Harrier: The Biography and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books.
Only 10 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Harrier has been added to your Basket
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Book is in great condition, eligible for super saver delivery and prime, shipped by Amazon.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Harrier Paperback – 5 Jun 2014

20 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£8.99
£2.35 £0.01
£8.99 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. Only 10 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Harrier + Spitfire: The Biography
Price For Both: £18.98

Buy the selected items together



Product details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Atlantic Books (5 Jun. 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1843548925
  • ISBN-13: 978-1843548928
  • Product Dimensions: 20 x 2.3 x 13.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 306,692 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

A wonderfully entertaining book, a rich mixture of science, social history and politics written with the verve, expertise and infectious enthusiasm we have come to expect from Glancey. Unlike the politicians and the MoD, this man knows what he is doing. --Patrick Bishop, Sunday Telegraph Takes you on a vivid tour through the history of the aircraft and the men and women who created and flew it. --Daily Express

About the Author

Jonathan Glancey is well known as the former architecture and design correspondent of the Guardian and Independent newspapers. He is also a steam locomotive enthusiast and pilot. A frequent broadcaster, his books include Giants of Steam, the bestselling Spitfire: The Biography; Nagaland: A Journey to India's Forgotten Frontier; Tornado: 21st Century Steam; The Story of Architecture and The Train: An Illustrated History.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.0 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Michael Parkes on 9 Jan. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I purchased the Kindle version of this book as it was the cheaper option but i still feel that was nearly £8 wasted.

I am 50% of the way through this book and can safely say that I have probably skim read and skipped through 50% of that! I was looking for a book on the Harrier not bogged down by too many technical details but a plotted history of its inception, development and service history with reasons behind its retirement. The book barely scratches at these points without digressing off into massive tangents that only fulfil to massively pad the book out.

'A wonderfully entertaining book, a rich mixture of science, social history and politics written with the verve, expertise and infectious enthusiasm we have come to expect from Glancey. Unlike the politicians and the MoD, this man knows what he is doing. --Patrick Bishop, Sunday Telegraph Takes you on a vivid tour through the history of the aircraft and the men and women who created and flew it. --Daily Express'

The above review from the Daily Express highlights the content of science, social history and politics. This is true but I would say that this is the main content with sudden burst of information about the Harrier woven in. It very much feels that the author has managed to associate the Harrier with historical events rather that the other way round.

The book starts with the withdrawal of Harrier service at RAF Cottesmore and a brief insight into the political reasons behind this. Good start. Then when it goes onto give you the thinking behind VTOL aircraft, it descends into a laborious story about magic carpets, Arabian Nights and Hindu gods! It waffles on about airships and Nazi prootype aircraft to name but a few.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Chris on 21 July 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
My life-long and enthusiastic involvement with ‘Hawker’ makes very keen that the history of the company and its fine aircraft should be accurately portrayed in books, especially those by well known authors. Consequently I looked forward to reading what promised to be, according to the ’blurb’ on the cover, a eulogy for the Harrier.

I found “Harrier” a frustrating work, a marred eulogy, I‘m afraid. There is much that is of great interest, especially the political and operational aspects of the story, but the book’s validity is diminished by the fact that on the historical and technical sides it contains many errors and misconceptions which I will point out below..

Page 12, para 2 - “…Hawker P.1127, the world’s first successful vertical take-off and landing aircraft (VTOL) aircraft.” Not even a Hawker enthusiast like me would claim that. Helicopters had been doing it for years and there had been several fixed wing machines that had successfuly accomplished VTOL and hovering flight. The P.1127 was the first successful jet V/STOL aircraft designed to fighter standards. All the others had been experimental or research aircraft. Anyway, on page 23, para 3, the author actually says that the first reliable VTOL aircraft were the rigid airships.

Page 32, para 2 - “spinning downwards”. I can’t visualise propellers spinning downwards. Does the author mean tilting downwards?

Page 33, para 2 - the AV-8B is certainly not in interceptor.

Page 40, para 1 - the correct designations are XFY-1 and XFV-1.

Page 41, para 1 - the XFV-1 was known as the Pogo, not Pogo Stick.

Page 44, para 3 - the SC-1 made its first flight at the A&AEE Boscombe Down then later moved to RAE Bedford. (Wikepedia is incorrect).
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 26 July 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Disappointed by this book, I read Glancey's book about the Spitfire a few years ago, but this rambling, error ridden, over emotional, repeating itself effort is a poor sequel. You could find more about the Harrier online, the choice of annedotes is bizzare, notable ommissions include the Sea Harrier that made an emergency landing on a container ship in the Atlantic in 1983 when the pilot lost contact with his carrier, incidently that aircraft is now on display at Newark Air Museum.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By R H on 2 Aug. 2014
Format: Paperback
A fairly entertaining read for its generalised review of how the Harrier fitted within the UK context during its career, but not much use if you're looking for a technical history of this aeroplane, as the title 'Harrier' might suggest.

It does frequently take off (no pun intended!) at frustrating tangents from the main subject, but once you're used to this, it's quite interesting.
The author does tend to repeat himself, and is rather fixated about the Spitfire - virtually to the exclusion of any other 1940's era aircraft that would be more comparable to the Harrier role (eg Typhoon, Tempest, Martlet, ..?) - perhaps the author is new to the subject?
There are also a number of technical errors which points to a misunderstanding as to how the aircraft functions, best summarised by another reviewer here - 'Chris'. For example, I too was mystified as to how the Harrier could be controlled in the hover by the exhaust gases 'passing over the control surfaces', or how a shoulder mounted wing could protect the fuselage from exhaust.

Nonetheless it does provide some illuminating political, economic & social context for this aircraft - and others, notably the BAe Hawk - as well as interesting discussion about its development, just don't expect much about the Harrier!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback