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Handel: Gideon [CD]

George Frideric Handel , Joachim Carlos Martini , Junge Kantorei , Frankfurt Baroque Orchestra , David Cordier , et al. Audio CD
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
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Product details

  • Audio CD (31 May 2004)
  • SPARS Code: DDD
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Format: CD
  • Label: Naxos
  • ASIN: B000260QN8
  • Other Editions: MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 261,942 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         


Disc 1:

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
Listen  1. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 1: OuvertureNicola Wemyss 3:550.69  Buy MP3 
Listen  2. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 1: MenuetDavid Cordier 2:210.69  Buy MP3 
Listen  3. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 1: Recitative - Forth from the swarming EastNicola Wemyss 1:060.69  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 1: Soli and Chorus - Comfort us, O LordDavid Cordier 3:140.69  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 1: Recitative - A man, a prophetNicola Wemyss0:170.69  Buy MP3 
Listen  6. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 1: Accompagnato - No wonder, that ye flyDavid Cordier0:340.69  Buy MP3 
Listen  7. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 1: Air - Trembling with horrorNicola Wemyss 3:030.69  Buy MP3 
Listen  8. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 1: Soli and Chorus - Lord, we seek thy blessingDavid Cordier 2:590.69  Buy MP3 
Listen  9. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 1: Recitative - Westward from reverend Jordan's silver streamNicola Wemyss0:430.69  Buy MP3 
Listen10. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 1: Accompagnato: By doubt and shameDavid Cordier 1:120.69  Buy MP3 
Listen11. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 1: Air - Rise with furious EmulationNicola Wemyss 4:050.69  Buy MP3 
Listen12. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 1: Recitative - As thus he sungDavid Cordier0:460.69  Buy MP3 
Listen13. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 1: Air - Thou light of IsraelNicola Wemyss 3:010.69  Buy MP3 
Listen14. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 1: Accompagnato - Let the command sufficeDavid Cordier0:510.69  Buy MP3 
Listen15. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 1: Recitative - He said, and gently stretching outNicola Wemyss0:590.69  Buy MP3 
Listen16. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 1: Solo and Chorus - Immortal God, whose handDavid Cordier 1:380.69  Buy MP3 
Listen17. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 1: Recitative - A Midian princeLinda Perillo0:300.69  Buy MP3 
Listen18. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 1: Air - Mighty Belus, Midian's glory!David Cordier 4:280.69  Buy MP3 
Listen19. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 1: Recitative - This done, he with a chosen party wentLinda Perillo0:580.69  Buy MP3 
Listen20. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 1: Air - 'Tis time, my sons'Joachim Carlos Martini 2:000.69  Buy MP3 
Listen21. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 1: Recitative - Forth from the townLinda Perillo0:390.69  Buy MP3 
Listen22. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 1: Duet - Sweet is conquest disapprovingDavid Cordier 2:430.69  Buy MP3 
Listen23. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 1: Trio - Like a bright cherubLinda Perillo 1:570.69  Buy MP3 
Listen24. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 1: Recitative - Then bowing mildDavid Cordier0:550.69  Buy MP3 
Listen25. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 1: Air - May kind angels still attend theeLinda Perillo 6:340.69  Buy MP3 
Listen26. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 1: Recitative - And thus the choral bandDavid Cordier0:100.69  Buy MP3 
Listen27. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 1: Chorus - Hail, enlivener of our cause!Linda Perillo 2:180.69  Buy MP3 
Listen28. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 2: Recitative - Triumphant to the townKnut Schoch0:490.69  Buy MP3 
Listen29. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 2: Air - How sweet the roseLinda Perillo 1:530.69  Buy MP3 
Listen30. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 2: Soli and Chorus - Great JehovahKnut Schoch 2:520.69  Buy MP3 
Listen31. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 2: Recitative - Th'assembly roseLinda Perillo0:580.69  Buy MP3 
Listen32. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 2: Air - Israel's guardian, sole creator!Knut Schoch 1:080.69  Buy MP3 
Listen33. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 2: Recitative - Silent he march'dLinda Perillo0:540.69  Buy MP3 
Listen34. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 2: Air - Hark, how the winds aroundDavid Cordier 3:070.69  Buy MP3 
Listen35. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 2: Chorus - Destroy these idolsLinda Perillo 1:580.69  Buy MP3 
Listen36. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 2: Recitative - Gideon, preparing nowDavid Cordier0:180.69  Buy MP3 
Listen37. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 2: Accompagnato & Recitative - Not these imperfect ritesLinda Perillo 1:190.69  Buy MP3 
Listen38. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 2: Air - O glorious mortalDavid Cordier 5:530.69  Buy MP3 


Disc 2:

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
Listen  1. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 2: Recitative - At morn rose Baal's PriestLinda Perillo 1:240.69  Buy MP3 
Listen  2. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 2: Accompagnato - No more thus loudDavid Cordier0:310.69  Buy MP3 
Listen  3. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 2: Trio - From the mountain's browLinda Perillo 1:270.69  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 2: Recitative - Here had contention drawnKnut Schoch0:440.69  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 2: Air - Sons of Israel, let not frenzyDavid Cordier 4:180.69  Buy MP3 
Listen  6. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 2: Recitative - The priest still beats his breastKnut Schoch0:480.69  Buy MP3 
Listen  7. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 2: Air - Return! Tumultuous ruin shun!Nicola Wemyss 3:340.69  Buy MP3 
Listen  8. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 2: Recitative - While yet he spakeDavid Cordier0:240.69  Buy MP3 
Listen  9. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 2: Accompagnato - Furious revengeNicola Wemyss 1:280.69  Buy MP3 
Listen10. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 2: Solo and Chorus - All glory be to thee, o Lord!David Cordier 3:340.69  Buy MP3 
Listen11. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 2: Recitative - Sudden the Priest of BaalNicola Wemyss0:360.69  Buy MP3 
Listen12. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 2: Solo and Chorus - Glorious patron! Glorious hero!David Cordier 3:430.69  Buy MP3 
Listen13. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 3: Recitative - Much I applaud, brave youthNicola Wemyss0:450.69  Buy MP3 
Listen14. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 3: Chorus - Let Jehovah by miracle confirmDavid Cordier 4:030.69  Buy MP3 
Listen15. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 3: Recitative - Now, while the multitudeNicola Wemyss0:170.69  Buy MP3 
Listen16. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 3: Accompagnato - Thou sacred, high, unutterable Name!David Cordier0:520.69  Buy MP3 
Listen17. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 3: Recitative - His pray'r was heardNicola Wemyss0:130.69  Buy MP3 
Listen18. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 3: Accompagnato - Once more, my GodDavid Cordier0:490.69  Buy MP3 
Listen19. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 3: Recitative - He spoke, and it was soNicola Wemyss0:180.69  Buy MP3 
Listen20. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 3: Soli and Chorus - Happy NationDavid Cordier 4:300.69  Buy MP3 
Listen21. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 3: Recitative - Now each rous'd soldierNicola Wemyss0:340.69  Buy MP3 
Listen22. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 3: Air - Let the trumpet's sound invitingDavid Cordier 4:210.69  Buy MP3 
Listen23. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 3: Recitative - Let Gideon, our undaunted heroNicola Wemyss0:130.69  Buy MP3 
Listen24. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 3: Air - Tho' now fall'n, dismay'dDavid Cordier 3:490.69  Buy MP3 
Listen25. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 3: Recitative - Thanks to my countrymenNicola Wemyss0:260.69  Buy MP3 
Listen26. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 3: Air - From your idol gods returningDavid Cordier 3:260.69  Buy MP3 
Listen27. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 3: Recitative - Alarm'd by frequentNicola Wemyss 1:290.69  Buy MP3 
Listen28. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 3: Air - In notes of joy we hail the happy dayDavid Cordier 6:460.69  Buy MP3 
Listen29. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 3: Recitative - Ye sons of IsraelNicola Wemyss0:270.69  Buy MP3 
Listen30. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 3: Air and Chorus - Sing and rejoyce!David Cordier 3:300.69  Buy MP3 
Listen31. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 3: Recitative - To meet the heroNicola Wemyss0:360.69  Buy MP3 
Listen32. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 3: Accompagnato - Ye see, that GodDavid Cordier0:520.69  Buy MP3 
Listen33. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 3: Duet - Sweet Peace, from Heav'n descendingNicola Wemyss 7:180.69  Buy MP3 
Listen34. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 3: Recitative - Our hearts their confidenceDavid Cordier0:400.69  Buy MP3 
Listen35. Gideon (compiled by J. C. Smith): Part 3: Soli and Chorus - Wondrous are thy works, O Lord!Nicola Wemyss 7:250.69  Buy MP3 


Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
By J Scott Morrison HALL OF FAME TOP 100 REVIEWER
Format:Audio CD
Billed on its cover as an oratorio by George Frideric Handel, 'Gideon' is, rather, a pasticcio put together by one of Handel's right-hand men in London ten years after Handel's death in 1759. John Christopher Smith the Younger (as distinguished from his father, originally Johann Christoph Schmidt, a fellow musician from Halle who had come to London at Handel's request in 1716) had been a student of Handel's and had helped him in his latter years, particularly after the onset of Handel's blindness. After the composer's death the London audience clamored for still more of Handel's oratorios and Smith obliged first with a pasticcio based on the Old Testament story of Rebecca in 1764. Its success led to the preparation of 'Gideon' which was presented first in 1769.
Approximately 60 percent of the music here is Handel's, taken from various compositions and set to new words written by Thomas Morell who had written librettos for several of Handel's oratorios including 'Judas Maccabaeus,' 'Theodora'and 'Jeptha.' The rest of the music was by Smith the Younger, much of it taken from his own oratorio, 'The Feast of Darius.' The story of 'Gideon' is taken from the passage in Judges that tells of the Israelites besieged by various of their neighbors. Many of the Israelites had fallen prey to the false religion of the Canaanites and had started worshiping Baal. God, therefore, delivered the Israelites into the hands of the Midianites. The oratorio tells the story of their apostasy, their punishment, and their return to the true faith, with corresponding freedom from captivity. Gideon leads his people away from the worship of Baal and back to the worship of God. All ends with rejoicing and celebration, with Gideon the hero of the day.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars THE SHOW MUST GO ON 26 Nov 2004
By DAVID BRYSON TOP 500 REVIEWER VINE VOICE
Format:Audio CD
Handel was long dead when Gideon was put together, but the demand for his special invention the English oratorio continued, so there were ways of satisfying that. Handel's pupil John Christopher Smith (ne Johann Christoph Schmidt) the younger got together with the Rev Thomas Morell, librettist of the master's last two oratorios Theodora and Jephtha, and they cobbled together a `pasticcio', made up partly of music by Smith himself and partly of recycled material by Handel. All the music by Handel here, and some of Smith's, had new words wrapped round it by Morell, the genuine new music being the recitatives and accompagnatos. It was one way of doing things, I suppose.
I want to offer a resounding vote of thanks to Naxos and the performers for this production, whatever its shortcomings. It is a bold and imaginative venture, and I recommend it cordially to all Handelians and to music-lovers interested in musical byways. Most of Handel's stuff comes from Acis and Galatea, from his Dixit Dominus and from four of his nine exquisite German arias (dating from the height of his English period). I own performances of all of these, and the German arias are very fresh indeed in my memory from the marvellous recording by Dorothea Roeschmann. There is another item from his cantata Silete Venti, which I have at least heard, and the other pieces are new to me. I suppose I have to say that the four German aria performances here do not measure up to Roeschmann's by some miles, but that is not the point of this issue, and I did not even bother to remind myself of how Acis and the Dixit Dominus are done on my other records. The performance in general strikes me as a bit of a tumble-through, but a talented one for all that.
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Amazon.com: 3.7 out of 5 stars  3 reviews
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars THE SHOW MUST GO ON 30 Aug 2004
By DAVID BRYSON - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
Handel was long dead when Gideon was put together, but the demand for his special invention the English oratorio continued, so there were ways of satisfying that. Handel's pupil John Christopher Smith (ne Johann Christoph Schmidt) the younger got together with the Rev Thomas Morell, librettist of the master's last two oratorios Theodora and Jephtha, and they cobbled together a `pasticcio', made up partly of music by Smith himself and partly of recycled material by Handel. All the music by Handel here, and some of Smith's, had new words wrapped round it by Morell, the genuine new music being the recitatives and accompagnatos. It was one way of doing things, I suppose.

I want to offer a resounding vote of thanks to Naxos and the performers for this production, whatever its shortcomings. It is a bold and imaginative venture, and I recommend it cordially to all Handelians and to music-lovers interested in musical byways. Most of Handel's stuff comes from Acis and Galatea, from his Dixit Dominus and from four of his nine exquisite German arias (dating from the height of his English period). I own performances of all of these, and the German arias are very fresh indeed in my memory from the marvellous recording by Dorothea Roeschmann. There is another item from his cantata Silete Venti, which I have at least heard, and the other pieces are new to me. I suppose I have to say that the four German aria performances here do not measure up to Roeschmann's by some miles, but that is not the point of this issue, and I did not even bother to remind myself of how Acis and the Dixit Dominus are done on my other records. The performance in general strikes me as a bit of a tumble-through, but a talented one for all that. The recording of the chorus is rather recessed and cavernous at times, but in general the engineering is quite acceptable. Smith seems to me not a bad composer at all, and it is probably a good thing under the circumstances that when the great authentic voice of the master is heard most clearly, as in the choruses Lord We Seek Thy Blessing (reminiscent of the great `darkness' chorus from Israel in Egypt) and Let Jehovah by Miracle Confirm, the contrast between the respective levels of inspiration is not as stark as it would have been in a `better' performance. Morell was a very competent librettist and he really deserves a lot of credit for what must have been a tricky task. Of the soloists, I should say that the bass Stephan MacLeod is not bad at all, and the counter-tenor David Cordier is better than that, with a very striking purity of tone that I would like to hear more of.

It would have been good to be told something about the instrumentalists. In particular, was that a lute or a harp I heard in the overture? Otherwise I want to compliment the production of the booklet, in particular the essay by Keith Anderson. A non-expert craves information when it comes to a work like this, and Anderson not only supplies it succinctly but also summarises the plot, which derives from the Book of Judges and concerns yet another rebuff to the luckless would-be rival deities to Jehovah. The individual numbers are listed first by their titles, second by their sources and lastly with the full text. I am almost ashamed to say that I found myself wondering what Beecham might have done with Gideon, and I banished the thought from my mind as being rank ingratitude. What we are given here, at a very modest cost, is something that most of us were unlikely ever to hear, and something that ought to excite the interest of any music-lover possessed of even a modicum of curiosity. What I can do to support this really admirable venture is to buy it for myself and recommend it as strongly as I am able. I would have loved to give it 5 stars, with the bar lowered suitably, but I don't really think I ought to, despite nearly 80 minutes' worth of music on each disc. Still, I want to commend this issue as strongly as I can to as many music-lovers as I can.
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Handelian Pasticcio by John Christopher Smith the Younger 14 Aug 2004
By J Scott Morrison - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Billed on its cover as an oratorio by George Frideric Handel, 'Gideon' is, rather, a pasticcio put together by one of Handel's right-hand men in London ten years after Handel's death in 1759. John Christopher Smith the Younger (as distinguished from his father, originally Johann Christoph Schmidt, a fellow musician from Halle who had come to London at Handel's request in 1716) had been a student of Handel's and had helped him in his latter years, particularly after the onset of Handel's blindness. After the composer's death the London audience clamored for still more of Handel's oratorios and Smith obliged first with a pasticcio based on the Old Testament story of Rebecca in 1764. Its success led to the preparation of 'Gideon' which was presented first in 1769.

Approximately 60 percent of the music here is Handel's, taken from various compositions and set to new words written by Thomas Morell who had written librettos for several of Handel's oratorios including 'Judas Maccabaeus,' 'Theodora'and 'Jeptha.' The rest of the music was by Smith the Younger, much of it taken from his own oratorio, 'The Feast of Darius.' The story of 'Gideon' is taken from the passage in Judges that tells of the Israelites besieged by various of their neighbors. Many of the Israelites had fallen prey to the false religion of the Canaanites and had started worshiping Baal. God, therefore, delivered the Israelites into the hands of the Midianites. The oratorio tells the story of their apostasy, their punishment, and their return to the true faith, with corresponding freedom from captivity. Gideon leads his people away from the worship of Baal and back to the worship of God. All ends with rejoicing and celebration, with Gideon the hero of the day.

Much of the music by Handel is taken from his 'Dixit Dominus,' 'La Resurrezione,' and 'Nine German Songs.' It is a little unsettling to come upon a patch of familiar music amongst so much that is unknown to the casual Handelian listener. The first of these is the very first chorus, 'Comfort us, o Lord,' which is taken from the 'Dixit Dominus' chorus, 'Dominus a dextris.' Still, the story and the music have a flow that testify to Smith the Younger's skill. The music composed by him is hard to distinguish from that of Handel. He composed all the secco and accompagnato recitatives which move the story along and since they partake of the norms of German/Italian recitative writing they are unexceptionable.

The performance here is by a group of primarily English-speaking singers accompanied by the Junge Kantorei and the Frankfort Baroque Orchestra under the direction of Joachim Carlos Martini. One must say that the soloists, chorus and orchestra all have a slightly rough-and-ready quality which simply points out that this music-making is by humans, not baroque music machines; I find it charming, frankly. The only weak soloist is the countertenor, David Cordier, whose wayward intonation grates and whose voice occasionally threatens to peter out. The booklet notes are exceptionally helpful for sorting out the musical sources of the various movements; a complete libretto is supplied.

In summary, this is probably not necessary for the casual Handelian, but will be snapped up by Handel completists. As far as I know this is a first recording of the piece.

TT=2:31:52, 2 CDs

Scott Morrison
0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good Version of Handel's Gideon 2 Mar 2010
By EFL - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
I enjoyed Gideon. I'm partial to the arias and choruses in Gideon. I think Handel's oratorios "Messiah" and "Sampson" are his best.
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