and allies.
A familiar message from Star Wars and the Lord of the Rings - the important of acknowledging and conquering your inner rage and hatred - is becoming a central theme. The themes of courage and tolerance are, as always, absolutely core, but the theme of resistance and even rebellion against authority, albeit corrupt, unfair and cowardly, sounds a new and more adult note.
A number of new characters include one of the most unpleasant and least redeemable personages ever to grace the pages of a children's book. No spoilers, but perhaps this character is a little too close to home and a little too unpleasant. The button of the reader's righteous indignation is pushed just once or twice too often, I think.
The book does have flaws, the greatest of which is that there is just too much going on. Some characters are underused and some subplots could just as easily have been left out.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By tigerthedog on 10 Aug. 2005
Format: Paperback
Many people deem this, the fifth book in the Harry Potter series, to be the worst of the six published so far, criticising it for being too long-winded, drawn out and not exciting enough. However I feel inclined to argue that this is one of Harry's finest, most magical and indeed most emotional adventures yet - and I feel every page is crammed with detail and that this (somewhat epic) novel is a tightly plotted masterpiece that manages to capture traits and trends of the people in our world and meld them spectacularly with Rowlings' fully formed wizarding world, which is just a joy to behold.
Admittedly the tone of this book is somewhat different from the previous four, and Harry takes on a rather grumpy persona throughout, but I found his teenage/adolescent tantrums totally in-character and definitely very true to life. I think by introducing such anger and angst into Harry's character, the book elevates in reality and the writing becomes more mature and character based. As the fifth book begins you feel you can't blame Harry for his constant bad mood, because a chain of disastrous events including the return of the evil Azkaban guards, the ever-mean Dursley family, horrible rumours in the wizarding press, girl trouble, a truly terrible new Defence Against the Dark Arts teacher, and of course the rise to power of the murderous Lord Voldermort follow him.
As always though Rowling manages to fill the story with red herrings, riddles, plot twists and surprises that keep you guessing to the end. Add a tragic death and Dumbledore revealing the truth behind the relationship with Harry, his scar and Lord Voldermort and this book is just as exciting as ever before. A brilliant book, that will keep you captivated throughout the entire 766 pages. If you like it, I would also suggest buying the audio edition, which is read brilliantly by Stephen Fry and makes the book even better. Highly recommended.
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