Great North Road and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
£16.00
  • RRP: £20.00
  • You Save: £4.00 (20%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Great North Road Hardcover – 27 Sep 2012


See all 15 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£16.00
£3.99 £0.01

Frequently Bought Together

Great North Road + Manhattan in Reverse
Price For Both: £21.99

Buy the selected items together


Product details

  • Hardcover: 1104 pages
  • Publisher: Macmillan (27 Sep 2012)
  • Language: Unknown
  • ISBN-10: 0230750052
  • ISBN-13: 978-0230750050
  • Product Dimensions: 16 x 6.6 x 24 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (350 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 100,078 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Peter F. Hamilton was born in Rutland in 1960, and still lives near Rutland Water with his family. He began writing in 1987, and sold his first short story to Fear magazine in 1988. He has also been published in Interzone and the In Dreams and New Worlds anthologies, and several small-press publications. His work includes the Greg Mandel series, the Night's Dawn trilogy - which established him as Britain's bestselling writer of science fiction - and his critically acclaimed Void novels: The Dreaming Void, The Temporal Void and The Evolutionary Void. His novels and his handbook (a vital guide to the Night's Dawn trilogy) have sold almost two million copies worldwide.

Product Description

Review

Praise for Peter F. Hamilton's "The Evolutionary Void" "Satisfying and powerful . . . Space Opera doesn't get much more epic."--SFFWorld "Spiced with plenty of action and intrigue."--"San Jose Mercury News" "The Temporal Void" "Fusing elements of hard SF with adventure fantasy tropes, Hamilton has singlehandedly raised the bar for grand-scale speculative storytelling."--"Publishers Weekly"" " "A great, sprawling, ripping yarn reminiscent of Golden Age Science Fiction."--SFCrowsnest "The Dreaming Void" "A real spellbinder from a master storyteller . . . dozens of scenarios, a surprisingly well-delineated cast of thousands, plotting enough to delight the most Machiavellian of readers."--"Kirkus Reviews "(starred review) "Peter F. Hamilton [is the] owner of the most powerful imagination in science fiction, author of immense, complex far-future sagas."--Ken Follett, author of "World Without End" --This text refers to an alternate Hardcover edition.

About the Author

Peter F. Hamilton was born in Rutland in 1960 and still lives nearby. He began writing in 1987, and sold his first short story to Fear magazine in 1988. He has written many bestselling novels, including the Greg Mandel series, the Night’s Dawn trilogy, the Commonwealth Saga, the Void trilogy, two short story collections and several standalone novels.

Find out more about Peter F. Hamilton at www.peterfhamilton.co.uk , or discover more Pan Macmillan and Tor UK books at

www.torbooks.co.uk


Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Related Media


Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

44 of 48 people found the following review helpful By Me on 6 Oct 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
If "Game of Thrones" can be turned into a TV series then I think Peter Hamilton's latest novel should be turned into a show too. The Great Road North is an excellent story: imaginative, clever, and well paced; it blends sci-fi with crime, horror, doomed romance, and a bit of political/action thriller. I had been looking forward to this book since reading the plot summary several months ago and I was not disappointed. To me, a long-time fan, it seemed like he had gone through all his previous novels, cherry picked the best elements and weaved them all together.

Talking of weaving, one of the most enjoyable and challenging things about Hamilton is tying his story threads back together using the limited (but very deliberate) clues he writes in before the plot is revealed. I got a fair few, but some of them eluded me until about page 930... It's always fun trying to guess, but I don't think I'll ever be able to call him predictable.

Another thing I really enjoyed was the way he wrote against a believable background, speculating on where modern science and technology might take us and describing how people will live in the near future; think Michio Kaku but with verve, humour, and a lot of very British style. Of course with sci-fi it has to go a little bit further and we have seemingly implacable aliens, spaceships and strange planets. However, unlike the Void trilogy, it doesn't stray into fantasy; believability makes this story more accessible.

Of course Hamilton already has a great reputation for his story-telling skills, but I think that with Great North Road he has improved his writing style. Recent novels have had a large cast of characters, which often led to uneven coverage.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By christopher smith on 13 April 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
I have never written a review before so i apologise now but I hope it helps, beware there may be a spoiler .I had high hopes for this book but it didn't quite live up to my expectations, yes it was skilfully written but I felt I was reading two different books, as others have said in their reviews the Newcastle police investigation plot line got somewhat boring and I live in the Newcastle area, this at least kept my interest as I know of the places and names described, the use of the term "pet" is common place, as is the word "aye" for yes, in my humble opinion this part of the book could of been a lot shorter and would not of effected the quality of the overall story telling, the Angela part of this book is a different kettle of fish altogether, this is venturing in to the kind of space opera Peter.f Hamilton exceeds at but again there is not enough of it, the sub-plot aliens in the book the zanth are intriguing but are never really touched upon, the main alien in the story appears to be some highly developed Freddy Kruger eco-worrior and if I'm honest, I got bored with it half way through the book but in fairness it did rekindle my interest near the end of the book, this is a who done it sci-do that's a little slow..all in all a decent read but be prepared to slog through the dull to find the good
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Philip A. Bird on 3 Oct 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I really liked the sound of this book, the story caught my attention. The first 200 pages are hard work and I nearly gave up, essentially it feels like the author takes a while to get into his stride. Also the naming of every vehicle and technology is pretty tedious and not necessary. All that being said the book delivers a very reasonable read. The story flows and the plot is good. I wish the editor had been more brutal in the beginning, would have made this a much better book. It's not a classic and doesn't deliver as much as Alastair Reynolds does, but it is probably worth the space on your bookshelf.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Youngs on 16 Jun 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a fairly classic hunt-the-monster story with some nice variations. As usual Hamilton's writing quality is excellent, however it suffers from considerable bloat (do we really need the back story of a host of minor bit-parts) and would have been much better at 500 rather than 1000 pages. The ending is a bit too neat - if the "villain" had been as rational in the earlier part of the book as they become at the end then much of the storyline would never have happened. Overall a reasonable time filler but with no potential for re-reading.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover
Some years ago I tried to read Hamilton's Reality Dysfunction, I couldn't get into it and put it aside after 200 pages or so.

Didn't really look at his stuff after that but saw TGNR on kindle for 4 pence so decided to give it a whirl. At that price it didn't really matter if it was a turgid as RD.

This book is more than 1,000 pages of aliens v clones v Geordies so the plot scores highly for originality. He does plagiarise himself though with ideas like -let's drive to Sirius (via a hyper spatial tube). I've started to read his Pandoras Star which includes - lets get the train to Alpha Centauri (via a hyper spatial tube). Rejuvenation also features strongly in both books.

Also unimaginative. One of the big technical "advances" is 3d printing. Don't we have this in now?

There are two main threads to the tale a murder hunt in Newcastle and an off world hunt for an alien monster. Of the two the detective narrative is better. The alien hunt drags somewhat.

Long ago the late great Isaac Asimov wrote that you could write detective stories set in the future provided the author played fair with the audience. I don't think Hamilton's plot device of a hideous Alien which can at any time appear to be indistinguishable from a human would fail with the definition of fair.

I would have given this 2 stars except for the ludicrously saccharine sweet afterword.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback