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Gustav Mahler: Symphony 9

7 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio CD
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: COMPACT DISC
  • ASIN: B000001GK9
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 41,112 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Product Description

I will ship by EMS or SAL items in stock in Japan. It is approximately 7-14days on delivery date. You wholeheartedly support customers as satisfactory. Thank you for you seeing it.

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By nwc on 18 Jun. 2012
Format: Audio CD
The intensity of this apocalyptical performance is not for everyday listening, and its power cannot be appreciated in a casual listening: it demands time (not only whilst the discs are playing, but for a considerable while afterwards) and attention. It was recorded live at a concert in 1981 (apparently with "patching" from rehearsals, though I defy anyone to identify where these occur) but there is no audience noise: at the risk of sounding "hysterical", it was one of those occasions where the rapt audience seemed to hold its collective breath whilst the work enveloped them.

There are more user-friendly recordings of the work - Klemperer, Barbirolli, Boulez, Bernstein (VPO or Concertgebeouw) and Karajan's own earlier studio version are all outstandingly good - but as a rare experience of this awesome, awe-filled, devastating Music, only Walter's Live recording from 1938 is this version's peer.
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By DB on 23 Oct. 2014
Format: Audio CD
I hadn’t listened to this for quite some time, not since my old audio cassettes went the way of all cassettes, and it was very instructive revisiting it. Back as a student in the 70’s I used to think of it as the work of a desperate man – indeed I used to like listening to it when I was feeling a bit down myself (it’s a great consolation when you are miserable to know that there are always people out there much more miserable than you). But now I realise that it’s really only the last movement that is truly sad, and even there the mood strikes me more as resignation than despair.

The first movement is more bitter-sweet, but with dark intrusions and answering rebuffs. The Wikipedia entry suggests that the message was “enjoy life”, but I would take a more nuanced view: “death is inevitable but don’t let it get you down – enjoy life as best as you can anyway.” The entry also describes the movement as having a sonata form itself, but the disc actually breaks it down into eight chapters, and the breaks sound right. Indeed it gives all the movements seven or eight chapters, and nearly all of them have quite clear structures themselves, so I reckon this must be the first fractal symphony!

The middle two movements keep up the theme of defiance and rejection of depression, the second beginning and ending with a country dance, but with more violent material challenging in the middle, while the third, called a Rondo-Burleque is even described as “sehr trotzig” – very defiant.

Why did I interpret it so differently forty years ago? Maybe there was an element of finding what I was looking for. Maybe it was because my view fitted more with the received wisdom back then that Mahler must have been thoroughly depressed at the time that he wrote it, given his life story.
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By Bill Glen on 15 Feb. 2014
Format: Audio CD
I would say this is essential listening, sitting alongside Bernstein, Haitink, Barbirolli, Klemperer amongst others on my shelves. the recording sound for me is a little close up but I adjust to that quite quickly for a performance which is deservedly praised by critics. In particular the finale reveals a powerful concentration I find very moving.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Bernard Michael O'Hanlon on 20 Dec. 2014
Format: Audio CD
Critic-scholar Hans Heinz Stuckenschmidt acclaimed Karajan's live performance of the Mahler 9th as "the greatest recording of all time." This is not untrue. Its grip, magic and vision are incontestable. Nevertheless, a wider decision needs to be made: are you prepared to enlist as Gustav's shrink or confessor? As I perceive it, that's the price of admission to Mahlerian Nirvana - and it's not one that I've ever being willing to pay.

Mahler's self-referential corpus bears an ominous resemblance to a Martyrology. We all know the tensions, dramas and tragedies which inspired - so to speak - the hammer-blows of fate, those corny funeral marches and the scherzo-in-a-microwave jobs. Putting aside - if one can - questions of inspiration, is there no end to the Sorrows of the not-so-Young Gustav? Are we forever condemned to remember his sufferings in the scheme of things? Should one don a robe like the penitents of Spain in Holy Week?

Escape from - if not refutation of - the Mahlerian glue-pot comes not from a fellow composer but from a poet who drowned, American-style, in a swimming pool - Theodor Roethke:

"I was always one for being alone / Seeking in my own way, eternal purpose / At the edge of the field waiting for the pure moment;

O to be delivered from the rational into the realm of pure song / My face on fire / Close to the points of a star.

I learned not to fear infinity / The far field, the windy cliffs of forever / The dying of time in the white light of tomorrow / The wheel turning away from itself / The sprawl of the wave / The on-coming water."

There are many such verses, all of which predicate external address. Therein, the likes of Bruckner, Martinu or Bax are brought into frame.
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