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Guilt Trip: From Fear to Guilt on the Green Bandwagon [Hardcover]

Alex Hesz , Bambos Neophytou
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
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Book Description

2 Oct 2009
‘CSR’, ‘Green’, ‘Ethics’, ‘Fair Trade’, ‘Organic’ are all buttons that marketers are keen to push right now to get us to engage us with their products. Why? Because, amongst many, these issues hit a nerve and our consciences can be comforted in the knowledge we are purchasing for the greater good.  Guilt Trip talks to the history of the marketing communications story, analyses the journey of traditional advertising techniques past and present and tackles the exploitation of guilt and fear . The authors talk with leading marketers and advertising agency heads, politicians and consumers, doctors and historians to explore the pivotal role played by the Green phenomenon within this transformation. Going further, it asks how companies, politicians and individuals will react to this emerging but irrevocable change, and what will be the fate of those who react too slowly, or ignore it altogether.

Product details

  • Hardcover: 284 pages
  • Publisher: John Wiley & Sons; 1 edition (2 Oct 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 047074622X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0470746226
  • Product Dimensions: 23 x 15 x 3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,237,634 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Review

′A provocative, vibrant, panoramic review of the way we live –and shop– today. Hesz and Neophytou pose fundamental questions about the role of fear and guilt in modern consumption and marketing.′  – Jim Carroll, Chairman, Bartle Bogle Hegarty   ‘The biggest economic downturn in our lifetimes has clearly highlighted the limitations of the plc model that has been the basis of our western economy for generations. However, this thought–provoking, well–written analysis shows that there are viable sustainable alternatives, which should be considered as we move to a post recession world.’ – Patrick Allen, Marketing Director, The Co–operative Group     ′A hugely entertaining analysis that cuts through the rhetoric and offers new insights into the causes and cure for greenwash.′ – Mark Line, Executive Chairman, Two Tomorrow’s Group

  ′A provocative, vibrant, panoramic review of the way we live –and shop– today. Hesz and Neophytou pose fundamental questions about the role of fear and guilt in modern consumption and marketing.′  – Jim Carroll, Chairman, Bartle Bogle Hegarty   ‘The biggest economic downturn in our lifetimes has clearly highlighted the limitations of the plc model that has been the basis of our western economy for generations. However, this thought–provoking, well–written analysis shows that there are viable sustainable alternatives, which should be considered as we move to a post recession world.’ – Patrick Allen, Marketing Director, The Co–operative Group     ′A hugely entertaining analysis that cuts through the rhetoric and offers new insights into the causes and cure for greenwash.′ – Mark Line, Executive Chairman, Two Tomorrow’s Group ‘…a wide–ranging review around the evolution of mass communication (and the consumer)…’ (Admap, March 2010). ‘…presents a compelling critique of organisations’ attempts to assuage their customers’ guilt about green issues.’ (Edge, March 2010). ‘…thought–provoking and funny with many enjoyable passages. Definitely worth a read.’ (B2B Marketing, May 2010). ‘…a very readable study…an amazingly up–to–date book with examples that are still very current.’ (Green World, Spring 2010).

Review

"A hugely entertaining analysis that cuts through the rhetoric and offers new insights into the causes and cure for greenwash".

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Unputdownable 23 Oct 2009
Format:Hardcover
A very well written, engaging read from Hesz and Neophytou. Anyone interested in climate change and the effect we're all having the world will find this incredibly interesting and thought provoking. But more importantly this is an enjoyable and fast paced book with very well researched real life examples that will facinate and educate.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Really interesting, funny, and easy to read 21 Oct 2009
Format:Hardcover
Anyone interested in how we make decisions about shopping or politics, or in particular things to do with the environment, will love this. It's really unexpectedly easy to read, and actually very funny in places - not the usual dry marketing rubbish or hippy ranting. Also it seems cheaper on Amazon!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Crisp and clear and full of killer anecdotes 17 Jan 2010
Format:Hardcover
Thoroughly enjoyable book, laced with the exhuberant hyperbole of youth.

Some cracking examples - the neo-Nazi Lonsdale story is worth the price of admission alone.

You won't agree with everything, but you'll enjoy the ride.
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Amazon.com: 3.0 out of 5 stars  1 review
3.0 out of 5 stars Explains the transition from a culture of fear to a culture of fear + guilt 19 Feb 2011
By B. Dagiantis - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
The authors do a great job of explaining how we've moved from a culture of fear to one of fear + guilt. This is a great book for anyone interested in the green/sustainability communications tactics unfolding around us. Below are my notes from the entertaining intro. The overarching theme of the book is that we've moved from, "Oh God, what are we going to do?" to "My God, what have we done?".

As far as we were able to understand, this enormous rip (Ozone) in our world was the unfortunate by-product of a perfectly innocuous obsession with air freshener and deodorant and the like, products so benign in their intentions that we couldn't have imagined them in the least bit damaging. All we had wanted, after all, was for our world to smell nice. And so, how were we to have known? We weren't to have imagined that our touch of living-room alpine would so maul our planet, but we were waking up to a new era. An era of dying pandas and rising sea levels, of melting ice caps and El Nino and Tsunamis. An era where Godzilla no longer ravaged New York on the big screen, but instead scientifically plausible floods and hemispheric snowstorms tore along Fifth Avenue fossilizing Prada handbags and miniature dogs in one.

Afraid of looking worse than Madonna? Use this face cream. Afraid of being a corporate square? Go find yourself in majestic India. Afraid of religious fanaticism (Islam)? Vote Bush. Afraid of religious fanaticism (Christianity)? Vote Obama. For everything we could be afraid of, there was something or someone there to make us feel better, and all we had to do was buy it, vote for it or believe in it.

From marketing to politics to science, those responsible for influencing minds en masse had come to realize that explaining an upside was nowhere near as powerful as promising the removal of a potential downside. There was a new and pervasive culture in communications and a new king on the rhetorical block: Fear.

9/11 guaranteed its place at the center of politics for a generation further. Bird flu, foot-and-mouth, bluetongue disease, Asiatic avian flu, Mexican swine flu and Jaime Oliver's tirade against Turkey Twizzlers had us scuttling with glee to the organic aisle in Tesco and there was, quite astonishingly, a run on Boots for anti-aging crème when a credible article appeared suggesting it might actually work. People were, in that delightful instance, scared to miss out on the product that answered their fears of looking like their mothers.

This new fear seemed to elicit a subtly different reaction from us than its predecessors and contemporaries. Where once we had looked at the shrinking seas of Central Asia and tumbling Arctic ice-shelves and foreseen our doom, predictably shrieking "Oh God, what are we going to do?" And scattering the tiny boxes at B&Q in search of the energy-efficient light bulbs that were to be our salvation, more and more we were beginning to react in a different way. We were starting to ask a different question. "My God, what have we done?"
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