Green Street Hooligans 2005

Amazon Instant Video

(141) IMDb 7.5/10
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Elijah Wood stars as an expelled Harvard student who moves to London and finds himself embraced and disturbed by the dominant violence of English soccer culture.

Starring:
Elijah Wood, Claire Forlani
Runtime:
1 hour 44 minutes

Green Street Hooligans

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Product Details

Genres Drama, Sport
Director Lexi Alexander
Starring Elijah Wood, Claire Forlani
Supporting actors Charlie Hunnam, David Alexander, Oliver Allison, James Allison, Geoff Bell, Joel Beckett
Studio Universal Pictures
BBFC rating Suitable for 18 years and over
Rental rights 48 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By wizard on 18 Mar 2012
Format: DVD
I think a lot of people are missing the point with this film. For me, it was not so much about football violence as about the morals behind it. The main character, Elijah Wood, does not join the Green Street Elite because he enjoys the hooliganism - he joins because he finds a loyalty with them that he never found back home in America (as is highlighted by the opening scene). The fact that the film also makes you care about people you would normally despise (or should despise) shows how effecive it is at portraying the tragedy of such addiction to violence.

Yes, you can find faults with the film - the GSE leader's cockney accent is very dodgy, some scenes verge on the unbelievable. But as for the leader's walk - take a look around and you'll see that it's the way a lot of people walk when they are trying to look like more than they actually are. And Elijah Wood is not miscast - the fact that he does not look like a football hooligan is exactly the point.

The violence in this film is indeed quite graphic, but that doesn't make it glorified - rather it shows how destructive it can be, not just to the individual but to their families too.

The ending - unlike so many films - provides a satisfying conclusion that sums up the entire film. As Elijah says, it's not about brutal, meaningless violence but about learning 'when to stand up for yourself, and when to walk away.' The point of all the brutality in the film becomes clear as Elijah explains what he learnt from the Green Street Elite's excessive use of violence: that there is an alternative, which can be just as effective.

If you really do want a film about football hooliganism, then this may not be for you - try Football Factory. But as a film in itself, this is great.
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26 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Mr. G. Horsewood on 9 Nov 2006
Format: DVD
I think a lot of people are missing the point with this film. For me, it was not so much about football violence as about the morals behind it. The main character, Elijah Wood, does not join the Green Street Elite because he enjoys the hooliganism - he joins because he finds a loyalty with them that he never found back home in America (as is highlighted by the opening scene). The fact that the film also makes you care about people you would normally despise (or should despise) shows how effecive it is at portraying the tragedy of such addiction to violence.

Yes, you can find faults with the film - the GSE leader's cockney accent is very dodgy, some scenes verge on the unbelievable. But as for the leader's walk - take a look around and you'll see that it's the way a lot of people walk when they are trying to look like more than they actually are. And Elijah Wood is not miscast - the fact that he does not look like a football hooligan is exactly the point.

The violence in this film is indeed quite graphic, but that doesn't make it glorified - rather it shows how destructive it can be, not just to the individual but to their families too.

The ending - unlike so many films - provides a satisfying conclusion that sums up the entire film. As Elijah says, it's not about brutal, meaningless violence but about learning 'when to stand up for yourself, and when to walk away.' The point of all the brutality in the film becomes clear as Elijah explains what he learnt from the Green Street Elite's excessive use of violence: that there is an alternative, which can be just as effective.

If you really do want a film about football hooliganism, then this may not be for you - try Football Factory. But as a film in itself, this is great.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By P. Frizelle on 23 Feb 2010
Format: DVD
Expelled from Harvard, journalism student Matt (Wood) heads to London to stay with his married sister Shannon (Claire Forlani). As he plans his next move he falls in with her charismatic brother-in-law Pete (Hunnam), a well-respected teacher and dedicated Hammers fan who proudly leads his club's infamous Green Street Elite or GSE, a team of West Ham supporting hooligans who enjoy nothing more than a few pints and a vicious fight with opposing fans. Soon enough Matt is embroiled in their world and kicking heads in with the best of them, both on the streets of London and around the country. Reputation is everything, as Pete strives for the GSE to be the most feared and infamous firm in England. Matt soon becomes addicted to the adrenaline-fuelled intensity of a post-match scrap and the boozy camaraderie of his new circle of friends. But Pete's right-hand man Bovver (Leo Gregory) doesn't take kindly to this Yank interloper and secretly plots his downfall.
Their hatred of journalists forces Matt to conceal his background, but for how long? As events builds towards a showdown with their most hated foes, the Millwall firm, family loyalties and personal vendettas threaten to spiral out of control and end in tragedy. Director Lexi Alexander punctuates her film with extended fight sequences that boast a bruising, muscular authenticity. Sadly, nothing else rings true in an often comical drama that, like Nick Love's The Football Factory before it, obscenely glamorises senseless violence. There's a great movie about hooliganism and its place in working-class male culture. It's called The Firm, and Alan Clarke made it in 1988.
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