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Then Will The Great Ocean Wash Deep Above (Apollo Quartet Book 3)
 
 

Then Will The Great Ocean Wash Deep Above (Apollo Quartet Book 3) [Kindle Edition]

Ian Sales
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)

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Product Description

Product Description

It is April 1962. The Korean War has escalated and the US is struggling to keep the Russians and Chinese north of the 38th parallel. All the men are away fighting, but that doesn’t mean the Space Race is lost. NASA decides to look elsewhere for its astronauts: the thirteen women pilots who passed the same tests as the original male candidates. These are the Mercury 13: Jerrie Cobb, Janey Hart, Myrtle Cagle, Jerri Sloan, Jan Dietrich, Marion Dietrich, Bernice Steadman, Wally Funk, Sarah Gorelick, Gene Nora Stumbough, Jean Hixson, Rhea Hurrle and Irene Leverton. One of these women will be the first American in space. Another will be the first American to spacewalk. Perhaps one will even be the first human being to walk on the Moon.

Beneath the surface of the Atlantic Ocean, deep in the Puerto Rico Trench north of San Juan, lies a film bucket from a KH-4 Corona spy satellite. It should have been caught in mid-air by a C-130 from the 6549th Test Group. That didn’t happen. So the US Navy bathyscaphe Trieste II must descend twenty thousand feet to retrieve the bucket, down where light has never reached and the pressure is four tons per square inch. But there is more in the depths than anyone had expected, much more.

This is not our world. But it very nearly was.

About the Author

Ian Sales is a writer, reviewer and the curator of SF Mistressworks. He has been published in a number of magazines and original anthologies. He won the 2012 British Science Fiction Association Award for his hard sf novella Adrift on the Sea of Rains, the first book of the Apollo Quartet. It was also a finalist for the 2012 Sidewise Award. The second book of the quartet, The Eye With Which The Universe Beholds Itself, was published in January 2013, and the third, Then Will The Great Ocean Wash Deep Above, was published in November 2013. He can be found at iansales.com

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 610 KB
  • Print Length: 72 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: Whippleshield Books (23 Nov 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00GW1TGBK
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #202,177 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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More About the Author

Ian Sales was only three when Neil Armstrong landed on the Moon, but he didn't see it on television because he grew up in the Middle East. He lived in Qatar, Oman, Dubai and Abu Dhabi, before returning to the UK for schooling, spending only the holidays abroad. After graduating from university, he returned to Abu Dhabi to work - first for the Higher Colleges of Technology, and then for a national oil company. He came back to the UK in 2002 and settled in Yorkshire, where he now works as a database administrator for an ISP.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Gripping and fascinating in equal measure 8 Dec 2013
Format:Paperback
Ian Sales is a fascinating man. He reads a LOT and it shows. His blog posts on science fiction are well worth reading. Perhaps more importantly he helps show that there is a fantastic array of amazing books that are hiding away from the supermarket shelves and waiting for us to read. Sales as a reader is always keen to explore new writers and more importantly he is an advocate for people actually getting the chance to read some of the great female science fiction authors. So much so that as a reaction to SF Masterworks he created a blog called SF Mistressworks. It is well worth a look. This may sound like an aside but it does give you some background about why the author took this story in the direction he did. I say the story. What I really mean is one of the stories. There are two stories intertwined. One story plumbs the depths whilst the other is flying high. Both are about explorations and are weaved together in a way that is surprisingly gripping.

This book is written in such a way that it feels like you are watching a documentary on the History channel. I had to remind myself at several points that it wasn't historical fact. Everything written is feasible. More than that though there was a palpable sense of tension. If had that feel of watching a real life drama being played back after the fact.

After the story has finished this book talks you through what actually happened and how easily things really could have been as portrayed in this book. The final section contains references and links to allow the reader to go and find out more. I for one found myself clicking through several of the links to find out more.

Sales really nails it with this book. I think it is his best work yet. You should go and buy it now.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars And now for something a little different 2 Jan 2014
By D. Harris TOP 500 REVIEWER VINE VOICE
Format:Paperback
A little different, if you haven't read either of the previous volumes in Sales' quartet, because his mix of alternate history, technological possibility and human endeavour IS refreshingly new; but also if you have, because here he focusses more on the human (and on real people).

The book is divided into six threads, named after the six quarks: up/ down, strange/ charm and top/ bottom.

"Up" and "Down" deal with two slightly different (I think) alternate realities - an Earth where the Korean war went on and on, so that the US had no men to spare as astronauts for the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo missions, sending women into space instead, and another where a deep sea expedition is mounted to recover film from a spy satellite. In both, unlike in Sales' earlier books Adrift on the Sea of Rains and The Eye With Which The Universe Beholds Itself the technology is very much as it really was, with the deviation being the history - especially the 1960s-female-astronaut thread "Up" (of course the deep-sea adventure is "down"). We see this through the eyes of Geraldyne Cobb, a real person, as were her 12 colleagues - who actually trained for missions that, in the Mad men era of the 60s, never came. But what if, what if things had only been slightly different? Then we see the possibilities - we see Cobb and the others having by no means an easy time, still the victims of sexist thinking and attitudes, but actually making it into orbit. It's a wonderfully imagined piece and I only wished that Sales had explored it in a more leisurely way - perhaps in a full length novel.
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Format:Kindle Edition
Ian Sales' Apollo Quartet is an award-winning sequence of alternate history novellas which explore different aspects of the twentieth-century space race.

I have a lot of time for what Sales is doing here with the Apollo quartet project. Each novella is published separately in ebook, paperback or handsome and affordable hardcover (which I recommend!) and I hope that once the sequence is complete a mass-market publisher buys up the rights to publish the complete collection. Its an interesting achievement: the goal of each appears to be to try write with the style and depth of 'literary' fiction but with a careful focus on the details of the hard SF subject matter. Sales' research appears comprehensive and nuanced.

The previous two stories were both superb, but also, for me, ever-so-slightly lacking. The first, a tale of a military moon base after the end of the world, seemed to rely on an unexplained macguffin that also pops up in another of Sales' stories (but not one of the Quartet). The second was my favourite: a superb exploration of the astronaut mindset and the reality of relativity on space exploration. My minor quibble here was that important story details are hidden away in a rather dry timeline of this alternate history, and the vital final scene of the story is positioned after the timeline (the details in the timeline do bridge the two parts of the narrative, I just wish it was more elegantly done). Now I'm all for a good paratextual game, and I love appendices, footnotes and found documents as much as the next bibliophile, but there was no real need, and it detracted from a superb story, rather than enhanced it.
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Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars  4 reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Latest effort from award-winning British science fiction author 5 Dec 2013
By Cliff Burns - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
In a relatively short period of time, British author Ian Sales has distinguished himself as a writer of lucid, sharply honed prose and, in the process, gained the respect of his peers, while drawing more and more readers to his original, literate efforts.

THEN WILL THE GREAT OCEAN... is the third volume of the "Apollo Quartet", an admirable, spare tale presenting an alternative history that displays, once again, the author's erudition and skill at melding reality and might-have-beens. Sales has the enviable ability to imagine vivid, believable backdrops, creating a sense of place and verisimilitude that quickly engages readers...and enthralls them. Never has space seemed so REAL.

"The Apollo Quartet" is excellent speculative fiction but will also be of interest to space buffs, geeks and anyone else who appreciates quality prose (regardless of genre). A writer who fully deserves to be mentioned in the same breath as Ken MacLeod or Alastair Reynolds--Ian Sales, welcome to the Big League.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent addition to the "Apollo Quartet" series 28 Dec 2013
By Douglas F. Hayes - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
This is the best of the Apollo Quartet tales so far. Again, it is set in an alternate version of the 1960s in which the Russians are beating the Americans in the space race at every turn. Worse, the Korean War has America bogged down worse than Vietnam and is actually a covert battle with Russia and China as well as the North Koreans (kinda like the real thing...). With all the top male pilots recalled to active duty, NASA, reluctantly, picks 13 women pilots to carry out the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo space flights. Despite the sexism of the times, they have the "right stuff" to get the job done. Years later, with the Korean War winding down, an all out effort to recover a spy satellite's film canister requires a spooky mission to the deepest part of the Atlantic Ocean and may be the setup for events depicted in "Adrift on the Sea of Rains", the first of the Apollo Quartet stories. Oh, one more thing: the all female "Mercury 13" astronauts really existed. Sales includes a heartbreaking history of what happened to them.

Having grown up during the space race, I love Sales' attention to detail and all the NASA jargon. He has done his homework. His writing is spare and effortless. I'm looking forward to the next story.
5.0 out of 5 stars A great little find 24 Mar 2014
By Michael J. Martineck - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition
The third book in Ian Sales’ Apollo Quartet, Then Will The Great Ocean Wash Deep Above, is a treasure. Like a sunken chest you’d love to discover snorkeling in St. Croix. It is compact and contained, feels like it comes from a different time and packed it’s full of precious little gems and nuggets that aren’t for spending. They are for keeping. “Wash” is a work of hard science fiction – alternative history – love letter to the space age - making this book about as rare as pirate booty. And just about as valuable.

As with the other two volumes in the quartet, “Wash” is meticulously researched. Ian puts together the pieces so nicely that it feels very much like our real history, rather than one that diverges during the Korean War. The coda in the book remarks on the true story of the characters you’ve just read about and rather than serving as a footnote, the end cap acts to make the whole work – fact and fiction – that much more poignant. Positioning the real and imagined together serves to illuminate the time and people and culture that helped spur mankind’s last great stage of exploration, above and below.

Human failures amidst humanities greatest achievements – we need to look at history from different angles, which is what this book (and it’s siblings) does so, so well. We can learn from it and leaning – at the risk of sounding like an afterschool special – is one of our greatest treasures.

I am very much looking forward to the final book of the set.
5.0 out of 5 stars And now for something a little different 12 Jan 2014
By D. Harris - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
A little different, if you haven't read either of the previous volumes in Sales' quartet, because his mix of alternate history, technological possibility and human endeavour IS refreshingly new; but also if you have, because here he focusses more on the human (and on real people).

The book is divided into six threads, named after the six quarks: up/ down, strange/ charm and top/ bottom.

"Up" and "Down" deal with two slightly different (I think) alternate realities - an Earth where the Korean war went on and on, so that the US had no men to spare as astronauts for the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo missions, sending women into space instead, and another where a deep sea expedition is mounted to recover film from a spy satellite. In both, unlike in Sales' earlier books Adrift on the Sea of Rains and The Eye With Which The Universe Beholds Itself the technology is very much as it really was, with the deviation being the history - especially the 1960s-female-astronaut thread "Up" (of course the deep-sea adventure is "down"). We see this through the eyes of Geraldyne Cobb, a real person, as were her 12 colleagues - who actually trained for missions that, in the Mad men era of the 60s, never came. But what if, what if things had only been slightly different? Then we see the possibilities - we see Cobb and the others having by no means an easy time, still the victims of sexist thinking and attitudes, but actually making it into orbit. It's a wonderfully imagined piece and I only wished that Sales had explored it in a more leisurely way - perhaps in a full length novel. In comparison, "Down" doesn't enthral quite so much, though it, also, perhaps has hooks to a potential wider story as Lt Cmdr McIntyre encounters the unexpected deep below the Bermuda Triangle...

The central two parts of the book - "Strange" and "Charm" - are shorter and in some ways Codas to the stories in "Up" and "Down". Sales doesn't wrap things up neatly but shows us where his stories are heading (this is similar to the treatment in the first two books of the Quartet.)

The final section - consisting of "Top" and "Bottom" - gives factual background to the earlier parts. This is something that sales' earlier books, which were heavier on technical jargon and acronyms, dealt with through appendices and lists of terms. Gives the more human focus of this book, it seems more appropriate that this is done in a more narrative way.

I enjoyed this part of the Quartet. It is a short book, and doesn't pretend to be anything else - but felt complete to me. Like a precious length of film retrieved from the deeps, you can see a series of pictures, but you can only speculate what was on the bits that never made it to the surface. Perhaps one day Sales will retrieve some more. I hope he does. In the meantime, we have these slightly disturbing Cold War dreams to show what might have been.
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