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A Great Place for a Seizure
 
 

A Great Place for a Seizure [Kindle Edition]

Terry Tracy
4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)

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Product Description

Product Description

Mischa Dunn's family flees Chile in the wake of the 1973 coup d'etat that installs a military dictatorship. She settles comfortably in her newly adopted country, the United States, until one day, an unexplained seizure in a library signals the beginning of her life with epilepsy.  With an engaging balance of humor, insight, and sensitivity Mischa draws the reader into a vivid tale that travels across three continents over thirty years. "A Great Place for a Seizure" is not the only, but it is the first of its kind to be identified as a novelory.

NOVELORY  [no . vel . O . ry ]  noun  (1) A fusion of the terms "novel"and "short story" to describe a series of linked stories that may stand by themselves as individual tales and/or come together as a novel, when read in sequence.  (2) A term, coined by Terry Tracy, to identify a species of literature that reflects the 21st century IT-induced mind-set of tight schedules, rapid communication, and the desire to have all things at once.  (3)  a gimmick. 


The author, Terry Tracy, has worked as a human rights activist, journalist and diplomat. She has epilepsy and in 2007 wrote the charter for an association of disabled employees of the U.S. State Department. Currently, she resides in London with her family.

About the Author

Terry Tracy has worked as a human rights activist, journalist, and diplomat. She has epilepsy and in 2007 wrote the charter for an association of disabled employees at the U.S. State Department. She currently resides in London with her family.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 538 KB
  • Print Length: 292 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1453834702
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: Createspace; 2 edition (6 May 2011)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B004ZS96ZS
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #389,029 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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More About the Author

Terry Tracy, has worked as a human rights activist, journalist, and U.S. diplomat. She has had epilepsy for over twenty-five years and in 2007 she wrote the charter for an association of disabled employees at the U.S. State Department.

Terry Tracy was born in Virginia, but moved around Latin America in her childhood as an army brat. After college she worked as a receptionist, then left to work for free in Honduras at an orphanage. Terry returned to work in a human rights organization in Washington DC, then left for Guatemala to work as a free-lance journalist. By this time, her addiction to wanderlust was evident. In denial, she crossed the Atlantic to Cambridge, England and earned a Master's degree in an obscure, but nevertheless intriguing, subject-matter: 16th century Spanish colonial judicial systems. When she returned to the United States she joined the establishment. In 2007 she left the US State Department to take turns as a stay-at-home parent. Terry is Asian-Irish American and currently resides in London with her German husband and their Asian-Irish-German-American daughter.

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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
4.3 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Format:Kindle Edition
I would first like to thank Terry Tracy for contacting me to review her novel and for having the patience while I get through the many books I have to read.
Now onto the novel itself!

I have to admit that my usual genre's (although I don't do it on purpose) tend to fall into the YA, Fantasy, Paranormal and romance departments but since I will literally review any genre I was more than happy to give this book a go. I was drawn in by the subject topic itself and, having briefly touched on epilepsy when studying my psychology degree, I was intrigued to learn a bit more. This is much more than just your standard novel. This is a story of life, love, loss, family and identity. The biggest question of all? Does epilepsy define the person or does the person define themselves? And that is the question that Mischa Dunn, the main character in this book, is faced with on a daily basis:

"Mischa Dunn's family flees Chile in the aftermath of the 1973 coup d'etat that installs a military dictatorship. After settling into life in the United States, at the age of fourteen, Mischa begins to have unexplained seizures. Diagnosed with epilepsy, she faces an uncertain life. With an engaging balance of humor, insight, and sensitivity Mischa's story takes the reader across three continents, over thirty years." (Synopsis taken from amazon.co.uk)

I really really loved this book! Mischa's voice was loud and clear in this story and I have amazing admiration for her (and anyone else who has to live with epilepsy) and how she lives her life despite the obstacles she encounters. What I admired the most on a character basis was Misha's ability to live. I know that sounds really weird but she's so strong throughout the novel right until the end and I found that truly inspiring.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Format:Kindle Edition
A Great Place for a Seizure is a must read for anyone interested in what it means to live in the world with epilepsy. Terry Tracy has created a believable character in Mischa whose determination to be independent and to make her own rules is both admirable and frustrating. As readers we recognise her need to challenge the discourses and practices that position Mischa as disabled, vulnerable and dependent but we also sympathise for those around her who are trying to understand something they have never experienced. Mischa's life with epilepsy is clearly different but it is not a lesser one. Tracy avoids the mawkish narrative of 'overcoming disability to achieve' and instead she evidences Mischa as simply getting on with the practice of living. Terry uses the structure of the novelory, in part, to convey the episodic nature of the seizures and this can take a little getting used to as a reader. However the richness of insight and the gateway into the experience of epilepsy make this an essential text for those living with, or around, epilepsy and especially for those providing professional services to people with epilepsy.

Dr. Nick Hodge, Principal Lecturer in Research Development, Department of Education, Childhood and Inclusion at Sheffield Hallam University.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Authentic and full-bodied 1 Aug 2011
By Tania
Format:Kindle Edition
It has been a real pleasure to read this book. Years ago when I studied Anglo-American literature I used to immerse myself in the richness of multi-layer complexity of McEwan's characters. What made them convincing and real to me was their weird authenticity and the easiness with which they entered my world as real human beings. Mischa Dunn has done the same thing. She appeared `out of nowhere' with a full-bodied weird authenticity underpinning the `documentary' style of the novel `A Great Place for a Seizure'.

Yes, the book is about a character who has epilepsy, but it is also a book about a mother-daughter relationship, about love, about friendship, about parenthood, about expatriates, about medical doctors, etc. The book is open to various ways of reading and interpretations and it has many layers. For me it is about the story of Mischa Dunn which does not resemble a `story' at all and does not follow any known `plot'; it smells, sounds and feels as real life.

The author chooses to live Mischa's life through scores of seizures, a multitude of locations, plentiful of characters and that choice made the book genuinely an experiential journey rather than just a well narrated and neatly presented piece of writing. Locations, events, people, humour appear and disappear in the novel just like they do in real life. Many narrative `loops' get opened and closed (e.g. conversations with Ella in the coffee shop and a letter to Isabel/Ella at the end of the book) and many stay open (e.g. Clarissa and Christopher), just like in real life.

Some parts are very personal and intense (e.g. Mischa's relationship with Hector or her relationship with epilepsy) and some very routine-like (e.g. work in Washington, DC), just like in real life.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great read - Avoids the clichés 23 Oct 2011
Format:Kindle Edition
You would be forgiven for wondering if this was yet another addition to the burgeoning genre of the misery memoire. However this is no sentimental biography - not a plea for sympathy for the `afflicted'. It is indeed a novel and its central character - Mischa - is a feisty one. A person, who when she experiences the disabling scrutinizing gaze of others - a gaze that might turn her life into a `case' - is well capable of returning it -often to entertaining effect.

Mark Haydon-Laurelut
Systemic Psychotherapist & Lecturer, Department of Psychology, University of Portsmouth
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