Trade in Yours
For a 1.58 Gift Card
Trade in
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Tell the Publisher!
Id like to read this book on Kindle

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Goodness Had Nothing To Do (VMC) [Paperback]

Mae West
3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

Available from these sellers.


Trade In this Item for up to 1.58
Trade in Goodness Had Nothing To Do (VMC) for an Amazon Gift Card of up to 1.58, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Book Description

5 Sep 1996 VMC (Book 1795)
This autobiography traces Mae West's indulged Brooklyn childhood, through vaudeville success, a stage career which landed her in jail for the outspokenness of her lines, to spectacular Hollywood stardom. Witty and honest, she remained in control of her life, her career and her many, many loves.


Product details

  • Paperback: 277 pages
  • Publisher: Virago; New Ed edition (5 Sep 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1860490344
  • ISBN-13: 978-1860490347
  • Product Dimensions: 12.5 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 940,286 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Sell a Digital Version of This Book in the Kindle Store

If you are a publisher or author and hold the digital rights to a book, you can sell a digital version of it in our Kindle Store. Learn more

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars
3.3 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars What a Woman! What a Star! What an Ego! 29 Aug 2003
Format:Paperback
Originally written in the 1950s and later updated in the early 1970s, GOODNESS HAD NOTHING TO DO WITH IT is the autobiography of the celebrated Mae West, one of the 20th century's greatest stars of stage and screen. It is an entertaining read, and in her writings West perfectly captures that unique tone and way with words that made her world famous.
But whether she intended it to be so or not, the most interesting thing about the autobiography is its revelation of the incredible ego that drove her. To hear her tell it, West was born with absolute self-awareness, knew what she wanted from the cradle, and was well on her way to getting it before she could walk. Be it saving the life of a drowning child, doing a lion-taming act, or living out the life of sex goddess to end all sex goddesses, Mae West did it first--and if not first, at least better. And if either of those are a matter of opinion, there is clearly only one opinion that counts with West: hers.
Sometimes she is factually inaccurate, as in her assesment of the box office success of MY LITTLE CHICKADEE (it was not a big hit at the time.) Sometimes she simply ignores an unpleasant fact or two, as when she declares that her film work ended because no one could offer her a good script (in truth, her screen career ended because public taste had changed and her films simply weren't living up to box office expectations any more.) But the truly astonishing thing about her various claims is how often they really are correct: yes, she really did save Paramount from bankruptcy; yes, she really was the highest-paid star in 1930s Hollywood; yes, her stage work was every bit as legendary as she says it was.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Double Entendre Had Everything To Do With It! 4 Jun 2008
Format:Paperback
Mae West considered writing her autobiography as early as 1957 and several publishing houses had already approached her. A flood in the mid-thirties destroyed documents of her early vaudeville appearances stored in the basement of her Hollywood apartment building, The Ravenswood, and other papers stored at her ranch house were eaten by rats.
Since arriving in Hollywood, her film career had been well-documented, but West had only a faint recollection of what happened and where. She asked Larry lee, who assisted her with the novelization of "Diamond Lil" to research her early stage career. Lee suggested they try writing a few chapters to see how things went. Eventually Stephen Longstreet, an author who ghosted other star biographies came on board to help West pull together her book, and was given credit for his "editorial assistance." West apparently supervised everything and pointed out, "Nobody can write about me except me," a remarkable feat considering she barely completed the third grade.
The driving force in West's decision to pen her memoirs was that someone else might try to write an unauthorized account of her life and there wasn't much she could do about it since much of her life had been spent in the public domain. Initially West protested that she had so much more to do with her life, but friends pointed out she could write a sequel in the future. Some of the the early working titles West had in mind for her memoirs were "Queen of Sex," and "Come Up and See Me Sometime."
Although West's autobiography went through several printings in hardback and soft cover, critic's reaction to her account of her life was mixed.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars GOODNESS HAD NOTHING TO DO WITH IT 8 July 2013
By JO-AN
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
MORE LIKE IT not good that i never recieved the book and it took ages to get my refund . i wish i was not given the runaround regarding when it will be deliverd only weeks and weeks late to be told that it is not in stock ! i let you make up your mind about this
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.8 out of 5 stars  12 reviews
29 of 30 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars What a Woman! What a Star! What an Ego! 23 Aug 2003
By Gary F. Taylor - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Originally written in the 1950s and later updated in the early 1970s, GOODNESS HAD NOTHING TO DO WITH IT is the autobiography of the celebrated Mae West, one of the 20th century's greatest stars of stage and screen. It is an entertaining read, and in her writings West perfectly captures that unique tone and way with words that made her world famous.
But whether she intended it to be so or not, the most interesting thing about the autobiography is its revelation of the incredible ego that drove her. To hear her tell it, West was born with absolute self-awareness, knew what she wanted from the cradle, and was well on her way to getting it before she could walk. Be it saving the life of a drowning child, doing a lion-taming act, or living out the life of sex goddess to end all sex goddesses, Mae West did it first--and if not first, at least better. And if either of those are a matter of opinion, there is clearly only one opinion that counts with West: hers.
Sometimes she is factually inaccurate, as in her assesment of the box office success of MY LITTLE CHICKADEE (it was not a big hit at the time.) Sometimes she simply ignores an unpleasant fact or two, as when she declares that her film work ended because no one could offer her a good script (in truth, her screen career ended because public taste had changed and her films simply weren't living up to box office expectations any more.) But the truly astonishing thing about her various claims is how often they really are correct: yes, she really did save Paramount from bankruptcy; yes, she really was the highest-paid star in 1930s Hollywood; yes, her stage work was every bit as legendary as she says it was.
If West's autobiography often comes off as boastful, it has reason to be so; even so, the tone of unending self-praise does have a way of wearing a bit thin after a while, and now and then a little humility would not have been amiss. And if you're expecting a litany of lovers and bedroom details, you will no doubt be disappointed in the book. West gives few details and names no names.
Even so, it is a fascinating--or should I say fascinatin'--read. It was a indeed a brilliant career, a remarkable life, a memorable personality. If you're a fan, this is a must have.
--GFT (Amazon.com Reviewer)--
16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Double Entendre Had Everything To Do With It 25 Nov 2006
By R. M. Desjardins - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
Mae West considered writing her autobiography as early as 1957 and several publishing houses had already approached her. A flood in the mid-thirties destroyed documents of her early vaudeville appearances stored in the basement of her Hollywood apartment building, The Ravenswood, and other papers stored at her ranch house were eaten by rats.
Since arriving in Hollywood, her film career had been well-documented, but West had only a faint recollection of what happened and where. She asked Larry lee, who assisted her with the novelization of "Diamond Lil" to research her early stage career. Lee suggested they try writing a few chapters to see how things went. Eventually Stephen Longstreet, an author who ghosted other star biographies came on board to help West pull together her book, and was given credit for his "editorial assistance." West apparently supervised everything and pointed out, "Nobody can write about me except me," a remarkable feat considering she barely completed the third grade.
The driving force in West's decision to pen her memoirs was that someone else might try to write an unauthorized account of her life and there wasn't much she could do about it since much of her life had been spent in the public domain. Initially West protested that she had so much more to do with her life, but friends pointed out she could write a sequel in the future. Some of the the early working titles West had in mind for her memoirs were "Queen of Sex," and "Come Up and See Me Sometime."
Although West's autobiography went through several printings in hardback and soft cover, critic's reaction to her account of her life was mixed. Theatre Arts stated "the heart of gold is outweighed by the purse of gold and the gloating over box-office grosses," while the New York Times reviewer found West's tome "theatre wise, basically clean, sometimes corny, often entertaining yarn."
Perhaps Mae West's self penned novel, "Babe Gordon," published in 1930 and later rechristened, "The Constant Sinner," was closer to the actual events of her life, that she dared not reveal in her later biography. The inside panel of the original cover proclaimed, "Constantly sinning and constant to her sin, Babe Gordon, the heroine of this vigorous story belongs to that rare type of woman who uses her beauty and sexual allure as a soldier uses his weapons - without mercy or scruple. She is irresistible to every type of man, from the bruisers of the prize ring to the sensitive sons of aristocracy. She is canny, worldly wise, quick thinking. All her art , her wisdom, her will is to love; and when her passion for one man cools, she kindles it in another.
In a classic example of life imitating art, Mae West was outraged when Confidential magazine featured an expose on her private life alleging her sexual proclivity for black men. Chalky Wright, "a bronze boxer" whom West had met was "invited up to see her sometime" and ended up living with her for a year. Confidential magazine claimed "West's favorite color combination, as only the men in her life know, is black and white."
As a result of Mae West's appearance in Myra Breckinridge in 1970, interest in her was at an all-time high, and MacFadden-Bartell published an updated edition of her biography in paperback.
West asked George Eiferman, a former 1948 Mr. America, and 1962 Mr. Universe title holder, to write an eight page appendix entitled "My Story," explaining the events that led to Chuck Krauser aka Paul Novak knocking out Mickey Hargitay. West sagely secured affidavits from the other bodybuilders in the act supporting her statement that she had never shown romantic interest in Haritay. When asked why it would possibly matter years after the fact, West pointed out, "That's where you're not thinkin' clear. It's when he gets desperate that he'll try to peddle a story, '"I was the One Man Mae West Wanted but Couldn't Get."
West's prophesy was realized when Gordon Mitchell, one of the muscleman in her Vegas act was quoted in the July 2001 issue of Premier : "Mickey won't tell you this but I will. Mae was crazy about him! He was the first guy who ever rejected her." Other chapters in West's updated memoirs dealt with the filming of Myra Breckinridge and outlined plans for future projects.
For the serious student of Mae West lore, "Goodness Had Nothing To Do With It" is an excellant starting off point to discover why Mae West can be considered the most fascinating woman of the Twentieth Century.
19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Greatest has everything to do with it 25 Aug 1999
By Anthony J DAguanno - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This is as close to a personal meeting with this remarkable woman as anyone could ever hope to get. Miss West's autobiography reads as though she were in the room dictating it word for word. It's all here; the humor, the wit, the history, and her life as she wanted it to be known. There are some great photos included as well. A lot of fun to read-I just wish it were longer!
15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What A Woman!!! 14 Jun 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This was an amusing and interesting autobiography by that goddess of sensuality and inventor of the innuendo, Mae West. If you like her, you'll love this book. If you're indifferent to her, you'll still appreciate this tale of life in the theatre and film industries from the early part of this century. If you don't like her, then all I can say is what's your damage?
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Double Entendre Had Everything To Do With It 20 May 2007
By R. Mark Desjardins - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Mae West considered writing her autobiography as early as 1957 and several publishing houses had already approached her. A flood in the mid-thirties destroyed documents of her early vaudeville appearances stored in the basement of her Hollywood apartment building, The Ravenswood, and other papers stored at her ranch house were eaten by rats.
Since arriving in Hollywood, her film career had been well-documented, but West had only a faint recollection of what happened and where. She asked Larry lee, who assisted her with the novelization of "Diamond Lil" to research her early stage career. Lee suggested they try writing a few chapters to see how things went. Eventually Stephen Longstreet, an author who ghosted other star biographies came on board to help West pull together her book, and was given credit for his "editorial assistance." West apparently supervised everything and pointed out, "Nobody can write about me except me," a remarkable feat considering she barely completed the third grade.
The driving force in West's decision to pen her memoirs was that someone else might try to write an unauthorized account of her life and there wasn't much she could do about it since much of her life had been spent in the public domain. Initially West protested that she had so much more to do with her life, but friends pointed out she could write a sequel in the future. Some of the the early working titles West had in mind for her memoirs were "Queen of Sex," and "Come Up and See Me Sometime."
Although West's autobiography went through several printings in hardback and soft cover, critic's reaction to her account of her life was mixed. Theatre Arts stated "the heart of gold is outweighed by the purse of gold and the gloating over box-office grosses," while the New York Times reviewer found West's tome "theatre wise, basically clean, sometimes corny, often entertaining yarn."
Perhaps Mae West's self penned novel, "Babe Gordon," published in 1930 and later rechristened, "The Constant Sinner," was closer to the actual events of her life, that she dared not reveal in her later biography. The inside panel of the original cover proclaimed, "Constantly sinning and constant to her sin, Babe Gordon, the heroine of this vigorous story belongs to that rare type of woman who uses her beauty and sexual allure as a soldier uses his weapons - without mercy or scruple. She is irresistible to every type of man, from the bruisers of the prize ring to the sensitive sons of aristocracy. She is canny, worldly wise, quick thinking. All her art , her wisdom, her will is to love; and when her passion for one man cools, she kindles it in another.
In a classic example of life imitating art, Mae West was outraged when Confidential magazine featured an expose on her private life alleging her sexual proclivity for black men. Chalky Wright, "a bronze boxer" whom West had met was "invited up to see her sometime" and ended up living with her for a year. Confidential magazine claimed "West's favorite color combination, as only the men in her life know, is black and white."
As a result of Mae West's appearance in Myra Breckinridge in 1970, interest in her was at an all-time high, and MacFadden-Bartell published an updated edition of her biography in paperback.
West asked George Eiferman, a former 1948 Mr. America, and 1962 Mr. Universe title holder, to write an eight page appendix entitled "My Story," explaining the events that led to Chuck Krauser aka Paul Novak knocking out Mickey Hargitay. West sagely secured affidavits from the other bodybuilders in the act supporting her statement that she had never shown romantic interest in Hargitay. When asked why it would possibly matter years after the fact, West pointed out, "That's where you're not thinkin' clear. It's when he gets desperate that he'll try to peddle a story, '"I was the One Man Mae West Wanted but Couldn't Get."
West's prophesy was realized when Gordon Mitchell, one of the muscleman in her Vegas act was quoted in the July 2001 issue of Premier : "Mickey won't tell you this but I will. Mae was crazy about him! He was the first guy who ever rejected her." Other chapters in West's updated memoirs dealt with the filming of Myra Breckinridge and outlined plans for future projects.
For the serious student of Mae West lore, "Goodness Had Nothing To Do With It" is an excellant starting off point to discover why Mae West can be considered the most fascinating woman of the Twentieth Century.
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback