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Hamish's Mountain Walk (Non-Fiction) Paperback – Illustrated, 15 Apr 2010


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Product details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Sandstone Press Ltd (15 April 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1905207336
  • ISBN-13: 978-1905207336
  • Product Dimensions: 23.1 x 15.5 x 2.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 139,291 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

About the Author

Hamish Brown is a mountaineer, lecturer, photographer and poet who has written or edited a score of books. Born in Colombo, early travels took him to Ireland, Japan and Malaya. He pioneered outdoor education at Braehead School in Fife, later becoming the County Advisor in Outdoor Education. Breaking bounds he set off in 1974 on the challenge of climbing the Munros in a single effort which led to the classic Hamish s Mountain Walk, which covers not only a remarkable feat but delves deeply into every aspect of the country he loves.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Weedavie on 6 May 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
There're times you've just got to disagree. This is no classic, more of interest because it is a key part of the popularisation of the Munros, but it's not particularly good. It's an account of 112 days climbing all the Munros during a period of very poor weather. Nothing very much happens, he doesn't see that much and a lot of the interest is simply in the logistics.

He's keen on exercising his prejudices. He's a bit of a religious nutter. It's a shame for us atheistical hill-walkers as we descend a hill into a glorious winter sunset that Hamish says our blinkered outlook doesn't allow us to appreciate such beauty. At one point where the weather relents, he walks along stripped down to his underpants and reading the bible. This is an image that has haunted my worst dreams, remembering what skiddies looked like in the '70s.

He is hierarchical in his view of walkers - the highest degree is "gangrel" which he awards to one other walker encountered and to himself. He deplores bagging - strangely, as his trip is all about it. He counts an extra ascent when he retraces his steps on Ben a'Ghlo and reascends Bràigh Coire Chruinn-bhalgain, bagging behaviour of the first order. And he's in the fashion police, bright colours of any sort and he condemns you out of hand.

Go ahead and read the book, it's not without interest. But you want a Scottish hill classic? Try Muriel Gray's First 50, or Tom Patey's One Man's Mountains or WH Murray's Undiscovered Scotland.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Peter on 2 Aug 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A unique account of a classic achievement. Required reading for all who love the Scottish Hills and their rich "provenance".
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By David Mole on 3 Aug 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
An excellent book first read by me shortly after its publication. This copy was purchased as a present for a friend who was going Munro bashing.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Vincent on 12 Jun 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a genuine classic and a must-have for any hillwalker's library. It's much more than an account of the first continuous round of the Munroes, it's a love-song to the Scottish mountains. I particularly like the way in which Brown interweaves stories of earlier visits to particular hills into his main account. Our interactions with the landscape continually add layers of meaning to it for us. My paperback copy, bought over 30 years ago is now falling apart, so I was delighted to be able to buy this edition. Shame that the original appendix on equipment has been omitted - it showed that the light-weight camping ethos was around before this modern craze
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By T. Phillips on 11 May 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I've loved this book since it was first published in 1978. I wore out my 1980 paperback version, regularly taking as holiday reading, annotating it, etc. One of the great things, when it was first published, is that the book was an immediate practical aid to anyone who (like me at the time) was inching their way 'round the Munros. It helped show how a whole chunk of mountains could be grouped together for an occasional massive(say)three week hit. But none of this is to belittle Hamish's original journey, and his information-packed, but charming style. The interesting point was that the book probably served more purposes than he intended, and will still do so.

The reprint is very welcome. Would have been nice if it had come out in hardback, rather than a slightly larger than normal paperback format, but that's just economics, I expect. I find the sets of new colour photos all just a little bland, and regret that the black and whites of the original, many taken on the original Walk, have been dropped. They were somehow more "of their time".

Hamish Brown has written a new introduction. In it he says he has resisted the temptation to tinker with the original text(good), though other than mentioning that they have been dropped, he gives no reason why the original appendices have been deleted. They were very informative, definitely helped placed the walk in its context, and would have been worth the very few pages needed to include them. Just 13 sides. There's now just one appendix ("Corbetts adjacent to Munros") the exact reason for which seems at odds with the decision to drop, say the fantastic bibliography, or fascinating statistics of the Walk, which were included in the original.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Deep Reader VINE VOICE on 11 May 2010
Format: Paperback
Hamish Brown has reproofed his most famous book, correcting some of the spellings and even a few minor points in the text. Added to this he has provided two brilliant sections of colour photographs from over forty years of photography in the hills. His new introduction shines a backlight on the book's uplifting and inspiring effect on hillwalkers and mountaineers, and takes a look into the future. Sandstone Press has done a truly great job by not simply reprinting the book but also setting it in a modern font and serving it up in what they describe as a re-imagining. This is the definitive version of the greatest hill book ever written and it is set to inspire new generations. If you care about the hills, the environment, the outdoors and outdoor education, and the whole Munro and Munro-Compleatist shebang, don't miss this.
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