Green Street Hooligans 2005

Amazon Instant Video

(156) IMDb 7.5/10
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Elijah Wood stars as an expelled Harvard student who moves to London and finds himself embraced and disturbed by the dominant violence of English soccer culture.

Starring:
Elijah Wood,Claire Forlani
Runtime:
1 hour, 44 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

Green Street Hooligans

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Product Details

Genres Drama, Sport
Director Lexi Alexander
Starring Elijah Wood, Claire Forlani
Supporting actors Charlie Hunnam, David Alexander, Oliver Allison, James Allison, Geoff Bell, Joel Beckett
Studio Universal Pictures
BBFC rating Suitable for 18 years and over
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

3.4 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By wizard on 18 Mar. 2012
Format: DVD
I think a lot of people are missing the point with this film. For me, it was not so much about football violence as about the morals behind it. The main character, Elijah Wood, does not join the Green Street Elite because he enjoys the hooliganism - he joins because he finds a loyalty with them that he never found back home in America (as is highlighted by the opening scene). The fact that the film also makes you care about people you would normally despise (or should despise) shows how effecive it is at portraying the tragedy of such addiction to violence.

Yes, you can find faults with the film - the GSE leader's cockney accent is very dodgy, some scenes verge on the unbelievable. But as for the leader's walk - take a look around and you'll see that it's the way a lot of people walk when they are trying to look like more than they actually are. And Elijah Wood is not miscast - the fact that he does not look like a football hooligan is exactly the point.

The violence in this film is indeed quite graphic, but that doesn't make it glorified - rather it shows how destructive it can be, not just to the individual but to their families too.

The ending - unlike so many films - provides a satisfying conclusion that sums up the entire film. As Elijah says, it's not about brutal, meaningless violence but about learning 'when to stand up for yourself, and when to walk away.' The point of all the brutality in the film becomes clear as Elijah explains what he learnt from the Green Street Elite's excessive use of violence: that there is an alternative, which can be just as effective.

If you really do want a film about football hooliganism, then this may not be for you - try Football Factory. But as a film in itself, this is great.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Delvis Memphistopheles TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 1 Mar. 2010
Format: DVD
The plot? More holes than the sinking of the Belgrano.

Worked with Millwall hard men for over 15 years, albeit when the football violence stopped and the drugs/alcohol took over. The ability to resort to violence was never delayed by "rules". The American angle is another add on, obviously to try and give it a wider audience and explain English soccer culture to the folk of Winsconsin.

There are elements which raise it above the silly. The relationhip between Bovver and the leader of the gang has a certain undertow of tension, loyalty and belonging. Although the accent slips and slides, the relationship twists with a loss of status, needing to keep up the front with more masculine shows, strikes a chord with the violent men of Bermondsey, Rotherhite, Deptford and West Ham, Poplar, Barking and Stepney I have known over the years.

Old Kent Rd, away from the football, was marked with constant gang fights between white hard men arranging rows. White trainers show the blood, but Reeboks have been a de rigeur white working class foot item for the past twenty years. At least they weren't wearing Dr. Martins.

There are pubs like the one depicted in the film. People do stand on tables, throw beer and sing "battle" songs. Its called the "George" and its in Bermondsey. Not places for the feint of heart. There are a number of whitexploitation films and this is part of the genre. It tries to depict white working class life.

It's not based on reality. Show me a film that is; Die Hard, Shining, Apocalypse Now, Saw I-V? There is a need to package white working class life as something from what it is; Eastenders, Coronation Street, Shameless. They all have the same centre of disbelief as Green Street.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By DanielJohnson on 19 Mar. 2012
Format: DVD
When I started watching this, I never thought that I'd find myself feeling any sympathy for the hooligans portrayed whatsoever; they all appeared violent and disgusting, and it was simply that. But, astonishingly, the film is competent in it's presentation of their actions more as an addiction, and through it's gritty, brutal fights, never glamourises the horrific nature of the violence. It does stretch it slightly when it asks us to feel sympathy for one particular character, as the film dives headfirst into cliches of redemption in it's final act, but it never ignores the cosequences of hooliganism, nor the accountability of it's characters. Yes, Elijah Wood is entirely unconvincing, even raising a few unintentional laughs as he giggles somewhat pathetically amongst a group of burly men - less his fault than whoever chose to cast him in the role - so the standout performance here is that of Charlie Hunnam; ignore the poor English accent, and his character is both likable and surprisingly complex. In short, it's worth a watch - even if you loathe football like myself - as a competent drama/thriller, let down only by it's third act reliance on cliches, and a distracting lead performance.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By b on 18 Aug. 2008
Format: DVD
Innocently expelled from Harvard, Matt moves to stay with his sister in London where his brother-in-law decides that his uselessness as a fighter means that he can be taken to the match. Matt is quickly initiated into a world of beer, swearing and violence and is seduced by the camararderie of the West Ham fans and the rush of the violent fights at the end of the match.
The film cheerfully explores every stereotype of the football hooligan, portraying a macho culutre where standing by your mates is all that matters. The film's plot is predictible and too many characters are one-dimensional and charmless. This means that the slower sections of the film lack interest whilst the use of dull grey and black shades mean that this film is visually bleak.
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