More Options
Goodbye Yellow Brick Road (40th Anniversary Celebration)
 
See larger image
 

Goodbye Yellow Brick Road (40th Anniversary Celebration)

24 Mar. 2014 | Format: MP3

£3.49 (VAT included if applicable)
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
11:05
30
2
3:48
30
3
5:22
30
4
3:12
30
5
2:23
30
6
3:59
30
7
3:37
30
8
5:56
30
9
3:53
30
10
4:22
30
11
5:00
30
12
5:08
30
13
2:41
30
14
4:54
30
15
4:07
30
16
3:42
30
17
2:44
Your Amazon Music account is currently associated with a different marketplace. To enjoy Prime Music, go to Your Music Library and transfer your account to Amazon.co.uk (UK).
  

Product details

  • Original Release Date: 1 Jan. 2014
  • Release Date: 24 Mar. 2014
  • Label: UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)
  • Copyright: (C) 2014 This Record Company Ltd.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:15:53
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00IKGDZV2
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (211 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 234 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Guitar_lover on 25 Mar. 2014
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Unquestionably a five star album, we should all know by now just how good it is. Obviously some of Elton's finest work on the labum, Funeral For A Friend/Love Lies Bleeding is an epic song worthy of inclusion on any classic rock list and this lengthy double album just rolls out great song after great song. Some people claim some tracks on this album are just 'fillers' which is complete nonsense. The album flows beautifully and a particular favourite moment comes when Your Sistser Can't Twist blasts straight into Saturday Night's Alright. Just brilliant.

Anyway, this 40th Anniversary edition has been nicely remastered (and while not in this package the new vinyls also sound fab) and comes beeutifully presented in a VHS kinda sized box, with a glorious hardback book. The CDs and DVD are all in slim card sleeves with nice artwork for each. Great to have the 70s docu on DVD and the Live discs are fantastic. The only downside to the bonus content is the revisited section, most of the covers are distinctively average at best with only John Grant, Imelda May and the Zac Brown Band standing out, struggled to listen to the rest. However the other bonus material on this disc is great concluding with Elton's brilliant version of The Who's Pinball Wizard. All in all a fantastic package commemoration 40 years of a true classic album.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
24 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Jervis VINE VOICE on 13 April 2007
Format: Audio CD
While it is possible to argue that there are perhaps a couple of Elton John albums which may rival (or even better) 'Goodbye Yellow Brick Road' in terms of song quality, there aren't any that have managed to match it in stylistic range. In other words 'Goodbye Yellow Brick Road' successfully manages to encompass every facet of Elton's musical styles in a double album package that is sharp and bright in tone with enough variety to never seem boring. It also makes a strong case against those who feel Elton's forte is in being a bland balladeer.
Rock 'n' roll - ' Your Sister Can't Twist ..', 'Saturday Night's Alright For Fighting', reggae - 'Jamaica Jerk Off', and soul - 'Bennie And The Jets', sits perfectly alongside Elton's more traditional ballads such as the well known 'Candle In The Wind' and 'Harmony' in an album that works on every level.
Bernie Taupin's lyrics are also varied in terms of theme ranging from his tribute to Marilyn Monroe - 'Candle In The Wind', prostitution - 'Sweet Painted Lady', cowboys - 'Roy Rogers', the film 'Goodbye Yellow Brick Road' and the unusual, futuristic 'Bennie And The Jets'.
Not every song is prime Elton though - 'Social Disease' and 'All The Girls Love Alice' aren't particularly striking but to be fair they're not exactly bad either.
Versitility is the key to the greatness of 'Goodbye Yellow Brick Road', whether musically, lyrically and also in Elton's vocal performance. In fact it's refreshing to hear what a really fine and versitile voice Elton had in his youth and it's an album like this that blows away any hint of the personality driven Elton in more recent years who's forte when he does record tends to be more often than not, boring and overblown ballads.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Mr. M. A. Tomlinson on 18 Jan. 2002
Format: Audio CD
It's rare to find an album, let alone a double album, where one cannot find a bad track but Goodbye Yellow Brick Road is that album. From the sweeping and atmospheric 'Funeral for a Friend' to the heartbreaking 'Harmony' (it was special to me way back in the 70's!) via 'Roy Rogers' cod country (check out Eltons twang!)and the rocky little 'Your Sister can't twist' and 'Dirty Little Girl' all the bases are covered, no style left unturned. Even if I wasn't such a fan (and I own EJ albums that only his mum bought!)this one would be in my collection. It should be in yours.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Philbee on 29 July 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This review is for the Hybrid SACD Deluxe version, but using a normal CD player - SACD owners whose players can play the Super Audio layer on the disc might be treated to an even better experience!

Anyone who was around when this first came out will remember it being a seminal moment in early-70's pop history - the sleeve artwork alone made you want to leave out on the coffee table to show off (until Sade's 'Diamond Life' came along). Looking back, perhaps some of Elton's other albums are more musically coherent, but by the time this was released (1973) he was well into his 'entertainer' phase and the wide range of musical styles on the album captures the times perfectly. When CDs first came out in 1980, the first track I wanted to have demonstrated at the local HiFi shop was the massive opener, 'Funeral for a Friend/Love Lies Bleeding'. It was brave of Elton to open a double album with a funeral, but the majesty of it is still powerfully resonant and it gets the set off with a mighty kick.

What drew me to this deluxe edition was a hoped-for improvement in the sound quality - and I wasn't disappointed. Elton's albums are always beautifully crafted, but compared to my original CD copy, this Deluxe version opens everything up sonically. The original CD release sounds thin and constricted - it has none of the presence or natural 'bloom' of the deluxe version. We're not talking 'loudness' here - but it's like you've moved about twenty rows nearer the soundstage and are being treated to the subtleties in the instrumentation and performances. It's well worth Elton fans checking out his other albums that have been given the Deluxe treatment, which similarly gets you nearer the action. This isn't a money-making exercise - Elton wants you to hear his music in the best quality possible, and this version certainly fits the bill.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for similar items by category