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Hardest Way to Make An Easy Li Import


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Music

Image of album by The Streets

Photos

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Biography

It’s all of one minute and fourteen seconds into the fifth and final Streets album before you realise that Mike Skinner has found a way of pushing things forward at the same time as bringing The Streets’ story full circle.

Computers and Blues crams everything Mike Skinner has learnt in the course of his very personal five album odyssey into a package as irresistibly box-fresh ... Read more in Amazon's The Streets Store

Visit Amazon's The Streets Store
for 29 albums, 3 photos, discussions, and more.

Product details

  • Audio CD (25 April 2006)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Vice
  • ASIN: B000EQ46KA
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (68 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,188,710 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Prangin Out
2. War Of The Sexes
3. The Hardest Way To Make An Easy Living
4. All Goes Out The Window
5. Memento Mori
6. Can't Con An Honest John
7. When You Wasn't Famous
8. Never Went To Church
9. Hotel Expressionism
10. Two Nations
11. Fake Streets Hats

Product Description

Product Description

Streets ~ Hardest Way To Make An Easy Living

BBC Review

In a world obsessed with the minutiae of D-list 'stars' and their tragi-comic dysfunctionalism, who needs another autobiographical album whinging about the hardships of success? Luckily Mike Skinner, the man who is The Streets, has a more perceptive and honest eye than most.

Filled with tales of self-loathing, drug abuse and the creative wasteland of fame, you might expect The Hardest Way... to be devoid of laughs. Not a chance; songs like "When You Wasn't Famous" (don't snort coke in front of the camera phones, starlets!), and "Memento Mori" (the best retail therapy song, ever) show Mike can still find comedy among the chaos.

His serious points - particularly on "Two Nations" and "Never Went To Church" - seem a little at odds with the very (self-imposed) disposable nature of his work, and his Eminem-style use of nursery rhyme tunes can pall over a whole album. Yet at 39 minutes Skinner's already learned that less is more. And that honesty is still the best policy in the fight against mediocrity. --Chris Jones

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Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By boyo on 12 April 2006
Format: Audio CD
When I first heard Has it come to this I hated it, a few months later I had the album and thought the streets were amazing. When I first heard fit but you know it I hated, a few months later I had the album and loved the streets even more. And when I first heard when you wasnt famous I hated that but now got the new album and at first..............hated it!

3 days later I love it and just feel people dont get it. Theres some class songs on this album; 'momento mori',and 'cant con an honest john' being my fave. Hes rich and famous now and tells his stories that at first may sound like he's showing off really just say its not all its cracked up to be.....

I think street fans'll love it but if you werent a fan before then this wont change your mind!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By M. E. Furse on 10 April 2006
Format: Audio CD
If you were hoping for a repeat of 'A Grand Don't Come For Free' you've come to the wrong house, but if you were looking (as I was) for a repeat of some of the poetic insight of 'Original Pirate Material then this could well float your boat. The Streets third studio album combines much of the winning ingredients of the first releases and certainly appears to have recreated some the magic of 'OPM'. While 'A Grand...' combinbed numerous themes, the common thread here is fame and fortune aren't all they cracked up to be, and while there's nothing particularly groundbreaking, there are certainly some catchy tunes. As with the previous albums, listen to it at least three times before making a call either way.
From the opening pain of 'Pranging Out' (charting the hell that is a Grade A comedown), through to 'Fake Street Hats', there is no real 'Dry Your Eyes' remake anywhere, although Skinner has produced some edgier material and appears to be having a dark night of the soul...he does tip his hat to Johnny Cash in 'Two Nations', and so this may have something to do with it!
While I loved 'A Grand...', I have always thought 'OPM' to be the superior record, and so for me this album delivers in more ways than one. Listening to 'Can't Con An Honest John' there is certainly plenty of the original charm and innovation. It's a tough call but the best track is probably 'Never Went To Church', a heartfelt ode to Skinner's dead father.
The two previous albums have undoubtedly been a hard act to follow, and from the sound of some of the material, Skinner was lucky to get this far!
Despite the criticsms Skinner is still streets ahead (no pun intended) of the competition on either side of the Atlantic, and if you're already a fan, you won't be dissapointed. If you're new to Mikey then check out the earlier material first.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By greg naylor on 10 April 2006
Format: Audio CD
I used to hate the streets when the first single came out, but i was given a grand dont come for free as a joke by a freind as they knew how much i hated them, and i listened to it out of boredom and it was amazing. this album is no where near as good as AGDCFF but it is still quite good, the lyrics are well thought out and funny in places, the beats are fuller than in other albums and it does have decent moments of seriousness like in other albums, this album has become less of a tale of trying to become famous and make money, this album is about having money and the troubles that come with it.
go buy it, you be dissapointed.
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I was lucky enough to have been present when the streets aka mike skinner gave an advance preview of 5 of the album tracks confirmed to be featuring on this album, in the presence of various media outlets, and from the sounds of it, the streets have gone in a completely different direction
Gone are the startling similarities between what Skinner is speaking on the record and the life that you are familiar with, and gone are the accounts of the raw everyday realities of working class britain. in their place are tales of high-flying, glamourised celebrity lifestyles and accounts of being rich and famous. Skinner's wit and bravado remain, but he just doesn't seem suited to the hollywood-style stories he's telling
There are positives, however, this is still The Streets, and as you would no doubt know if you've heard both of the existing albums 'Original Pirate Material' and 'A Grand Dont Come For Free' - Mike Skinner is one of a kind, a unique diamond in a flagging British urban genre, who still has the potential to make a grown man cry ('Never went to Church') and can't help but grin at his wit ('Pranging Out').
Of course I can only base my review on what I've heard, and from what I've heard I can't wait to hear the rest - on the one hand it's exciting to see Mike Skinner move off in a new direction, on the other it's a shame as the everyday reality lyricism is what attracted me and a lot of others to the music of The Streets in the first place.
The bottom line is that The Streets are worth a listen, whatever the subject matter is.
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.. A very good album nonetheless. While not retaining the complete album nature of A Grand Don't Come For Free nor the freshness of the debut this 3rd effort form Mike Skinner and co is a simply a collection of strong songs.
Opener "Pranging Out seems quite throwaway but it's a grower. "War of The Sexes" has a Slight Latin flavour to it, bit of a carnival atmosphere but it may annoy some. Funny lyrics. The title track would work as a single, Really like the production of the beats on this one, very icy.
"All Goes Out The Window" is sung by Leo and is a bit boy band for my tastes. Hopefully it won't be a single. "Memento Mori" is short and probably should be longer, good lyrics. beat is quite sloppy and relaxed. Does sound like it's been mostly recorded on a Casio keyboard but that adds to it's charms. "Can't Con An Honest John" here the backing vocals reminded me of early Destiny's Child. Beat is quite heavy and industrial, an instrumental would almost sound like IDM.
Then comes "When You Wasn't Famous". A great single, one of the best things Skinner has done. I'm sure it's grown on a lot of people buy now. "Never Went To Church" is the albums nearest parallel to "Dry Your Eyes" Real gospel feel to it, pretty obvious with the use of a gospel choir. Most personal lyrics on the album. Quite touching, will likely bring a tear to anyone who has lost a parent. "Hotel Expressionism" is pretty unremarkable stop gap between the emotion of the previous track and the politics of gun control on "Two Nations", it gets political when talking about UK and the US, not as bad as I thought it would be. Good chorus, good lyrics. Music actually reminded me of Radiohead.
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