Buy Used
£0.01
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This book is in very good condition and will be shipped within 24 hours of ordering. The cover may have some limited signs of wear but the pages are clean, intact and the spine remains undamaged. This book has clearly been well maintained and looked after thus far. Money back guarantee if you are not satisfied. See more of our deals.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

A Handful of Dust (Penguin Twentieth Century Classics) Paperback – 24 Apr 1997

6 customer reviews

See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, 24 Apr 1997
£999.11 £0.01



Product details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books Ltd; Revised edition edition (24 April 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 014018886X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140188868
  • Product Dimensions: 12.8 x 1.6 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 604,806 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

About the Author

Evelyn Waugh (1903-1966), whom "Time" called "one of the century's great masters of English prose," wrote several widely acclaimed novels as well as volumes of biography, memoir, travel writing, and journalism. Three of his novels, "A Handful of Dust, Scoop, "and" Brideshead Revisited, " were selected by the Modern Library as among the 100 best novels of the twentieth century. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By MonkeyUK on 31 Jan. 2000
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is excellent, Waugh's dry wit shines through and his observation of society and people is top notch. The plot concerning an old aristocratic family, whose fortune is on the wane is not new, but in this book Waugh explores the relationships between people and mocks the upper class behaviour of the inter war years. The fact that the hero imprisons himself in his aristocratic tomb, before becoming enforceably imprissoned in Brazil is a great joke and women, well this shows them... The book also reflects some of the hard times of the 1930's. First class and hilarious.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By J. R. S. Morrison on 19 Jan. 2000
Format: Paperback
Evelyn Waugh was a master of the dry, cruel, empathetic and funny; this, perhaps the ultimate "innocent Englishman abroad" novel, travels from between-wars infidelity to a bizarre Conrad parody, and is uneasily hilarious all the way. Highly recommended.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Doug Reid on 18 July 2010
Format: Paperback
Evelyn Waugh needs to be read in consideration of the times in which he lived. As someone on the periphery of the Bright Young Things of the 1920s, he was part of a disaffected generation whose fathers, older brothers and uncles had been slaughtered during the First World War. They felt disconnected from the lives and attitudes of their parents and grandparents, whom they felt had made disastrous decisions for the future. The response to these feelings of disconnectedness was to react against everything these generations stood for. Theirs was an era of frivolity, lack of responsibility for their actions, of debauchery and incredible naivety. Is it any wonder then that EW can sometimes seem depressingly cold and cruel?

A Handful of Dust chronicles beautifully and sensitively, lives typical of the Bright Young Things. Brenda Last cares little for the devastation she leaves behind her, in her quest for what she sees as her personal happiness. To me, one of the most telling and mindblowing revelations about her is, on the tragic death of her son John Andrew in a riding accident, she is told of "John's death" and immediately construes it as the death of her lover John Beaver. On discovering that is is not Beaver but her son she exclaims "Oh thank God."

That many of the perceptions and sadnesses EW carefully depicts in this book are as current and relevant today as they were in the 1920s and early 30s, is possibly the reason some may find this book disturbing. Maybe it reflects a rather uncomfortable aspect of their own lives?
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Look for similar items by category


Feedback