£15.99
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Temporarily out of stock.
Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we dispatch the item.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Growing Up in the Gorbals Hardcover – Large Print, 15 Oct 2003


See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover, Large Print
"Please retry"
£15.99
£15.99 £0.54

Trade In Promotion

--This text refers to the Paperback edition.


Product details

  • Hardcover: 390 pages
  • Publisher: Magna Large Print Books; Large Print edition edition (15 Oct 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0750520590
  • ISBN-13: 978-0750520591
  • Product Dimensions: 21.8 x 14.5 x 2.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 4,476,657 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

"'... a classic... he caught both the people and the place... and there are passages which stand comparison with Zola and Gorky. The Observer" --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

By J.L. Marfany on 1 Dec 2014
Format: Paperback
There is one very serious problem with this trilogy: it's dubious truthfulness. The point was made back in 1988 by Frank Kermode, reviewing 'Gorbals Boy at Oxford' in the London Review of Books. Rather tellingly, not a pip came out of Glasser in reply. There are already some disquieting things in the first volume, particularly the at the very least grossly exaggerated Spanish adventures of the author's Communist friend Bernard Lipchinsky. In his thesis for the University of Sydney 'Mere Sympathy is not enough: Glasgow and the Spanish Civil War (2012, pp. 27-28), J. Fraser Raeburn found no record of such a person amongst Glasweginas in the International Brigades, nor of anyone answering his description amongst those assigned to the security services within the Brigades. But it's the second volume that is full of suspicious incidents and barely credible characters. More generally, Glasser remains extremely vague on many important matters throughout the trilogy: there is not a single date in the whole of it, the chronology of events is always very confused, we never find out what exactly he did or studied at Oxford (not even which college he attended), his subsequent professional career is also no more than very vaguely hinted at, and so on.

This is not the only disturbing aspect of the book. Glasser carries also the hugest ever chip on his shoulder and goes through Oxford denying everyone (Crossman, Cole, Beveridge, later on, outside Oxford, Gollancz and Laski, as well as Orwell) any right to speak for the working class and allegedly seeing through them and their petty personal agendas--without ever doing anything or even putting forward any alternative proposals of his own.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Katherine Pathak on 21 April 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I read this collection as research for a novel and became quickly enthralled by the author's sometimes harrowing but ultimately uplifting story. It is essential reading for anyone who wishes to understand the poverty and hardship that existed in the slums of every British city on the eve of World War Two. It also catalogues the tremendous achievements of those who found themselves able to rise above it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By A. Browne on 25 Jun 2012
Format: Paperback
I read this book because I knew the area as a child in the 60s. I found the jewish eastern european experience to be that of a different community, that had seemed to have moved on from the area . I suppose they had moved to better areas in socio economic terms. I found parts of the book to be very interesting and quite vivid. At other points the author gets almost philisophical and I got fed up, the book seemed to be drowning under it's verbiage. Another reviewer draws parallels with Jeff Torrington's "swing hammmer swing" I dont see the connection other than cities. The latter book is far superior in my opinion. This book seems to me to be a product of it's time, reading it as memoir of another time and place , it seems sadly dated.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback