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Hamilton High: The DUFF Paperback – 5 Apr 2012


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Product details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Hodder Children's Books (5 April 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1444903500
  • ISBN-13: 978-1444903508
  • Product Dimensions: 13.2 x 2.6 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (89 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,642 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Kody Keplinger wrote THE DUFF when she was just seventeen years old, while she was at high school in the USA. She says she thinks there is a little bit of the duff in all of us, and somebody needed to talk about it!

Product Description

Review

Sharp, hot, thoughtful, and searingly honest, The Duff is one of the best young adult novels to come along in a decade. (Elizabeth Scott, US author of the The Unwritten Rule.)

Edgy and compelling. I couldn't put it down! (Simon Elkeles, New York Times best-selling author)

A well written, irreverent, and heartfelt debut. (Publishers Weekly)

Realistic, yet innocent at the same time. (Serendipity Reviews)

Compulsive reading, with a sassy heroine you'll find yourself rooting for against all odds. (We Love This Book)

An earthy, realistic and compelling depiction of teenage relationships and self-image. (booktrust)

An interesting and enjoyable read. (Teen Titles)

Keplinger breathed some new life into the now horribly cliched idea of the love triangle by writing realistically flawed characters. (South Wales Evening Post (Swansea))

Book Description

Designated Ugly Fat Friend: You either know one, you have one, or you are one.

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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Christina on 6 April 2015
Format: Paperback
The DUFF is about Bianca Piper, a teenager who is smart, knows her own mind and is determined to not let slimy man-sluts get to her. Until she meets Wesley Rush, the super hottie who has slept with most of the girls in their school. Bianca can't stand how arrogant Wesley is and when he tells her he's only speaking to her to get her friends attention, and tells her she is the Designated Ugly Fat Friend, her hate only deepens. As her home life becomes increasingly awful, so does her need for distraction and with Wesley hanging around, she soon turns to him to distract her and realizes he's not so bad after all.

Whilst the above synopsis sounds like quite the spoiler, it's actually basically the Goodreads description and the blurb on the book (I think.) The whole book is basically described in the above paragraph and it wasn't much more than that. I hated this book. Actually, to be fair, the book itself wasn't awful - it was the main character I despised.

Bianca started out as a great, strong teenager who knew her own mind and wasn't afraid to say what she was thinking. Then she met a boy. A boy she apparently hated, throughout the entire book yet she kept going back to him. I can understand liking a bad boy, or using somebody for a distraction that you don't initially like on a deeper level, but when a guy calls you ugly and fat? Get the hell out of there. Don't jump straight back into bed with him. Unfortunately, this was the only real thing that happened to Bianca throughout the book - aside from her family issues, and there wasn't any more depth to her and I found that incredibly disappointing. This isn't the best message to send to young girls reading this book and Bianca, quite frankly, should have had a lot more self respect.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Zili Robins on 15 Mar. 2015
Format: Kindle Edition
4 - 4.5 Stars.

I'm not sure how I hadn't already read The DUFF (a massive oversight on my part) but when the opportunity to read the book in time for the UK movie release arose I jumped at the chance.

The DUFF provides a realistic look into the scary and hilarious life of modern teenagers. I wasn't expecting to laugh as much as I did and I really appreciated how Kody Keplinger didn't shy away from the grittier side of being a teen - so yes there's sex, insecurities, jealousy and troubling issues.

Bianca aka the Duff (flattering term I know) has a dysfunctional home life and is brilliantly clinical in her analysis of other teens. She has some great one-liners and her inner snark had me in hysterics. I appreciated the pragmatic approach Bianca takes to her situation and how she embraces being the Duff.

Wesley is an interesting character because he's full of delightful contradictions. When he unleashes the Duff bombshell I seriously wanted to hit him, yet I also felt really sorry for him - he always comes across as being extremely lonely.

My favourite scenes were whenever Bianca and Wes would start their banter-fest or their interesting take on romance. I wasn't entirely sure of the age range because there are several mentions of sex and adult content (but no graphic detail). So I'd probably label The DUFF as mature YA.

The secondary characters are well formed and make a great edition to the series. Bianca's besties Casey and Jessica go a long way to proving how loyal a group of girls can be. Even Toby made me smile and I felt he served a purpose, without ever feeling contrived.

If you haven't already read it, go get Duffed!

I received a review copy.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Maia Moore @ MaiaMooreReads on 14 Mar. 2015
Format: Paperback
I have to say, I was pleasantly surprised how this book turned out. I read it after seeing the film trailer and I had a completely wrong impression of it. From the trailer, it looked like, after being called the Duff, Bianca had a makeover and got hot and won over the cute boy. It looked like a fun film but that wasn't a message I could get behind in a book for teenagers.

That's not quite how it goes in this book. After being called the Duff, Bianca falls for the person who called her it, despite the fact that he is a big man-whore and still insists on calling her Duffy. I did have a problem with this, as I couldn't see how, even if he was providing her with escape, Bianca could let herself fall for someone who called her a nickname based on her being fat and ugly. It just doesn't make sense in my head. If that was me, I would feel hurt and angry that he kept calling me that, and while Bianca does display these emotions, it doesn't stop her going back to him again and again. While I know he wasn't as shallow and awful as he appeared to be, it still didn't make sense to me.

I found the characterisation in the book was often forced upon you: Bianca kept reminding us she was cynical and snappy, that Jess was bubbly and naive, that Wesley was smooth and a creep. It felt like I was constantly being told these things rather than showed, which made the characterisation seem a bit flat. The comparison to Wuthering Heights also seemed shoehorned in and that was jarring.

I'm glad that the overall message of the book wasn't: if someone calls you fat and ugly, make yourself thin and hot. Instead, it leaned more towards: everyone sometimes thinks they're the fat, ugly one, don't let it get you down.
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