Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop All Amazon Fashion Up to 70% off Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Shop Amazon Fire TV Shop now Shop Fire HD 6 Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop now
Buy Used
£1.71
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Dispatched from the US -- Expect delivery in 2-3 weeks. Great condition for a used book! Minimal wear. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Shipped to over one million happy customers. Your purchase benefits world literacy!
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Handbook of Technical Writing Paperback – Jan 1996

3 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, Jan 1996
£15.25 £1.71
--This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Save £20 on Amazon.co.uk with the aqua Classic card. Get an initial credit line of £250-£1,200 and build your credit rating. Representative 32.9% APR (variable). Subject to term and conditions. Learn more.



Product details

  • Paperback: 687 pages
  • Publisher: St Martins Pr; 5th edition (Jan. 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312166923
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312166922
  • Product Dimensions: 2.5 x 14.6 x 21.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 2.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

About the Author

Gerald J. Alfred is a professor of English at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, where he teaches business and technical writing. Charles T. Brusaw is presently a business writing consultant for many corporations worldwide. He retired from NCR Corporation after working for twenty years as a technical writer. He has also worked in advertising, public relations, and curriculum development. Walter E. Oliu is Acting Director of the Division of Freedom of Information and Publications Services at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and has taught at Miami University of Ohio and Slippery Rock State University. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Customer Reviews

2.7 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 17 Mar. 1999
Format: Hardcover
Summary: If you already have an adequate writer's handbook, look elsewhere for advice about technical writing. If you are new both to writing in general and technical writing in particular, you could do worse.
The publisher claims that the handbook "is specifically geared to the art of technical communication". Not so. The majority of information here pertains to all writers--for instance, the explanation of the proper use of italics and discussion of the voice, mood, and tense of verbs. Even the examples are general rather than technically-related: the entry for like/as has the example "She took to architecture as a bird takes to nest building", which it is difficult to imagine finding in a computer manual, progress report, proposal, or even correspondence.
Some readers may find value in the longer entries, such as those about feasibility reports, instructions, process explanation, proposals, and various types of letters. These provide an interesting combination of introduction/recap for these topics. However, some of the longer entries are bewildering--for example, there is an entry about interviewing for a job, the presence of which is difficult to justify, particularly as the discussion is not specific to jobs in technical writing.
Several entries are marked with a symbol that resembles a cross between the European recycling logo and the yin/yang symbol. There is no explanation of the meaning of this symbol... unless the reader happens across the entry for English as a second language (ESL). Ouch.
Although this fifth hardcover edition has a 1997 copyright date, some examples betray the book's earlier origin. The examples of typeface quality (under the entry for word processing) shows a very early laser printer.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 18 May 1999
Format: Hardcover
This is billed as a supposed excellent resource for technical writers. Truthfully, this book provides little more than basic mechanics of the English language. When I'm trying to design high-tech documentation for companies like Hewlett-Packard and Intel, I need a book that provides more advice than how to use verb structure and prepositions. It pains me that I have to spend the money to ship this thing back.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 2 July 1998
Format: Hardcover
I'm not a technical writer by trade but I do spend plenty of time as a project manager writing functional and design specifications for software and web sites. This book is a true jewel, providing design, layout, and word usage for all of my documents. It's the book you've been searching for all of this time!!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 44 reviews
56 of 56 people found the following review helpful
Indispensable 12 May 2003
By Todd Hawley - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
As a technical writer, I've found this book to be just that. While it definitely is not a "how to write technical manuals" type of book, the topics and material covered make it well worth having on any writer's bookshelf. And in this latest edition, not only have the editors done another great job, the book's page layout is wonderful. In previous editions, all text and type was in black. In this edition, headings, paragraph titles and diagrams are framed in blue. This seemingly minor change makes the book's material easier to read and refer to.
The book continues to have extensive information about writing-related topics. Everything from proper grammar, to writing reports, to interviewing subject matter experts, how to do Internet research for a writing project, writing newsletters and/or abstracts, interviewing for a job and interviewing a subject matter expert for more information about a subject, writing proposals, and so forth is covered in this book. There's even a companion web site to the book that provides links to online resources for further information.
The book's preface contains what the editors consider their "Five Steps to Successful Writing," and also a "Checklist of the Writing Process," complete with subsections containing listings for (in order) Preparation, Research, Organization, Writing a Draft, and Revision. In fact, a few of the book's numerous entries contain their own "writer's checklist" of things to do. Some subjects have not only a heading, but cross-references to other pages of related topics. For example, if I was interested in learning how to write a proposal, I could go to that listing, and also find reference information on internal and external proposals. There seems to be at times an endless wealth of information about whatever writing topic you are looking for. This book's main strength obviously is how all the book's material is organized.
This is one book every writer should have. Even though it isn't a "how-to-write" book, it's still a "tools for writing" book. I find myself referring to it often when I'm
working on any kind of writing project.
As with past editions, the book's editors have done a wonderful job with this handbook.
124 of 136 people found the following review helpful
There must be better technical writing resources 17 Mar. 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Summary: If you already have an adequate writer's handbook, look elsewhere for advice about technical writing. If you are new both to writing in general and technical writing in particular, you could do worse.
The publisher claims that the handbook "is specifically geared to the art of technical communication". Not so. The majority of information here pertains to all writers--for instance, the explanation of the proper use of italics and discussion of the voice, mood, and tense of verbs. Even the examples are general rather than technically-related: the entry for like/as has the example "She took to architecture as a bird takes to nest building", which it is difficult to imagine finding in a computer manual, progress report, proposal, or even correspondence.
Some readers may find value in the longer entries, such as those about feasibility reports, instructions, process explanation, proposals, and various types of letters. These provide an interesting combination of introduction/recap for these topics. However, some of the longer entries are bewildering--for example, there is an entry about interviewing for a job, the presence of which is difficult to justify, particularly as the discussion is not specific to jobs in technical writing.
Several entries are marked with a symbol that resembles a cross between the European recycling logo and the yin/yang symbol. There is no explanation of the meaning of this symbol... unless the reader happens across the entry for English as a second language (ESL). Ouch.
Although this fifth hardcover edition has a 1997 copyright date, some examples betray the book's earlier origin. The examples of typeface quality (under the entry for word processing) shows a very early laser printer. The text discusses dot matrix, letter-quality, and laser printers-inkjet printers are not mentioned. Similarly, there is no discussion of the writing of software documentation. I was left with the feeling that revision was limited to insertion of new entries (such as the Internet item).
This book is an uneasy compromise between a grammar style guide and a series of short articles on technical writing. I yield to educators to judge whether or not it is suitable for first-year university and college students. My subjective impression is that it does not represent value for money, even for that audience.
33 of 33 people found the following review helpful
A Very Good Handbook for Technical Writing 2 Dec. 1999
By W. Hendrick - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have the 5th edition of this handbook. It is a very good reference book to keep at your desk. Although I would not recommend this as a text book for technical communication, it is a great reference book for anyone that has to write or create documents at work. It is arranged alphabetically by topic, and has a detailed index. This book makes a good supplement to a text book for a college level technical communication class.
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
Handbook of Technical Writing 1 Sept. 2004
By Dr. Joseph S. Maresca - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This volume contains sample letters, sentence structure and

grammatical presentations. The singular, plural, subject,

objective and possessive forms are set forth simply with ample

examples. Even proofreader's markings are set forth. The presentation would be extremely valuable for students, writers,

teachers, businesspeople and a wide constituency of the general

public. It is a good value for the price charged.
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
Excellent Handbook 21 Dec. 2004
By D. K. Atkinson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
As the title implies this is a handbook to be used to supplement another text or for reference when writing. While it is slanted towards technical/business writing, it is an excellent reference for any writer's shelf.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback