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Greystoke - The Legend Of Tarzan, Lord Of The Apes [VHS]


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Product details

  • Actors: Christopher Lambert, Andie MacDowell, Ralph Richardson, Ian Holm, James Fox
  • Directors: Hugh Hudson
  • Writers: Edgar Rice Burroughs, Michael Austin, Robert Towne
  • Producers: Hugh Hudson, Garth Thomas, Stanley S. Canter
  • Language: English
  • Classification: PG
  • Studio: Warner
  • VHS Release Date: 16 Aug 1993
  • Run Time: 129 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00004CJ67
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 200,317 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

Period action adventure set in the late 19th century, directed by Hugh Hudson ('Chariots of Fire'). Christopher Lambert stars as Tarzan of Greystoke, who as an infant was orphaned on the west coast of Africa following a shipwreck, and was rescued and brought up by a family of highly-evolved apes. Twenty years later, a Belgian hunter, Captaine Phillippe D'Arnot (Ian Holm), encounters the man who has now become Tarzan, Lord of the Apes when the ape-man rescues him from a terrible death. When the Captaine finds evidence to prove that Tarzan is the direct descendant of the Earl of Greystoke, he takes it upon himself to return the man to civilization. But Edwardian England is very different to the wilds of the African jungle, and Tarzan finds himself torn between two irreconcilable worlds...

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By R. Baird on 14 Jan 2010
Format: DVD
A GREAT CLASSIC VERSION OF THE TARZAN STORY.
I TOOK MY STEP SON TO VISIT GREYSTOKE HOUSE IN THE LAKE DISTRICT A FEW WEEKS AGO, I AM NOT SURE IF ITS THE RIGHT GREYSTOKE, BUT IT MADE ME TELL HIM THE LEGEND AND STORY OF TARZAN, HE IS 10 AND HAD NEVER SEEN THIS MOVIE, AND KNEW VERY LITTLE ABOUT THE STORY, SO I BOUGHT THE DVD. HE LOVED IT, JUST AS MUCH AS I DID WHEN I FIRST SAW IT. ALSO AS WE HAD VISITED THE NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM IN LONDON LAST SUMMER, IT WAS ALL VERY RELIVENT.

A FAB FILM, FOR ALL THE FAMILY TO ENJOY, IT HAS AGED FAIRLY WELL, AND IS A GREAT YARN TO BE ENJOYED ON A WET SUNDAY INFRONT OF THE FIRE.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Rich Milligan on 3 July 2005
Format: DVD
For me this is the definitive Tarzan film, no other adaptation of the Edgar Rice Burrows books comes anywhere near and for pure authenticity reasons alone this film is a superb version.
What, I think, makes the film so good is its very subtle, almost subdued angle on the Tarzan legend. There's no beating of the chest and vine swinging acrobatics. There's no wrestling with crocodiles or "Me Tarzan, You Jane!" dialogue. Instead it takes a very realistic approach, giving real thought to how a human raised by apes might behave. It is also a very obvious forerunner of the some of ecological thoughts that we now take as part of everyday life. Who is the savage in the film? The Apes or the Victorian population? Is our society really any advanced from the wild in terms of respect for others or in terms of cruelty?
The performances of the various actors are with one exception, superb. Christopher Lambert was perfectly cast as the taciturn, sad eyed Tarzan. He brings gentle steel to the role and he virtual "unknown-ness" at this point in his career was a boon. Ian Holm is likewise excellent as the explorer who finds Tarzan, Phillippe D'Arnot. Ralph Richardson quite possibly steals the show with such a tenderhearted performance as the Earl of Greystoke and fully deserved his posthumous nomination for an Oscar. As I say the one blimp on the landscape is that of Andie MacDowell. I scratch my head every time I see her in any lead role and still cannot for the life of me figure out why she has had such a successful career, even though nowadays we mostly see her in the advert breaks! It's not surprising her voice was dubbed over by Glenn Close, it's just a shame she wasn't replaced totally.
One final plaudit for the film is the superb costumes and actions of the apes.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Michael Ings on 12 Oct 2004
Format: DVD
One of the most popular figures of (pulp)fiction and the movies was finally taken seriously in 1984's epic Greystoke. Having read all 24 books- more than once- and grown up on the B-movie Tarzans fron Johnny Weissmuller to Mike Henry, and not forgetting the 6os TV Tarzan Ron Ely, I remember how excited I was when the Greystoke project was announced. Was I happy with the result? Well yes and no. The film looks fantastic - the jungle scenes are atmospheric and beautifully filmed. The apes were a revelation and still look good today despite the onset of CGI effects. Christopher Lambert was supremely well cast in the title role, a good decision to move away from the muscle-bound image of the character, and he brilliantly portrays the central dilemna of a man caught between two very different worlds. Best of all is Sir Ralph Richardson, in his last screen role, as Lord Greystoke - Tarzan's grandfather. My only reservation really was the overriding bleakness of the film. Tarzan is orphaned early on,loses his ape mother to hunters' arrows, his grandfather and his ape father. Apart from Tarzan, Jane, D'Arnot and Lord Greystoke everyone seems particularly dislikeable, selfish and seedy as "civilisation" is found wanting alongside the lore of the wild. It all becomes rather over-wrought and melodramatic. That said, I would heartily recommend the film as it raises the story to a higher level and tackles some weighty ideas. Having waited so long for its tranfer to DVD it is a pity that so few extras are included. The film is the same as the theatrical cut, and that which was available on video, despite extra scenes being available including an alternative ending. The audio commentary is amiable enough, if rather self-congratulatory, but rather technical - more anecdotal stuff would have been good.Read more ›
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By J. Rottweiller Swinburne on 7 Jun 2010
Format: DVD
Other reviewers have commented that this is the most faithful adaptation of the original book to have appeared on screen, and I won't argue with that, never having read it.
Certainly the first half of the film lives up to its promise. The recreation of the murky jungle of the Belgian Congo is perfect, making you feel as if you've walked into the pages of a Joseph Conrad novel. The characterisation is wonderful - David Suchet stands out in a small but unforgettable part as a corrupt and louche Belgian tradepost manager-cum-white slaver, and Ian Holm as the trader/explorer who discovers Greystoke is similarly note-perfect. An unforgettable moment is where the explorers chance upon a tribe of pygmies living in the derelict carcass of a dead elephant - one of the most perfect pieces of cinema that I've ever seen.
However, it all goes downhill once the action shifts away from the Congo and to Britain, where Greystoke is taken to claim his inheritance. We have the obligatory love story, with Greystoke rescuing his simpering love-interest from the clutches of a Victorian Music Hall-style villain, intent on the Greystoke inheritance. There are the (would-be) comedic attempts to turn the Apeman into an English country gentleman (kippers and custard, quite literally). Ralph Richarson turns in a good performance as the Lord of the manor from whom the Apeman will ultimately gain his inheritance (a performance not dissimilar to the one he played, as God, in "Time Bandits" and one which, come to think of it, is not dissimilar to almost every other perfromance of his that I've seen). Everyone involved does their damndest to make it work; but once the location is moved from the Congo, all dramatic tension is lost.
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