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Goodbye (Remastered)
 
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Goodbye (Remastered)

9 Mar. 1998 | Format: MP3

£3.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £5.32 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
9:13
30
2
6:20
30
3
5:04
30
4
2:47
30
5
3:18
30
6
3:57
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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
This album was released after the band had already split.
Three great live tracks and three great studio tracks.
I'm So Glad, Politician and Sitting On Top of the World are the live cuts and splendid they are too. Great trio interplay with guitar and bass slightly better recorded than Gingers drums. Jack's tonsils get some work out.
Badge is Eric Clapton's studio track and is a really fine song with some fine pumping bass from Jack behind Eric's singing.
Doing That Scrapyard Thing is an off the wall belter from Jack Bruce with completely silly lyrics and a cheeky vocal performance.
What A Bringdown penned by Ginger Baker is a winner too. The album sleeve credits Ginger with vocals but it sounds like Eric to me? Jack wails the loud bits. Its a very percussive track as one would expect. Fine work from Jack on piano and organ.
The fourth of four fantastic Cream recordings.
At their best one of the most exciting groups ever. Cream used improvisation more than any other group outside of jazz. I guess thats why most so called rock journalists dont like them now. They were far too adventurous and unpredictable. Not for them the never ending cliches of the so called superstar groups who went on for years playing the same stuff year in and year out.
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Format: Audio CD
Cream's studio music falls, at first sight, into three periods. The first ('Fresh Cream') was when the band were trying, with varying degress of success, to establish their sound. The second was the psychedelic 'Disraeli' one, when they gained their commercial success (the earlier 'Fresh Cream' material didn't sell very well). The third was the progressive material, represented by 'White Room' and so on. Then the band split, and this 'posthumous' recording was rather ignored by record buyers at the time, though a fair number of keen Cream fans bought it.
In my opinion, 'Goodbye' suggests that the band made a really big mistake in splitting when they did. There are some truly great tracks on here, easily as good as anything on their other albums, and in several cases considerably better. In some ways it represents a fourth type of Cream music, totally proficient technically, with great songwriting that had left the Blues way behind and was taking them far beyond what they'd already achieved on their earlier albums. 'Badge' is just one such example.
Personally, I think that Jack, Ginger and Eric all went downhill after this album. Blind Faith led nowhere; the Baker Gurvitz Army were interesting, but perhaps the earlier Gun were better; Jack sacrificed sheer excitement for jazz and complexity; Ginger headed into jazz, but it's a very challenging style in which few can be true masters; and Eric became very popular, but with his amplifier turned down and many fans longing for blistering 'Bluesbreaker' type material that never truly re-materialised.
Creativity often relies on tension, and there was tension a plenty in Cream, thanks to Bruce and Baker's arguments and fistfights when they were in the Graham Bond Organisation.
Read more ›
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By Victor HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 20 Jan. 2012
Format: Audio CD
Cream's 1969 farewell album was the end of an era in British music, and the end of the most creative and musically brilliant era in the lives of each of the three members. The tensions within the group were a double edged sword, on the one hand driving them to greater musical heights, on the other making it impossible for the three to work together. It is a shame that the destructive won out over the constructive. Musically the three were at the top of their game here. The sound had moved on a little from the raw power of their first release and the psychadelia tinge of Disraeli Gears, a more polished style is in evidence. The album comprises of three studio and three live recordings, and shows the full range of the trios talents as musicians. Powerful, but with a smoother edge, still laden with coruscating intensity and visionary boundary pushing, this really was the apogee of the British blues movement in the `60s, the point towards which all those bands from Chris Barber to John Mayall to Alexis Korner had worked. It was never better. 5 star album.
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By Victor HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 20 Jan. 2012
Format: Audio CD
Cream's 1969 farewell album was the end of an era in British music, and the end of the most creative and musically brilliant era in the lives of each of the three members. The tensions within the group were a double edged sword, on the one hand driving them to greater musical heights, on the other making it impossible for the three to work together. It is a shame that the destructive won out over the constructive. Musically the three were at the top of their game here. The sound had moved on a little from the raw power of their first release and the psychadelia tinge of Disraeli Gears, a more polished style is in evidence. The album comprises of three studio and three live recordings, and shows the full range of the trios talents as musicians. Powerful, but with a smoother edge, still laden with coruscating intensity and visionary boundary pushing, this really was the apogee of the British blues movement in the `60s, the point towards which all those bands from Chris Barber to John Mayall to Alexis Korner had worked. It was never better. 5 star album.

This version also contains 'Anyone For Tennis', released as a non-album single, as an extra. Well worth a listen.
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