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Five Graves to Cairo (Cinco Tumbas al Cairo) Spanish Import


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Five Graves to Cairo (Cinco Tumbas al Cairo) Spanish Import + Tobruk [DVD] + Attack on the Iron Coast [DVD]
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Product details

  • Actors: Franchot Tone, Anne Baxter, Akim Tamiroff, Erich von Stroheim, Peter van Eyck
  • Directors: Billy Wilder
  • Writers: Billy Wilder, Charles Brackett, Lajos Biró
  • Producers: Buddy G. DeSylva, Charles Brackett
  • Format: PAL, Import
  • Language: English, Spanish
  • Subtitles: Spanish
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 4:3 - 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 12
  • Studio: Suevia Films
  • DVD Release Date: 13 Dec. 2006
  • Run Time: 93 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000NA6VQ4
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 158,456 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Product Description

Spain released, PAL/Region 2 DVD: LANGUAGES: English ( Dolby Digital 2.0 ), Spanish ( Dolby Digital 2.0 ), Spanish ( Subtitles ), SPECIAL FEATURES: Biographies, Filmographies, Interactive Menu, SYNOPSIS: June, 1942. The British Army, retreating ahead of victorious Rommel, leaves a lone survivor on the Egyptian border--Corporal John Bramble, who finds refuge at a remote desert hotel...soon to be German HQ. To survive, Bramble assumes an identity which proves perilous. The new guest of honor is none other than Rommel, hinting of his secret strategy, code-named 'five graves.' And the fate of the British in Egypt depends on whether a humble corporal can penetrate the secret... SCREENED/AWARDED AT: Oscar Academy Awards, ...Five Graves to Cairo

Review

Five Graves to Cairo is probably the most conglomerate war film to date. It has a little something for all tastes. --New York Times --This text refers to an alternate DVD edition.

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

28 of 28 people found the following review helpful By bill alford on 22 Oct. 2011
Format: DVD
I warn all buyers of this movie not to be taken in by the statement that it has Dutch subtitles,because even though the soundtrack is in English the subtitles cannot be removed as in all other subtitled films on dvd.Not only that,they seem to cover in large letters a whole segment of the picture - the result being you will be completely put off concentrating on the film and it's soundtrack. What a waste of money!
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By The CinemaScope Cat TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 8 Jan. 2011
Format: DVD
The majority of WWII propaganda films don't hold up very well, this excellent Billy Wilder vehicle is an exception. Set in Egypt, an English soldier (Franchot Tone) is the sole survivor of a battle between British soldiers and Rommel's Afrika Corps. He stumbles upon a small hotel where the Germans are setting up temporary headquarters. With the help of the hotel owner (Akim Tamiroff) and the maid (Anne Baxter), he usurps the identity of the hotel's recently deceased waiter. When the Germans arrive, he discovers he's adopted the identity of a German spy! Not surprisingly, rather than a heavy handed propaganda piece, Wilder and co-writer Charles Brackett's screenplay turns out to be devilishly clever and generously laced with humor while still taking its subject dead serious. The film is stolen by Erich von Stroheim who gives a sly performance as an eccentric, over confident Field Marshal Rommel but Baxter is very good too as a bitter French maiden while Tamiroff's dizzy innkeeper provides the majority of the laughs. It's not till the very end that Wilder saves the proselytizing propaganda but it's very brief and softened by the poignancy of the scene. With Peter Van Eyck and Fortunio Bonanova as an opera singing Italian general.

I viewed the Australian import DVD (courtesy of Madman video) which boasts a handsome restored print and a nice 12 page booklet about the film. If you can get your hands on it, this is the one to go for.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By The Collector on 11 July 2011
Format: DVD
This film is hard to get on DVD, mine was bought in Italy! A very convincing Eric Von Stroheim as a tough, no-nonsense Rommell and Franchot Tone as an edgy and nervous accidental spy. Anne Baxter convinces as a maid torn between doing the right thing or staying alive. Great looking film, much like a classic film noire, a tense atmosphere in a limited plot location from which you really do get the feeling of what it might be like to be a chicken in a fox den! Deserves more attention.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Spike Owen TOP 500 REVIEWER on 15 July 2012
Format: DVD
Film Review Only-Viewed From British TCM.

Five Graves to Cairo is directed by Billy Wilder who also co-adapts the screenplay with Charles Brackett. It's based on the Lajos Biró play Hotel Imperial. It stars Franchot tone, Anne Baxter, Akim Tamiroff, Erich von Stroheim and Peter Van Eyck. Music is by Miklós Rózsa and cinematography by John Seitz.

Tone plays John Bramble, the sole survivor of a British tank division who stumbles into a near deserted desert town only to find it suddenly fill up with Field Marshall Rommel and his troops. Assuming the identity of a dead waiter at the hotel run by Farid (Tamiroff), Bramble gains the trust of everyone only to learn that the waiter he is pretending to be was actually a secret agent for the Germans. If he can keep up the pretence and not get found out, Bramble could have great impact on the North Africa Campaign.

A cracker is this, an early Billy Wilder film that thrives on tension and clever plotting while pulsing with great literate strength. Cast are more than capable of making the material work as well, with Tone nicely restrained, Baxter very touching (decent French accent too) and Von Stroheim a ball of emotions as a complex laden Rommel. Tech credits are grade A stuff, the sound department and Seitz's photography especially lifting the picture still further to classic status. This is no high energy war movie, it's character driven but all the better for it, with Wilder even slotting in moments of humour to sit alongside the sharper edges of the dialogue. From the sombre opening of a tank aimlessly trudging across the desert, its pilot hanging dead from the turret, to a very touching finale involving a parasol, Wilder's movie holds the attention greatly. A masterful story brought to us by a master director. 8/10
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By C. O. DeRiemer HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on 23 Aug. 2008
Format: DVD
This WWII movie is an unexpected delight, although coming from Billy Wilder the unexpected should be expected. The action in Five Graves to Cairo takes place in a flea-bitten, mud-brick hotel on the edge of the North African desert. It's 1942 and Tobruk has fallen. Rommel and the Afrika Corps are driving toward Cairo and the only thing that can stop them is a lack of supplies. The English are worried. The Egyptians are testing the wind. And Rommel seems to be supremely confident. "We shall take that big cigar from Churchill's mouth and make him say 'Heil'!" he says with a smirk. He has reason to be confident. "It's not the supplies which reach us," he says. "It's us who reach the supplies...thousands and thousands of gallons of petrol..." and water, ammunition and food. The only things that can stop him is a British tank corporal, John Bramble (Franchot Tone), the fearful Egyptian owner of the hotel, Farid (Akim Tamiroff), and the angry, resentful hotel maid, Mouche (Anne Baxter).

Bramble stumbled into the hotel after a tank battle that left the rest of his crew dead. Farid took him in reluctantly. Hours later Rommel and his army roared up and took over the hotel. Bramble had to disguise himself as Davos, the club-footed waiter who had been killed in an air-raid and whose body lies buried in the hotel's basement. Rommel (Erich von Stroheim) arrives, imperious and dynamic, and suddenly greets Davos by name. It seems Davos had been a German agent. John Bramble now has to play a very careful game for his life...especially when Rommel brags about the work of a German archeologist, Professor Cronstettler, who in the late Thirties supervised a number of digs...five to be exact...along the North African coast between Tobruk and Alexandria. Rommel shows Davos his map of Egypt.
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