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Harrison Birtwistle: Ritual Fragment
 
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Harrison Birtwistle: Ritual Fragment

1 May 1993 | Format: MP3

£6.49 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £8.95 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title Artist
Time
Popularity  
30
1
3:22
30
2
3:43
30
3
4:44
30
4
5:45
30
5
6:59
30
6
11:33
30
7
3:05
30
8
4:20
30
9
3:23
30
10
2:26
30
11
1:14
30
12
1:34
30
13
2:56
30
14
2:34
30
15
3:59
30
16
1:36

Product details

  • Original Release Date: 1 May 1993
  • Label: NMC
  • Copyright: 1993 NMC Ltd
  • Total Length: 1:03:13
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001O2D1TA
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 130,068 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

27 of 29 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 23 Aug. 2001
Format: Audio CD
All three works on this disc are essential Birtwistle. Oliver Knussen is one of best conductors in the world. The London Sinfonietta needs no introduction. And NMC is one of the great independent labels. What else do you need?
Well, I know Birtwistle's music alienates some people, and in its way it is more radical than anything 50/60s Darmstadt serialism could offer. But it is perhaps also the most interesting, often in a extra-musical way.
Birtwistle, perhaps like Michel Foucault, seems to engage with forgotten areas of history (both musical and cultural, especially that of Britain). He makes history seem a strange, different, and incomprehensible world; he stresses its difference, and thus makes us re-exmaine our current position and cultural acrtivity. Like Stravinsky's Agon, his music problematises a notion of linear and progressive development. It is a critique of the rationalism and humanism of the Modern world, and the goal-orientated music that 'accompanied' it. Witness his interogation of pulse and clock time in Silbury Air (on Etcetera), narrative and the idea of character in the Mask of Orpheus (NMC), and, again somewhat like Foucault, his privileging of the sensous, pre-rational world of Archaic/early Classical Greece (eg, Tragoedia (Decca Britain)).
It is primeval music, yet could not have been written at any other time. In a cultural, not musical, sense, it perhaps exhibits, at the very least lays the foundations for, a radical postmodernity (Musical discussion of the modern and postmodern seems to revolve around whether so-and-so's music has a melody or not!)
The best description for all his music is probably Mechanical Pastoral.
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