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Guardian Style Hardcover – 6 Nov 2007

3.9 out of 5 stars 17 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 362 pages
  • Publisher: Guardian Newspapers Ltd; 2Rev Ed edition (6 Nov. 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0852650868
  • ISBN-13: 978-0852650868
  • Product Dimensions: 14.7 x 3.4 x 22.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 566,982 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

"'This stuff matters. Rules do not limit; they liberate' John Humphrys"

Book Description

A completely revised and updated edition of the Guardian's indispensable guide to good style, used by journalists at one of the world's most stylishly written and edited newspapers --This text refers to an alternate Hardcover edition.

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Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I'm almost scared to write a review of Guardian Style (or guardianstyle, a title style which they should abandon because it's no longer very stylish), or indeed of anything else, having perused it and scored about a 20% failure rate on all those bleeding obvious traps I thought I'd so cleverly avoided over the years, and that only the ill-educated could possibly continue to get wrong. It combines 1950s schoolmarm (I'm sure that must be unacceptable for all kinds of reasons), Stephen Pinker's beloved language mavens, some amusing and rather touchingly resigned pieces on usage that is just too complicated for most of us and which we should therefore abandon to professional philosophers (`begging the question' is a good example), and an assorted pile of linguistic and spelling horrors that have slimed under the door and into the everyday writing of most smart alecs, including myself (cusp, immaculate conception - how could we have got that so wrong for so long? - epicentre, lay waste ...). The list of cliches (no accent please) is bound to include several that you thought were nothing of the sort - actually rather clever, really - and the glib, sloppy, pompous and woolly are sought out and their necks shaken vigorously.

Sadly, it seems as if the motley Guardian writing crew never seems to learn these lessons (which is always encouraging for us amateurs), but surely this is an area where technology could be the salvation of the daily corrections column: shouldn't all copy be automatically fed through the style guide, to emerge wholesome, non-judgmental, comma-perfect and with everyone's titles, in all their gruesome complexity, fully consistent?

By turns it charmed, intrigued and frightened me.
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Format: Hardcover
While it sounds dry and obvious to say that this is the guide to grammar and word usage for the newspaper The Guardian, that is what this is.

However, the result is far far more compelling and enjoyable than the description. This book is like a mad cross between the 'Grammar is important' ethos of Eats Shoots and Leaves and the random fun of Schott's Miscellany and is better than either.

While I could continue to describe the contents of the book, citing my favourite entries, whatever I say is going to sound boring. Trust me, if you enjoy language you will enjoy this book a lot (not alot).
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Format: Hardcover
For some time I have wanted a style guide that matches my own preferences. A single book to rule them all, and to replace my own rapidly-growing style document. Every time I pick a style guide up and flick through it I'll find an entry recommending something that looks inelegant or counter-intuitive or inconsistent. The point of a style guide is to standardise things; by standardizing a style, you promote a standard for language.

After flicking through Guardian Style I thought my search was over. At first glance it seemed sensible and comprehensive. And it is the guide for a Manchester newspaper, which earns bonus marks. So I bought it. Today I finished reading it from cover to cover, as is my wont. Sadly, although often interesting, it turns out that my search must continue for a style guide that I can accept.

What made me unhappy with Guardian Style?

Firstly it was the lack of internal consistency, meaning that they end up needing 50 entries when a single rule applied throughout would have been much more … stylish. And required only one entry, saving a lot of time. Here are some examples of this inconsistency:
Acronyms and capitalisation. They use lower case for search engine optimisation, but SEO for the acronym. So you would think that a term which is capitalised would also have capitals for the acronym, but that isn't the case: the Guardian uses Soca (not SOCA) as the acronym for the Serious Organised Crime Agency. Some acronyms are not capitalised at all e.g. sim for subscriber identity module. See also their entries for Wap, Unesco, UNCHR. Sometimes capitalised terms get lower case acronyms, and vice versa. There is no rule as to whether acronyms are fully caps, no caps, or initial caps.
No consistency in what types of nouns are capitalised.
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Format: Hardcover
For a foreigner or an English stududent, in order to better your skills, I recomend to use this book. It is a good, and at some points funny, way to deep inside the Enlish language. In addition, I will personally start the university in Manchester, and I am originally from Spain. That could be a disadvantage but not for me nor my interests because with this book, I will make my understanding of the language with more accuracy.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
It doesn't matter if you're in a word-based trade or still in education, this is an absolutely essential purchase for anyone who needs to write good current English. It's clear, easy to follow, and full of really good advice about avoiding cliches.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I agree with all the praise for the style guide. But I do wish they hadn't chosen to print it on that horrible scratchy paper that sets my fingertips on edge every time I consult it.
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Format: Hardcover
An honest, readable directory of how to write well. The Guardian encourages accurate writing, and gives excellent advice on abbreviations, spelling, punctuation and other necessities. While I have a few issues with The Guardian (why do they insist on calling Bombay 'Mumbai', the local right-wing nationalist name for the city, while continuing to call Myanmar 'Burma'?) but generally, the guide is consistent and sensible.

The Guardian has always encouraged intelligent journalism, and this volume not only contributes to good style, it is also the sort of book you can study for hours.

A great guide. Please Daily Mail journalists, read this. Not only will it make your articles more readable, it will also improve your general knowledge. Then maybe one day, you could get a job with a proper, grown-up newspaper!
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