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Granta 116: Ten Years Later (Granta: The Magazine of New Writing) [Paperback]

John Freeman
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
RRP: 12.99
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Book Description

19 Aug 2011 Granta: The Magazine of New Writing (Book 116)
Ten years later, where are we looking? How do we see things differently? From Ground Zero to Kampala to London to Mumbai, the echoes are still heard, the impact is still felt. The way we interact, the way we travel, our relationship to media and technology, and the very way we regard the world we live in have all been irrevocably changed. Granta 116 will examine the consequences of the attacks that occurred on 11 September 2001 from a global perspective. Rather than recounting where we were when it happened and what we saw, this issue will look at how our lives and viewpoints have been altered since that day. Declan Walsh reports from the tribal areas of northwest Pakistan: breeding ground for Al Qaeda and target of U.S. drone strikes. Elliott Woods travels across the US, talking to recruits, noncombatants and veterans and taking the pulse of a nation a decade at war. Pico Iyer considers what air travel is like in the post-9/11 security state; Nicole Krauss writes a melancholy, impressionistic portrait of family, war, life and death in Paris. Adam Johnson and Nuruddin Farah provide extracts from forthcoming novels: in Johnson's, the 'third mate' on a North Korean fishing trawler listens in on mysterious radio transmissions; in Farah's, a father pleads with a Somali warlord for help finding his runaway son. Showcasing some of the most insightful essayists, fiction writers, poets and visual artists working today, Ten Years Later will explore the complexity of how we regard an event that forever shifted our conceptions of fear, anger and hope.

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Granta 116: Ten Years Later (Granta: The Magazine of New Writing) + Granta 115: The F Word + Granta 118: Exit Strategies (Granta: The Magazine of New Writing)
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Product details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Granta Publications Ltd (19 Aug 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1905881355
  • ISBN-13: 978-1905881352
  • Product Dimensions: 2 x 14.7 x 20.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 490,763 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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About the Author

John Freeman has been editor of Granta since 2009. He is the author of The Tyranny of E-Mail and former president of the National Book Critics Circle. His criticism has appeared in The New York Times, the Guardian and the Independent.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Awesome, deep volume 3 Oct 2011
Format:Paperback
This is an awesome collection. It reflects on the aftermath of 9/11 in the US, in the prime targets for revenge, Iraq and Afghanistan, and explores the Arab Spring, airline security and Somalia. Some stories are about US army veterans trying to reintegrate back home. Some regret having joined, others feel they cannot live in today's US, miss the old comradeship and want to return to battle.
War victims are also given space. Afghan warlords reacted quickly to US offers of $ 5.000 for any Taliban caught, condemning many innocent people to a long stay in Guantanamo after being tortured elsewhere. A Moroccan-born, UK-based cook, states his case after suffering 3 years of solitary confinement there. So does his lawyer, who explains his client is bi-polar and was temping in a Chelsea restaurant at the time of his alleged crimes in Afghanistan. But still, his client was caught in Afghanistan... Nuruddin Farah story is an extract from his new novel "Crossbones" in which a Minnesota-based Somali exile searches for his son. He fears he has joined the extremist Shabaab, in a Somalia the father has trouble understanding or surviving once he arrives.

Anthony Shadid provides a history of the now defunct Baghdad College, established in 1932 by US Jesuits, using its yearbooks and interviews with surviving staff and students as source material. Amazing piece of history.
Tahar Ben Jelloun portrays with great empathy the poor Tunisian fruit seller's state of mind before setting himself on fire, the event that sparked the Arab Spring, and pays respect to an unknown Egyptian, picked up because the police needed a quick confession for something. He died within hours. Two examples of callousness by Arab regimes' poorly-paid police forces.
Every report and story in this issue is deep, incisive and instructive. Buy it, borrow it, read it from start to finish.
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By Eileen Shaw TOP 1000 REVIEWER
Format:Paperback
Ten years after 9/11, what has happened to the world? Capitalism seems to be in meltdown but only as a theory. Otherwise, things go on much as they have done forever. Forever being however long the oldest among us can remember. How could we possibly imagine anything else? What did we expect? Or not us exactly - but America. We have aligned ourselves with America, it seems to be a place that might understand us, for we have had terrorism for quite a bit longer, courtesy of our Irish cousins. But then that wasn't proper terrorism, was it? It wasn't a strike at the land of the free. It was a campaign by the disaffected against their overlords, or it was certainly portrayed as such by the British press. But against Bin Laden's provocation the answer came from the throats of America, who disregarded the Geneva Convention, by which rules two World Wars had been fought, and used torture on its enemies. We - the British - were said to have acquiesced in the movement of victims to places where torture was carried out. But we don't get to know about that. It's too sensitive. It's MI5, or 6, or anyway, something like that.

The targets for America's response were people from Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, or born in Britain, even in America, but anyway, alienated from their country of birth. Muslim, anyway, that strange (to us) religion so much like Christianity, yet bent to such fearful and terrifying ends. Their crimes were unproven, overwhelmingly so in the case of those imprisoned at Guantanamo Bay. Some of those imprisoned will never be free, and will never stand trial either. But none of this, or very little, is addressed by the writers of this issue.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.3 out of 5 stars  3 reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fiction is ogten more truthful than... 28 Oct 2011
By Alessandro Baktyar - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Relevant. At times gut-wrenching in its honesty (and simplicity)--adage to fiction is the TRUE depiction of history. The writing is not always excellent--and hence the 4 stars--but it is definitely relevant to our understanding of a horrendous event and how it changed so many lives in so many ways. Some stories are excellent, some not so--what you would expect from any anthology.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Opened my eyes 15 Mar 2012
By Azima - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Amazing stories in the aftermath of 9/11. I think every American should at least read the story by Phil Klay, a U.S. Marine who found himself struggling to adjust to civilian life after months in Iraq. We're all paying for this disaster of a war, but it's so easy to just ignore the consequences if we don't have a loved one over there fighting. As the other reviewers have made clear, it's not just a collection of war stories, and the perspective is international. I'm recommending it to everyone I know, hawks and doves alike.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Awesome, diverse collection of reports and stories 3 Oct 2011
By P. A. Doornbos - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I simply cannot believe that I am the first person to review this awesome collection. It reflects on the aftermath, 10 years later, of 9/11 in the prime targets for revenge, Iraq and Afghanistan and explores the Arab Spring, airline security and Somalia. Some stories are about and by US army veterans trying to reintegrate back home. Some regret having gone, others feel they do not fit in today's US, miss the old comradeship and want to return to battle.
War victims are also given space. Afghan warlords reacted quickly to offers of $5.000 for any Taliban caught, condemning many innocent men to a long stay in Guantanamo after being tortured elsewhere. A Moroccan, UK-based cook states his case after suffering 3 years of solitary confinement there. So does his lawyer, who explains his client is bi-polar and was temping in a Chelsea restaurant at the time of his alleged crimes in Afghanistan. But it was there where his client was captured, so...
Nuruddin Farah's story is an extract from his new novel "Crossbones" in which a Minnesota-based Somali exile begins a search for his son. The father fears he has joined the extremist Shabaab in a Somalia he has trouble understanding or surviving once he arrives.

Anthony Shadid provides a history of the once nation-building, now defunct Baghdad College, established in 1932 by US Jesuits, using its yearbooks and interviews with surviving staff and students as source material. Amazing piece of history.

Tahar Ben Jelloun portrays with great empathy the poor Tunisian fruit seller's state of mind before setting himself on fire, which sparked the Arab Spring and pays respect to an unknown Egyptian, picked up because the police needed a quick confession from someone for something. He died within hours. Two examples of callousness by Arab regimes' poorly-paid police forces.
Every report and story in this issue is deep, incisive and instructive. Buy it, borrow it, read it from start to finish.
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