Watch now

£21.03 + £1.26 delivery
In stock. Sold by RAREWAVES USA

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Great Expectations - Criterion Collection [DVD] [1946] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
      

Great Expectations - Criterion Collection [DVD] [1946] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]


Price: £21.03
Only 1 left in stock.
Dispatched from and sold by RAREWAVES USA.
4 new from £21.02 3 used from £19.99

Amazon Instant Video

Watch Great Expectations instantly from £2.49 with Amazon Instant Video
Region 1 encoding. (requires a North American or multi-region DVD player and NTSC compatible TV. More about DVD formats)
Note: you may purchase only one copy of this product. New Region 1 DVDs are dispatched from the USA or Canada and you may be required to pay import duties and taxes on them (click here for details) Please expect a delivery time of 5-7 days.

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

Great Expectations - Criterion Collection [DVD] [1946] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC] + Oliver Twist [DVD]
Price For Both: £24.69

These items are dispatched from and sold by different sellers.

Buy the selected items together

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Product details

  • Actors: John Mills
  • Directors: David Lean
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 4:3 - 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: Unrated (US MPAA rating. See details.)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (113 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00000F17E
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 145,034 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

44 of 45 people found the following review helpful By no1filmaddict on 22 Dec. 2003
Format: DVD
Out of all the film adaptations of 'Great Expectations', this is by far the best. It captures the warm humour of each charcter, brilliantly and because the film is quite old, the Victorian England set would more or less exactly how it should be, as parts of London in 1946 would still be like that.
One day when pip is out in the Graveyard putting flowers on his parents grave, he comes across an escaped convict whom he takes food to. Many years later while doing his apprentiship as a blacksmith, he is given great wealth and property by an unknown benifactor. Pip has a few ideas of who it could be, but the truth is afr from what he imagined.
In my opinion this is probably one of Charles Dicken's best novels, and even probably one of the best novels ever written. As you will know, reading a Dickens novel is not the easiest of books to read, and this excelent adaptation, allows you to watch it instaed. I do recommend though, that you read the book first as it will assist your understanding of the film, even though the film is very clear as to what is happening.
The acting is simply perfect, especially from young Pip and young Estella who almost seem to 'be' Pip and Estela who have jumped off the pages and come to life. This is what makes a good adaptation.
If you have read the book, then this is a must-see, and if you haven't, then this is still a must see, simply because it is a great film. Beware though, it is in black and white, but this shouldn't matter.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
47 of 48 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 8 Mar. 2000
Format: DVD
From the wonderfully eerie opening scenes on the Essex marshes and Finlay Currie's menacing appearance in a foggy graveyard, you can tell straight away this is a winner. As the story of this "gentleman of great expectations" unfolds, you are treated to one of cinema's classics. David Lean's moody direction keeps you gripped throughout, but it's the acting that really makes the movie: John Mills and Alec Guiness both turn in great performances, and the incidental characters such as Francis L Sullivan's bluff Jaggers and the bumbling but sweet Joe Gargery supplied by Bernard Miles simply steal the show. There have been at least ten versions of this film made. If you only watch one, make it this one: It's a cracker!
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Gemma Watson on 11 Dec. 2006
Format: DVD
Having seen, and been disappointed in, many book-to-film adaptations, this particular version surprised me. It is very true to the book, and apart from Orlick and the Pockets, leaves no major character's story out. The dialogue is mostly lifted straight from Dicken's text, and yet still works quite well on film. The settings are very realistic, Satis House is very impressive and almost exactly as I imagined it to be. If I remember correctly, the ending of the film is the same as the original ending that Dicken's wrote - this helps to tie the film up and works better than the published ending.

My only criticisms would be that John Mills, although a very fine actor, is a poor 'older Pip' for the simple reason that he looks far too old. He was in fact 38 when he made the film by my reckoning... and is not a very believable 20 year old Pip in my opinion. The young Pip (Anthony Wager) and young Estella (Jean Simmons) on the other hand are exactly how I imagined them to be. By the end of the film, it feels like too much has happened in too short a time, and it is quite hard to keep track of everything that has gone on - this is only to be expected considering the length and complexity of the novel, and I for one appreciate that it did not cut any sub-plots out despite the possibility of confusion.

I recommend that you definitely read it first, only then will you be able to appreciate the film fully.

GVW
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By F. S. L'hoir TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 21 Jun. 2008
Format: DVD
There are some films, such as "Casablanca," that should never be remade. David Lean's "Great Expectations" is one of them.

The cast--headed by John Mills as the grown-up Pip, and which includes the rotund Francis L. Sullivan as the lawyer Jagger (whose clients are hanged as a matter of course), Finlay Curry as the convict Magwitch, and Alec Guinness as Herbert Pocket--is pitch-perfect (although I always thought that Valerie Hobson was a bit of a disappointment after the brittle hauteur of Jean Simmons).

This film has everything: humor, suspense, and a lack of the sentimentality that seems to have crept into Dickensian films of late.

Lean, who was to become famous for his sweeping desolate landscapes of "Lawrence of Arabia" and "Dr. Zhivago," captures the essence of the lonely English fog-bound marshes with swirling swathes of grey in this glorious black and white film. The image of young Estella (a bewitching Jean Simmons) leading young Pip by candlelight up the darkened staircase into the cobweb-enshrouded inner sanctum of the demented Miss Havisham (the incomparable Martita Hunt) is unforgettable, as is the sight of the jilted bride's rat-infested wedding cake. Without computer-generated effects or even color, David Lean has created a cinematic masterpiece.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By M. Joyce TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 26 Feb. 2011
Format: DVD
This is truly a film classic. David Lean's films of "Great Expectations" and "Oliver Twist" leave subsequent versions (both film and TV) standing; the cinematography is superb and no other director captures both the genial eccentricity of Dickens's grotesques and the underlying sense of menace which pervades the works. John Mills and Valerie Hobson both look a little mature for the "adult" Pip and Estella, but the former in particular is very good. The young Jean Simmons is especially striking as the young Estella. The performances of the supporting roles are, one might suggest, definitive. These are, of course, the "best parts" in Dickens and a gift to any resourceful character actor. Especially striking are the Mr Jaggers of Francis L. Sullivan (who was surely born to play in Dickens), the grand guignol Miss Havisham of Martita Hunt, Alec Guinness's lively Herbert Pockit, the warmth and humanity of Bernard Miles as Joe Gargery and, notably, Finlay Currie's Magwitch; his appearance in the churchyard is deservedly a classic. A must for any collection!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
dvd never received..? 0 21 Mar 2012
Subtitles? 1 21 Jan 2012
See all 2 discussions...  
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
   



Feedback