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  • HEAVY HORSES LP (VINYL) US CHRYSALIS 1978
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HEAVY HORSES LP (VINYL) US CHRYSALIS 1978


Currently unavailable.
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Music

Image of album by Jethro Tull

Photos

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Biography

Early in 1968, a group of young British musicians, born from the ashes of various failed regional bands gathered together in hunger, destitution and modest optimism in Luton, North of London. With a common love of Blues and an appreciation, between them, of various other music forms, they started to win over a small but enthusiastic audience in the various pubs and clubs of Southern England. ... Read more in Amazon's Jethro Tull Store

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Product details

  • Vinyl
  • Label: CHRYSALIS
  • ASIN: B0045ZAU4M
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (48 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 950,288 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

36 of 37 people found the following review helpful By Mr. D. J. Rudram on 13 Aug. 2006
Format: Audio CD
Released in January 1978 and very similar in style to its predecessor Songs From The Wood, Heavy Horses to my mind represents the absolute peak of Ian Anderson's songwriting and lyrical genius. If you like brilliant tunes and superb earthy and rustic lyrics concerning amongst other things, Cats, Horses, Trains and little furry folk then this is the album for you. While playing this album you can almost taste the countryside as pure and perfect Jethro Tull tumbles out from the speakers.

With many records there is often a need to only programme in certain tracks so as to avoid poor and tuneless filler material. With Heavy Horses there is no need to do this as it is a perfect set from start to finish.

As far as I am concerned all the songs on the album are tuneful classics. Lyrically though the track 'Journeyman' is extra special and concerns Ian Anderson's observations during a late night train journey. In the song he likens a commuter's black briefcase to a dog sleeping in the draft beside the carriage door. It's genius writing, which is so clever that you can almost believe that you are on that very train. The title track 'Heavy Horses' is also fabulous and builds up gradually to a fine Martin Barre guitar solo which gets things rocking very nicely. Is it Heavy Rock music? Is it Folk? I can't really say as it defies categorisation. Let's just say then that it's perfect Jethro tull of the very best vintage.

So there we have it. A brilliant album and an absolute must for anyone interested in listening to some extremely well crafted music.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By M. Blackwell on 26 Jun. 2009
Format: Audio CD
After the bucolic "Songs from the Wood" album, Tull returned in 1978 with another rural classic which could easily be the soundtrack to a Thomas Hardy novel. Close your eyes, and you are transported back to the Victorian countryside; the farm cat stalking its prey, the shire horses toiling in the fields, and the moths fluttering round the lantern, all under the gaze of the mystical,climate-controlling weathercock.

The two best things about this album are the music and the lyrics. Folk instrumentation a-plenty, but always with a hint of Tull's previous prog days, via Martin Barre's quirky guitar work, and Barriemore Barlow's frenzied percussion. This is particularly evident on the title track - a slow start which builds into a galloping middle section, taking you on a journey with the heavy horses as they finish their work and head home to the stable. As noted by several reviewers, "Moths" is a genuine joy. Acoustic guitar and flute embellished with orchestral passages, creating a sound totally in keeping with the bitter-sweet tone of the lyrics. You have to hear it.

Ah-the lyrics. No,actually, this is poetry. Just reading the words to these songs gives me goosebumps, conveying Ian Anderson's passion for all things rural. How about "In the dark, townsfolk lie sleeping /As the heavy horses thunder by/ To wake the dying city/With the living horesman's cry" (Heavy Horses). Or "Do you fight the rush of Winter/Do you hold snowflakes at bay/Do you lift the dawn sun from the fields/And help him on his way?" (Weathercock). Simple, beautiful, passionate words to accompany some of the finest music I have heard in a long time.

I bought the LP back in '78, and should really have added the CD to my collection a long time ago. So should you. Buy it.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Lewis Hulatt on 27 Feb. 2004
Format: Audio CD
I cannot believe that nobody has yet expressed their adoration of this album on here! Perhaps it just stands for itself.
Personally, I am buying the CD album because my audio cassette tape has worn out. It has been in my car(s) for some years and although I do not claim to play it constantly (Carlos Santana, Jimi Hendrix and The Stones would object to that infidelity), this is an album I never tire of hearing.
It may be odd to see Ian Anderson these days - not the hairy fellow of the days of yore - and indeed a member of Tull changed gender - so the band do embrace change, but some periods and albums define a band. "Heavy Horses" along with "Songs from the Wood" are to me the classic albums that do so for Jethro Tull. In my collection, I may have "Crest of a Knave" and other later Tull offerings, but whatever the good qualities of 'Steel Monkey' or 'Later that same evening' - it is the likes of "Heavy Horses" that get brought out to show what a band blessed with an ear for a good tune, a soupcon of style and a dash of wit can do. A sound apart from the studious folk-rock of Steeleye Span or early Fairport Convention, a uniquely British eccentricity runs through Jethro Tull. Listen to this album and the Heavy Horses of the title are poetically evoked, still there to take you back to a simpler age.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Sparky on 6 Sept. 2007
Format: Audio CD
This is absolutely brilliant folk/prog rock. Every track here stands up on its own and each complements the others forming a flawless whole. There is not one thing that could be improved on. As usual, Ian Anderson's songs are not just good tunes but intelligently worked melodic structures incorporating trademark Tull changes of pace and rhythm, and the band do them justice. The playing and interplaying is breathtaking. I know these people are rock virtuosos but I cannot believe this was put together without a huge amount of development and rehearsal - that is to say, hard work. Listen closely and you will be amazed at the number of parts on some of the tracks; tricky drum and bass patterns dovetailing seamlessly with honking guitar and growling flute on a bed of acoustic rhythm; this is a rock orchestra in action and Ian's inspiration, Ludwig Van, would have been hard pressed to score it better. The lyrics too are exceptional, charming pastoral images and metaphors but also some wry and poignant observations on more modern times.
This is far and away the best thing I have heard from Tull, or anyone else for that matter, and an album I would enter a burning building to save.
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