The Grand Budapest Hotel 2014

Amazon Instant Video

Available in HD
(1,057) IMDb 8.1/10

THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL recounts the adventures of legendary concierge Gustave H. and Zero Moustafa, the lobby boy who becomes his most trusted friend.

Starring:
Adrian Brody,Mathieu Amalric
Runtime:
1 hour, 39 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

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Product Details

Genres Comedy
Director Wes Anderson
Starring Adrian Brody, Mathieu Amalric
Supporting actors F. Murray Abraham, Tony Revolori, Ralph Fiennes
Studio Fox Searchlight
BBFC rating Suitable for 15 years and over
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

181 of 191 people found the following review helpful By Dr Nick on 20 July 2014
Format: Blu-ray
Witty, funny, clever and engaging, and yet with an undercurrent of tragedy and loss that is achingly poignant in places. This film tells the story of the unlikely friendship between a young Lobby Boy and his mentor, the hotel concierge, played to perfection by Ralph Fiennes as Monsieur Gustav H. The story is told in multiple flashback from the present (?) to the 1930's, like peeling back the layers of an onion and centres on the story of his induction into the Grand Hotel Budapest as told by an aged Zero (the Lobby Boy) to an author in the late 1960's. He recounts his adventures with M. Gustav during the early 1930's, in a fictional eastern European republic, when the Grand Hotel, still clinging to a ghost of its turn-of-the Century heyday, is run by the almost bi-polar M. Gustav (poetry-reading Victorian prim one second, swearing like a trooper the next) who likes to see to his lady guests 'every' need, no matter how old they are.

Murder, mayhem, mystery and prison ensue, with a host of marvellous supporting actors, while M.Gustav, ably assisted by Zero, remains unflappable and downright funny to boot. Despite all the comedy, there is no fairy-tale ending. The spectre of 1930's dictatorships and war hovers at the edges of the story and the sadness and loss, not just of friends and loved ones, but of a whole way of life and 'how it used to be' in the words of the aged Zero, is palpable and very touching without detracting at all from the comedy that went before it.

A great film with great actors, that works on so many levels. Definitely one to buy and watch again.
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133 of 146 people found the following review helpful By Lola TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 21 Jun. 2014
Format: Blu-ray
For all the times I watch mediocre attempts at comedy, I am rewarded with films such as this, "The Grand Budapest Hotel", which is not only visually stunning, it is also the most amusing comedy farce!

Ah Wes Anderson, his films overflow with elaborate detail and occur in their own enchanting world. "The Grand Budapest Hotel" is my new classic - it is a wedding cake of a film, it is filled with eccentrics and lunatics and oddballs. It looks delightful, it is delicious!

The film also reminded me why I once fell in love with Ralph Fiennes - he shines in the rare comic role as M. Gustave, a concierge who brilliantly survives between gentlemen and criminals, whose language is a mix of politeness and filth and high poetry and swearing. Yes, his poetry never leaves him, even when M. Gustave finds himself in the middle of murder investigation of a rich woman (the loyal guest of the hotel and his lover, one of many) who (potentially) bequeathed all her property to him. At M. Gustave's side is his loyal apprentice, Zero (and I applaud the newcomer Toni Revolori and his moustache-drawing skills!), and what M. Gustave would do without him!

"The Grand Budapest Hotel" is a winning whimsical comedy with star appearances of Jason Schwartzman, Bill Murray (the moustache!), Owen Wilson, Tilda Swinton etc. etc. It challenges your sense of humour - and I dare you not to love it! It's a celebration. Perhaps of a time and age long gone.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Andres C. Salama on 25 Jan. 2015
Format: DVD
I avoided this movie when it came out, since the last two films I've seen of director Wes Anderson, The Light Aquatic and the Darjeelingf Limnited, were utterly terrible. Only with the recent multiple Oscar nominations of this movie, I decide to give it a chance. And guess what: it is a great movie, his best since the Royal Tennenbaums. Set mostly in the 1930s in a fictional Central European state (the film was mostly shot in Southern Germany) - though with a nifty introduction from the 1960s that frames the narrative with Jude Law and F. Murray Abraham - the Grand Hotel Budapest tells the story of the said hotel - one in the classical European style - that is run by the concierge M. Gustave (Ralph Fiennes) helped by the bellboy Zero (Tony Revolori)

Fiennes is great as Gustave, a cultured, suave womanizer specialized in wooing elderly ladies who sees himself as a beacon of civilization in an age of increasing barbarism. When one of his "customers" (Tilda Swinton) dies and decides to give part of her inheritance to Mustafa, her two psycho sons (Adrien Brody and Willem Dafoe) will left no stone unturned in trying not to give others what they think is rightfully theirs.

This movie has an impressive all star cast. Along with those already named, we also have Edward Norton, Jeff Goldblum, Harvey Keiteñ, Saoirse Ronan, Mathieu Amalric and (in smaller roles), Bill Murray, Lea Seydoux, Owen Wilson and Jason Schwartzmann. And Anderson's mannerisms and eccentricities are not so off putting here (well, maybe with exceptions, like what does the mole with the size of Mexico in Saoirse Ronan means?). Inspired by the writings of Stefan Zweig.
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26 of 29 people found the following review helpful By M. Dowden HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 6 Feb. 2015
Format: DVD
We all know that some films are good, some are bad, and others you feel completely indifferent about. But at times something comes along that is just that extra bit special and makes you sit up and take notice, The Grand Budapest Hotel being one of these special films. With larger than life characters, a story that is slightly unreal and wonderfully set, this is a film to be relished rather than just watched whilst having a nibble.

Ralph Fiennes as M. Gustave is in magnificent form as the concierge of the magnificent Grand Budapest Hotel. As he finds that a new lobby boy, Zero, has been employed, he takes him under his wing and teaches him the ropes. But this is 1932 in an Eastern European country, and things start to change with the world and its leaders. When Gustave is accused of murder this starts to swing into a slightly screwball tale of imprisonment, escape and proving your innocence. Both funny and thoughtful this conjures up the world at a certain time in history, namely that before and throughout two World Wars, and the coming of an even newer Communistic leadership.

Told with aplomb this is a story that will more than keep your attention, with great acting throughout, and a very entertaining storyline. Dedicated to Stefan Zweig this is a wonderful tribute in some ways, and how he described the world that he lived in with all its problems. It has to be admitted that Ralph Fiennes steals this film with the role of Gustave, a man well connected, of dubious sexuality, and also being able to act the perfect gentleman and servant.

This DVD does come with subtitles as well as a few extras. If you want to know how to make one of those little confections from Mendl’s you will find the recipe in these extras, as well as some featurettes, etc. In all this is really a wonderful film that I should think will end up on your favourites list.
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