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The Hallelujah Trail [DVD] [1965] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]


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Region 1 encoding. (requires a North American or multi-region DVD player and NTSC compatible TV. More about DVD formats)
Note: you may purchase only one copy of this product. New Region 1 DVDs are dispatched from the USA or Canada and you may be required to pay import duties and taxes on them (click here for details) Please expect a delivery time of 5-7 days.

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Product details

  • Actors: Burt Lancaster, Lee Remick, Jim Hutton, Pamela Tiffin, Donald Pleasence
  • Directors: John Sturges
  • Writers: John Gay, William Gulick
  • Producers: John Sturges, Robert E. Relyea
  • Format: Anamorphic, Closed-captioned, Colour, DVD-Video, Subtitled, Widescreen, NTSC
  • Language: English, French
  • Subtitles: Spanish, French
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: Unrated (US MPAA rating. See details.)
  • Studio: MGM (Video & DVD)
  • DVD Release Date: 20 Mar. 2001
  • Run Time: 165 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000056H2I
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 267,113 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Trevor Willsmer HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on 26 Feb. 2012
Format: DVD
There's no shortage of talent in John Sturges' The Hallelujah Trail, one of the sixties trend for epic widescreen comedies that weren't funny, but the result is one of those films that starts off as sporadically gently amusing before becoming increasingly tiresome and ending up just plain boring. Intended as uberproducers the Mirisch Brothers' first big 65mm Cinerama roadshow release, production was a nightmare, with Sturges wearing out a couple of writers before shooting and never coming up with anything anyone liked, star Burt Lancaster only making the picture at a vastly reduced salary to pay off United Artists for budget overruns on previous films he'd produced for the studio, the already lavishly-budgeted film going overschedule due to bad weather and, worst of all, stuntman Bill Williams dying on the last day of production - Friday the 13th - in a stunt with a wagon crashing over a ridge that went horribly wrong and which rather morbidly still seems to be in the film's drawn out and unfunny finale. Critics and audiences roundly rejected the results, and in an attempt to save the film from sinking into the box-office quicksand it shrunk from its original 165 minutes to 156 minutes to 146 minutes to 134 minutes, losing some of the jokes along the way - which is a big problem in a film with as few jokes to begin with as this.

There's some promise in the premise, which sees the miners of Denver faced with a hard winter without whisky pooling their resources to get one big shipment at the urging of Donald Pleasance's sun-bleached whisky-fuelled oracle. This immediately attracts the attention of both Lee Remick's Temperance campaigner and Robert J.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By bernie VINE VOICE on 17 July 2005
Format: DVD
A true to life movie about the trials and tribulations in transporting necessary supplies through the west to save Denver from a most unthinkable drought.

Two major incidences are chronicled here "The battle of Whisky hills" and "the Battle of Quicksand Bottoms."

Crossroads in a sands storm see many groups passing. There is the vital element being driving by striking Irish teamsters, approaching evil temperance females led by troops desperate to get rid of them, Indians including "Sky Eyes" (blue eyes due to irregularity in his ancestry), and last but not least the Denver militia.

The list of actors alone could carry this movie. Martin Landau needs lose watching.

While you are watching this confrontation, be sure to protect both your rears simultaneously.

What does the oracle see? Many things are bout to go awry. Has Cora a change of heart? Col. Gearhart tells Cora to "Get away from my cords." Will there be some interesting solutions? Stay toned for the fascinating conclusion.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mrs. Marilyn A. Rice on 24 Oct. 2011
Format: DVD
I really can't believe Burt Lancaster appeared in this terrible western and this is probably the worst film I have seen him in. It's equivalent to a pantomine and the acting performances are awful to watch and it's hard to believe it was directed by John Sturges, who directed "The great escape" and "The magnificent seven" which are considered as classics. But this movie is known as trash and it's unfunny and embarrassing to watch. Even if you are a fan of Burt Lancaster like me, I warn you not to buy it.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 4 April 2005
Format: DVD
Lancaster is superb as Colonel Gerhard and shows how diverse he is with his acting and the supporting cast is just as strong in what I rate as a first rate comedy which has the perfect mix of humour, story and characterisation.
From the director of Magnificent Seven and with music from Bernstein this movie's got a production team and cast to boast about, and it doesnt waste them. The script is fast paced with great gags that steer away from being cliche, and you as the viewer are never detached from the story or the characters, which really is the hallmark of a great comedy.
I'm 18 years old and love comedy, especially british sitcoms, but there are few big screen flicks that I find to be as 'laught-out-loud' and polished as this.
A hilarious comedy and I guarantee you'll watch it more than once!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Susan Bailey on 6 April 2013
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
A great comedy I would recommend to anyone, It is a film, you can watch with your children, It does not have a car chase but it does have a covered wagon chase that is equal to most car chases.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Bob Salter TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 5 Oct. 2011
Format: DVD
John Sturges made some pretty decent films in his time. I loved his "Bad Day at Black Rock" and even liked "The Magnificent Seven" his inferior remake of Akira Kurosawa's "The Seven Samurai". Quite how he came to make this dull as dishwater offering is a complete mystery to me. Given all the talent that was at the films disposal it still amounts to a big fat nothing. The story, such as it is, involves a shipment of whisky bound for Denver, which is starting to run dry of the hard stuff. This stale premise for a joke also runs dry very rapidly. For a film billed as a comedy western it is about as funny as having a tooth pulled. After 149 minutes of mind numbingly boring action there is a sore temptation to slit ones throat. Ever the optimist I did manage to find one high point which was Elmer Bernstein's typically exuberant and jaunty score. Quite decent singalonga stuff! The rest is utter garbage I am afraid!

Poor old Burt Lancaster really caught a cold with this one. Not quite up there with with his role in Visconti's "The Leopard". That fine actor Martin Landau, remember him as Bela Lugosi in that very funny film "Ed Wood", is embarrisingly misused as an Indian who says next to nothing. The acting is of the slapstick variety, where a bit of eyeball rolling incredulity passes as acting. Compared to comedy westerns like "Cat Ballou" and "Support your Local Sheriff" this one pales into insignificance. That fine actress Lee Remick is also strangely wasted as an attractive champion of the temperance movement. Seasoned support actors Dub Taylor and Robert J Wilke also flush their considerable talents down the pan! British actor Donald Pleasance is cast as a very weird oracle and that excellent actor Brian Keith plays the sort of panto villain who used to get a pie in the face in silent films.
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