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HTML & XHTML: The Definitive Guide (Definitive Guides) Paperback – 11 Aug 2000


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Product details

  • Paperback: 672 pages
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 4 edition (11 Aug 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 059600026X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0596000264
  • Product Dimensions: 17.8 x 3.2 x 23.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,687,486 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Amazon Review

HTML is a familiar FLA (four letter acronym) but what about XHTML? Is it merely a typographical error or simply XML by another name? The readable preface to this book puts us right and there is more detail in Chapter 1 which is also an interesting potted history of the web and web technologies.

HTML (Hypertext Markup Language) is for controlling layout and specifying hypertext links for documents viewed with a browser. The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) controls its standardisation. XML (Extensible Markup Language), also defined by the W3C, is a standard that allows structured data to be presented in a standard way that it can be understood by many different technologies, for example, relational database engines and web browsers. Use of XML for the exchange of data between businesses on the Internet is increasing rapidly. Now, finally, comes XHTML (Extensible Hypertext Markup Language), which is HTML reformulated to bring it into line with the XML standard.

The authors try to instil good habits and style considerations, as well as an appreciation of kumquats (a recurrent theme in the examples). They revile use of the blink tag extension that causes text to oscillate between two colour states and blink, constantly, irritatingly and advocate visiting a wide range of Web sites to learn what works and what doesn't.

The comprehensive coverage of the topic is divided into chapters like Text Basics, Formatted Lists, Forms, Frames and Executable Content. HTML & XHTML: The Definitive Guide is a feature-driven guide to what the languages can do rather than a guide to producing a finished item, but it should help a beginner to make good progress nevertheless, and is written in an approachable style. --Mark Whitehorn

Review

A library that circulates this book may soon find itself
charging a lost item fee, because it can become an
indispensable reference in a short period of time. -- Molly Ives Brower, Internet References Services Quarterly, Vol 6, No 1, 2001

In-depth descriptions of the behavior of every HTML tag on every major browser and platform, plus enough dry humour to make the book a pleasure to read. -- Edward Mendelson, PC Magazine, April 23, 2002

It is a readable, fast moving and a compact book. Those of us with the need for a good reference book certainly appreciate this one. -- Miguel A Sepulveda, linuxfocus.org, Jan 2001

Those of us with the need for a good reference book certainly appreciate this one. -- Miguel Sepulveda, LinuxFocus.org, April 2002

When they say "definitive" they're not kidding. Definitive is defined as "clearly defined or formulated" and that's just what this is. -- Linda Roeder, Personal Web Pages, About.com

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Dewi Morgan on 7 Nov 2000
Format: Paperback
OK, it's not a teaching book. It's not meant to be, it's an O'Reilly book. They have sensible titles like "Learning (subject)" on their teaching books. This is a guide, a reference, as it says on the cover.
And it is the best on the market. By far.
Sure, the Kumquat joke gets old fast. But I've bought all three versions of this, and carry the rip-out reference card from the back of the book around with me.
I am often asked to tackle non-trivial aspects of HTML, where IE can do something, but NS cannot (or vice versa), and I would not feel confident doing so without this book.
The reference card is a wonderful idea! Do more of these, O'Reilly!
The in-depth indexes are also invaluable.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By calezane@xs4all.nl on 10 April 2000
Format: Paperback
Form: large paperback; chapters divided into many headings and subheadings, with references to other (sub)headings in a deliberate attempt to imitate the HTML format; screen captures in B/W. Target audience: anyone wanting to know anything about HTML. Invaluable for beginners, a useful reference guide for the advanced HTML programmer. Content: all known HTML tags, including obsolete ones. Frames, imbedding multimedia files, CSS, the difference between the two major browsers Netscape and Internet Explorer, the basics of Javascript and cgi scripts, a brief chapter on dynamic HTML. The author, following the HTML 4.0 standard, is obliged to constantly inform the reader that the older "hard" tags used by the earliest browsers are to be replaced by CSS, meaning anything under a fast 486 will become useless for netsurfing; but that's just the messager bringing the bad news, and the book lists all tags whether allowed under the new standard or not, as the main purpose is to inform. Personal reaction: I was sent this book by mistake, but was so pleased with it that I bought it. It reads pleasantly, as the author breaks up the information in digestible pieces (and also frequently repeat blocks of information, again to imitate the HTML format) and has a sense of humour. It doesn't go very deeply into cgi scripts and other specialized stuff, but is more than enough for anyone wanting to set up a simple webpage, and a very good and thorough starting point for anyone who wants more.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By lee_steadman@hotmail.com on 12 July 2001
Format: Paperback
This book couldn't have been more perfect for me. I was on the brink of understanding HTML in depth before buying this book. After reading I am now more fluent and more confident in what I use in my pages. I have a more wide spread knowledge of what I can use in my pages with a better understanding of the standards that uniform the web. I am now creating pages to standards - not to browsers.
This book has given me a very opening and logical insight into XHTML and XML.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 8 Sep 1999
Format: Paperback
Musciano and Kennedy's book, is an excellent reference for any Web Author wanting to understand HTML. The Author's explain the HTML 4.0 standard and browser specific extensions that can be used in today's 2 most popular browsers (Netscape and Internet Explorer). If you're going to purchase any one book on HTML this is a definite winner. It includes an overview of Javascript and applet usage and contains detail of using frames and tables to enhance web design - also has a useful reference card in the back of the book which can me removed for ease of use.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 28 Mar 1999
Format: Paperback
This book is well written. It should be used by other computer authors as a template. The English is clear and concise. The examples well documented. The cross referencing enables the reader to get an immediate overview. My sons and I have used many computer books to self-learn and we all agree this is "The Best Ever". Well done.
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21 of 26 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 4 Sep 2001
Format: Paperback
"HTML and XHTML: the definitive guide" will give you a thorough grounding in creating web pages. XHTML, by the way, is just HTML5 - the more mature version of the whizzy dynamic HTML4.
This book does not patronize - not that it's not "for idiots". It doesn't have cartoons, or annoying icons saying "kule stuff" either.
What it does do is to take you through the process of creating websites - from your first steps through to the deep end of HTML. Each element is detailed with sufficient examples; nothing is glossed over. Particular strengths are
are the trickier areas - its treatment of forms, GET and POST, frames, CSS and tables are very clear.
The book is careful to delineate what it deals with and what it doesn't. Although it touches upon Java, Javascript, Applets and server technology, these tend to be pointers to the reader - saying what the various things do, evaluating the options and pointing you to an O'Reilly book to buy!
"Kule stuff" includes the chapter on XML (should be on your resume!), "tips, tricks and hacks", the tag reference summary and some rather excellent history on the internet and all the various parties that try and work together to make it work. It's a neat book - personally, I'm an XML-type who's having to reverse-engineer my know-how down to HTML and it hits the mark for me!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 6 May 1999
Format: Paperback
This book is very useful. Should you need a book that has all aspects of HTML covered then this is your book. None of the descriptions used are beyond anyone except the completely uninitiated. My only criticism is that other (shorter) books will help you learn the basics more quickly.
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