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Grinny (Puffin Books) Paperback – 27 Mar 1975


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Product details

  • Paperback: 96 pages
  • Publisher: Puffin Books; New edition edition (27 Mar 1975)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140307451
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140307450
  • Product Dimensions: 11 x 0.6 x 18 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 406,151 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 14 Jan 2001
Format: Paperback
Grinny
Author: Nicholas Fisk
Publisher: Puffin Books 1975, 1996. Book also published by Harper Collins in 1984.
My Book Review on Grinny
by Joshua Atwell-Skevington age 10, 14/1/01
First of all, soon after its release to public eyes in 1975 Grinny became a lot more than just a book!
In 1983 Grinny was adapted to theatre. The same happened in 1991 and like its predecessor it became a sure-fire hit! The book even travelled to the big screen in 1987.
If all of this seems a bit too garish to you then just reading the book will tell you that though slightly early and primitive, Grinny is an excellent science fiction title!
This book is set around a boy called Timothy Carpenter, his sister Beth and his best friend Mac (Steven) Rainier. The text itself is written in the first person, by Timothy. To be precise, the whole story is actually Timothy's diary.
At the beginning of the book, a woman who her parents say is called Great Aunt Emma turns up on the Carpenters' doorstep.Tim's parents don't seem to remember a Great Aunt Emma but as soon as GAE (what Tim starts to call his Great Aunt near the begining of the book) gets the phrase 'You remember me' out of her mouth Tim's parents suddenly remember 'Great Aunt Emma'. Tim realises after a short time that something isn't right. GAE has brilliant short term memory but she can't remember what a conquer is....
Timothy is the main character in the story. I think that he is sensible and not reckless like Beth. Here is some dialogue from one meeting of the GCG that I think proves my point adequately:
Beth: I vote we kill her. Tonight.
Tim: Killing her proves to Them, whoever They are that we've got a limited amount of power - but only limited.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By shygirl on 28 Nov 2010
I listened to this audio book on tape over and over as a child, so finding it available to download was a trip down memory lane. The story is as chilling and entertaining as ever, with one of the most inventive and original sci-fi villains around. The narrator, 11-year-old Timothy Carpenter, is a perfect mix of childishness and pretension (he evaluates his dad's sherry and sets much store by correct grammar). And the whole thing is deliciously brought to life by Andy Crane of CBBC Broom Cupboard fame.

I remember loving this audio book from around the age of seven - the same age as Tim's little sister Beth who is the real hero of the story. It is a bit scary, though, so it depends on the child. If you're considering it as an adult, if you remember Ed the Duck with fondness then go for it, you'll get all nostalgic over Andy's familiar accents.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Joshua Winning on 22 July 2013
Format: Paperback
One of the scariest books I've ever read, Grinny is pretty much where my obsession with skin-crawling chillers began. I'm still in awe of Fisk's ability to turn ordinary things into things that absolutely terrify. Though I've not read it in years, the thought of Grinny still gives me chills.
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By Cakey on 6 Mar 2008
Format: Paperback
I have just read an extract of this book to an enraptured class of children. They loved it and were totally absorbed. The way that tension is built through details about Grinny that aren't quite right is really effective and imaginative. Enjoy!
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6 of 9 people found the following review helpful By "horrorfilmbuff" on 4 Nov 2001
Format: Paperback
Grinny is one of those books that you read once, forget about it, read it again, then love it. It's a science fiction classic, about the way children have to cope with a serious dilemma where the parents are completely useless.
Great Aunt Emma (A.K.A Grinny) comes to stay, but soon the children, brother and sister Tim and Beth, and Tim's best friend Mac, start to suspect that Grinny isn't all she seems to be. She's scared of electricity, has metal bones (There was no meaty stuff, just lots of metal rods! - Quote Beth) and she glows at night.
Then as the tension grows, the kids spot Grinny's weaknesses, and use them in a brilliant showdown of Good vs Evil.
This is brilliant, buy it.
P.S. If you enjoy this read it's sequal 'You remember me!' also by Nicholas Fisk.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 25 Oct 1998
Format: Paperback
I remember this book from pre O-levels. A Granny comes to visit - but all is not as it should be.
Adults impervious, children suspect. Marvellous, evocative writing.
"You remember me."
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