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Gregory's Girl [VHS] [1981]


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Product details

  • Actors: John Gordon Sinclair, Dee Hepburn, Jake D'Arcy, Clare Grogan, Robert Buchanan
  • Directors: Bill Forsyth
  • Writers: Bill Forsyth
  • Producers: Clive Parsons, Davina Belling
  • Format: Dolby
  • Language: English
  • Classification: 12
  • Studio: Cinema Club
  • VHS Release Date: 1 Oct 1999
  • Run Time: 88 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (56 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00004CJ65
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 199,542 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

Product Description

Bitter-sweet comedy from director Bill Forsyth. Gregory (John Gordon Sinclair) is a gawky adolescent living in a small Scottish town. He is the star of the school football team until the arrival of the gorgeous Dorothy (Dee Hepburn), the only female player, who quickly replaces him. Although demoted to goalie, Gregory soon falls head-over-heels in love with Dorothy, and sets about trying to ask her out.

From Amazon.co.uk

There is something so utterly captivating about this Bill Forsyth film--whether it's the quaintly authentic Scottish accents (they had to be softened for its US release) or the wholly universal story of young love. But what really gives Gregory's Girl its evergreen appeal is the enchanting performance of young Gordon John Sinclair as the eponymous gangly lead. With his shock of red hair, he's all arms and legs--and inexperience. Gregory becomes infatuated with Dorothy (a lovely Dee Hepburn), who proves a heartier and better athlete than he is. Gregory's so clueless, he relies on advice from his wee sister. The story may be familiar, but Forsyth's astute and affectionate rendering gives the film its momentum (the film won best screenplay at the British Academy Awards). If American viewers at first struggle to understand the well-written banter, it is worth the effort because there's charm in nearly every line. It's curious that both Sinclair and Hepburn, seemingly poised on the brink of stardom here, either chose not to take advantage of the possible opportunity or weren't ever offered roles as wonderful as these. (Sinclair had a small role in Forsyth's Local Hero and starred in 1986's The Girl in the Picture and other small films. Hepburn appears to have worked only once post-Gregory, a brief stint in the British series Crossroads.) Forsyth completed a 1998 sequel, with Sinclair and Ever After's Dougray Scott. --N.F. Mendoza

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

39 of 39 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 21 Mar 2002
Format: DVD
Okay, I'm biased. I must have seen this film fifteen times before I was fifteen (and fifteen times since) but I still enjoy every moment. It's a film that can't help but be funny, full of characters who suffer from the same condition. The harder you squeeze this film the more charm oozes out and therein lies its magic. No tag-team of gag writers can write a film like this. They could never muster the innocence and faith wrapped up in these characters and their stories.
It's a film about kids pretending to be grown ups and doing a better job of it than their parents. It's about how the awkwardness and uncertainty of youth never really leaves us. Above all it's about hope: how sometimes not getting what you want is the best thing that can happen. Smart, funny, moving and all made to look so easy. `Bella, Bella!' Five stars just ain't enough.
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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 18 Dec 2001
Format: VHS Tape
Acute understanding of teenagers trying to cope with their own and what they believe are society's expectations of them, usually with hilarious results. Director Bill Forsyth's teens, adults, school and community solidly believable. John Gordon Sinclair's early talent for goofy comedy a joy to watch.
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25 of 26 people found the following review helpful By J. Goddin on 17 Feb 2006
Format: DVD
I saw this as a spotty youth and loved it. I saw it again as a spotty middle aged person and loved it just as much. These kids could act! The script is subtly amusing and well observed.
Highly recommended.
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43 of 46 people found the following review helpful By MarmiteMan on 1 Oct 2002
Format: DVD
Scottish director Bill Forsyth's second film (his first was That Sinking Feeling, a Glasgow Youth Theatre project), and here he tapped into the male adolescent psyche of young love with such astute and affectionate ease, that it has been accorded 'evergreen' status by all who fondly remember it. Every school has its 'Gregory' - the lanky, gangly, all arms and legs pimply youth, whom everyone just knows, often with cringeing embarrassment, will unfailingly say the wrong things, at the wrong time, in the wrong context - whatever the situation. Perhaps that is because we secretly suspect that we are ourselves an inexperienced Gregory ...
Filmed mostly in or around a recently-completed housing estate near Scottish 'new town' Cumbernauld, our Gregory (hero-to-many John Gordon Sinclair), hopeless goalie of the school's hopeless football team, becomes infatuated with attractive tomboyish Dorothy (Dee Hepburn) ... who is clearly way out of his league. Ever been there? Gregory's wee 10-year old sister Maddy advises on dress sense - Gregory has none, constantly opting for unfashionable brown - whilst around him his friends go on being teenage boys. Eg. Andy likes to stand on the bridge and watch the lorries go by below ("Did you know that 11 tonnes of Corn Flakes goes under this bridge every morning?")
The film is stuffed with small quirks and visual vignets: the teachers laughing from the window at Gregory's 'shadow goalkeeping' on the playground below; the Headmaster (Chic Murray) tasting a jam-doughnut whilst pastry-obsessed Steve takes down the orders; the peeping-tom schoolboys mesmerized (Andy almost faints) when a nurse removes her brassière whilst smaller but apparently more worldy boys don't bat an eyelid ("All that fuss over a bit o' tit, eh ...
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Swellms on 6 May 2012
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I saw Gregory's Girl when it was first released in the early 1980's as part of a double-bill with Chariots of Fire. I quite liked it, but it wasn't really what I was expecting. I watched it again recently on the television, and now my view has changed: for me this may well be the best film ever made. Like Local Hero, which has long been on my all time top 5 list, it touches things within me that only a very small number of films, books or pieces of music do.

On the face of it, it's nothing special. A low-budget film about teenagers, by a previously unknown director, set in an unremarkable town in Scotland. A simple story - barely a story at all - which has been done many times before and since. Little in the way of character development or jokes. A soundtrack which ignores the New Wave of British music, then at its height, in favour of free-form jazz-funk.

But somehow, from this unpromising mix, emerges the most wonderful piece of film-making. Much has been written about its subtle, observational humour, and the closer you look, the more achingly funny it becomes. But at the same time I have no problem in admitting that it makes me cry. Not tears of self-pity or sadness, just a reaction to the swell of emotion brought on by the profoundly touching last 20 minutes, as Gregory is steered away from his hopeless obsession with the unattainable Dorothy. In a film packed with glorious scenes and moments, the first time we see Susan in her beret waiting by the phone-box is the one that crowns them all.

It's also a film packed with wonderful lines. Here are just a few of my favourites:

"Ten years old, and with the body of a woman of thirteen."

"The nicest part is just before you taste it. Your mouth goes all tingly.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Kats on 11 Aug 2011
Format: DVD
This is my favourite film of all time, and while it has obvious appeal to those who were teenagers in the early eighties (remember picture skirts, anyone?) it has so much humour and charm it would appeal to anyone. The film starts with Gregory and his mates sharing a pair of binoculars to spy on a nurse undressing. After practically hyperventilating, they go home, satisfied. Two younger boys cooly pass by and comment 'all that fuss over a bit of tit.' The other says, 'oh look, the knickers.' From then on its a riot of memorable quotes and scenes.

Gregory, the hopeless gangly adolescent lead is instantly loveable, and it seems obvious to everyone that his crush on the glamorous football-playing Dorothy is doomed. But there's far more to Gregory's Girl than the central story. There's the person in the penguin suit who keeps getting misdirected around the school. There's Gregory's friends: the one with the talent for cookery of dubious sexuality who has a thriving business in cakes in the boys' toilets, the geeky photographer who has an even more thriving business selling photos of Dorothy. There's Gregory's younger sister, far more knowing and wise than him, who gives him fashion advice. Chic Murray gives a brilliant performance as the headmaster. And the final scene in the country park has to be the most feelgood evocation of summer and youth ever filmed.

I fell in love with this film when I was sixteen and over the years it's lost none of its charm
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