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Greatest Storm Hardcover – 8 Nov 2002


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: The History Press; 1st Edition edition (8 Nov. 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0750928042
  • ISBN-13: 978-0750928045
  • Product Dimensions: 14.5 x 2.6 x 22.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 780,996 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

About the Author

Martin Brayne is a retired geography teacher and a fellow of the Royal Geographic Society. He is editor of the quarterly journal of the Parson Woodforde Society, concerned with the life and times of the eighteenth-century diarist and has published a number of articles in professional journals. This is his first book. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Peter Jameson on 16 Mar. 2003
Format: Hardcover
Most of us in the South of England remember vividly the storm of the Autumn of 1887. We thought of it as a specially disasterous event. This book shews that it was mild compared with the Storm of 1703.
Martin Brayne's book describes vividly the destruction and chaos caused. It covers so many fields of interest - the enormous damage to buildings, the loss of life, the wreck of shipping and particularly the destruction of the Eddystone lighthouse.
Martin Brayne is able to draw on eye-witness accounts since Daniel Defoe advertised for them in the aftermath and published them at the time.
Compared with our 1987 hurricane when accounts centered on the destrution of trees, in 1703 it was houses and churches and the loss of a large part of the Navy in a time of war.
Details stand out. At Fairford the great West window bulged inward and crashed into the nave. A chimney of the bishop's palace in Wells was toppled through the roof above the bishop's bedroom killing both him and his wife. The lead on countless church roofs was rolled up as if it were paper and dumped at great distances. People could not know whether it was safer to stay indoors and risk the house falling on them or to go into the street where the air was full of flying tiles. Ships were so driven by the wind that captains hod not only to lower all sails but also to order that the masts be cut off at the deck. In the aftermath at low tide sailors of wrecked vessels were wandering up and down on the Goodwin Sands knowing that when the tide came in they were certain to be drowned and the people of Deal were accused of being more interested in plunderinmg the wrecked ships than in rescuing the sailors.
The whole is set against the religious and political fears of the time.
It is a highly readable and truly fascinating story of a happening that made a huge impact in its day but has now been largely forgotten.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Michael on 7 Jun. 2010
Format: Paperback
This is an excellent book about a catastrophic storm in 1703, which killed vast mumbers of people in the South of England and the Channel.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By sirius on 19 Sept. 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Good historical read - well researched. I wonder how bad things would have been if the Met Office was around then. Mind you they can get it wrong too can't they. I think weather prediction is not as exact a science as we would wish. Would the impact be as bad or do we just hope we have everything in place to reduce the risk and consequences. I don't think so.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By gladys setterfield on 3 May 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
i have just started to read this book, it will no doubt take me a long time, this is the third attempt i have had at getting it as two went missing in the post so i was very pleased at last to get this one
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 1 review
fascinating 16 Mar. 2015
By Juliann deLayne - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I would have liked to have seen more of the potential causes of such a rogue storm drawing from more modern storms, but otherwise quite thorough.
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