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Guide to Postproduction for TV and Film: Managing the Process Paperback – 1 Nov 2002

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Product details

  • Paperback: 374 pages
  • Publisher: Focal Press; 2 edition (1 Nov. 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0240805062
  • ISBN-13: 978-0240805061
  • Product Dimensions: 17.8 x 2 x 25.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,103,448 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Product Description

From the Author

Finally, a book on the entire postproduction process!
Until now, a book laying out the entire postproduction process had not been written since the early '80s. Much has changed since then.

Our goal is to teach people how to successfully post their show and not go insane along the way. Postproduction can be a very long, complicated process. Our book follows the postproduction process step-by-step, in the order the work should be done to be most cost-effective and efficient. We've provided many forms and practical tips, along with enough technical information to allow for informed decisions. The (3) scenarios: film-to-film, film-to-tape, and tape-to-tape are covered for each step. We wrote in non-technical terms and even threw in a bit of humor and our own post-experience anectdotes.

Feedback has been great. Many of our sales have been repeat business from people, postproduction facilities, labs and production companies who keep loaning out their books and not getting them back! --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.


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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
A good book for those who want to know how to manage the process of production and post production. Contains tables, flow charts and practical lists. Be aware, reader, that this book does NOT contain editing theory and/or aesthetics.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 13 reviews
22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
A comprehensive production/post production management tool 9 Sept. 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A good book for those who want to know how to manage the process of production and post production. Contains tables, flow charts and practical lists. Be aware, reader, that this book does NOT contain editing theory and/or aesthetics.
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
TV-centric 5 Feb. 2003
By MarauderTrent - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Don't let the title fool you. This book is mainly about making TV shows in L.A. The aspects of film postproduction are merely added-on as an afterthought and go into no great detail. Those wanting to get serious about film postproduction and learn the "nuts and bolts" of it should definitely look elsewhere.
"Managing The Process" takes a systematic "how to" approach to postproduction. It takes you by the hand and tells you what to do but doesn't explain why things are done a certain way. This makes it a good guide to finishing network shows, but not much else. People working outside television and the Hollywood system are left to figure it out for themselves.
If you're in production and want an overview of how postproduction is done, I guess you could find this book useful. I wouldn't recommend it as a reference to anyone who is serious about getting into postproduction. Depending on your field, there are books that go into much greater detail on either picture and sound editing, tape and film post, or running an editing room.
If you want to learn about making films and need a true reference book that will be useful for years to come, then get Dominic Case's "Film Technology in Post Production". On the other hand, if you aspire to get into the mind-numbing world of network series and made-for-TV movies, then "Managing the Process" is the book for you.
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
An Excellent Handbook 12 Mar. 2003
By Kumari Bakhru - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The Guide to Postproduction for TV and Film: Managing the Process is an excellent resource for anyone working in the entertainment industry. I haven't been able to find another book that so effectively takes you through the nuts and bolts of post production, from scheduling all the way through to delivery. If you are an entertainment executive, a film student, or anywhere in between, this book will be an invaluable resource. I've been working in the film and television industry for twelve years and this book has helped me in jobs at two major television networks and in feature post production at several studios. The new edition provides accurate and up to date information and is the only book I've been able to find that adequately covers the film laboratory. The Guide is the one book I always have at my desk. I strongly recommend it.
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Post-Production Bible!!!! 22 April 2003
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Susan Spohr and Barbara Clarke have created nothing short of a post-production bible. BRAVISSIMO to them both!! I would not have survived the last year in my job without their brilliant book!!! Everything flows in a clear, concise way, bringing the reader visually into the post-production process. Read this book and keep it with you as a reference tool! I guarantee you it is well worth your time!
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Unsatisfactory Text 14 Sept. 2011
By truefeather77 - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I had this as a textbook for a film class at UCLA. I used it mostly for the post-production process of the film itself, and found the writing extremely confusing. It seemed an excellent summary for people who already know the material, and who therefore don't need the book. If you don't know it all already, it was a poor explanation. I had to look everything up on the internet to figure out what they were saying.

Part of the problem (certainly not all) stems from the use of ordinary words in unusual ways, in the film industry. We say "Film", for instance, when we mean the product, even if it's digitally recorded. Often it isn't film anymore, it's a disk or a cassette, or an external drive. But the writers of the book need to be aware of this in their descriptions.

This should have been subjected to beta-readers -- people who don't already know the material, and who could point out areas of confusion. But apparently it was circulated to friends, also in the business, who were not able to put themselves into the position of a newcomer, and see it with new eyes.
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