Watch now

Buy used:
£0.34
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by zoverstocks
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Buy with confidence from a huge UK seller with over 3 million feedback ratings, all items despatched next day directly from the UK. All items are quality guaranteed.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Gonin [DVD]
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
      

Gonin [DVD]

7 customer reviews

Available from these sellers.
6 new from £11.99 8 used from £0.34

Special Offers and Product Promotions


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Product details

  • Actors: Kôichi Satô, Masahiro Motoki, Jinpachi Nezu, Kippei Shîna, Naoto Takenaka
  • Directors: Takashi Ishii
  • Writers: Takashi Ishii
  • Producers: Katsuhide Motoki, Kazuyoshi Okuyama, Taketo Niitsu, Takuto Niizu
  • Format: PAL
  • Language: Japanese
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 18
  • Studio: Mia
  • DVD Release Date: 27 Dec. 2001
  • Run Time: 110 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00005RZT0
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 66,419 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Product Description

Five men, each teetering on the brink of collapse, all decide to take on the Yakuza in one final desperate attempt to save their dignity. The five plan and execute a successful raid on a Yakuza headquarters, getting away with nearly a hundred million yen. But the Yakuza know how to deal with such upstarts, and soon have an assassin (Takeshi 'Beat' Kitano) on their trail, picking them off one by one, without pity and without remorse.

From Amazon.co.uk

Takashi Ishii's visually sumptuous gangster movie Gonin ("The Five") is fascinating in its violence, its perversity and its quirkiness, even though its basic plot premise is fairly standard. Disco owner Bandai (Kouichi Sato) owes money to the yakuza boss Ogoshi and decides to rob him rather than pay him--the first part of the film shows him recruiting a crew of the damaged and despairing to help with the job, and disaster follows. Ogoshi hires the more or less unstoppable one-eyed hit man Kyoya ("Beat" Takeshi) and everyone ends up dead--robbers, gangsters and assassins--in an escalating sequence of reprisals. What is different about the film is the odd tangents the plot shoots off at--the sudden sexual attraction between Bandai and the con-man Mitsuya, the truth about the phone calls the desperate sacked salary man Ogiwara keeps making to his family--and its strong visual style. Crucial events take place in the background of shots, the sudden shift from neon-lit back al! leys to sunlight in the last sequence hits you like a blow in the face. Terrifying in its casual violence and impressive in its bleak nihilism, Gonin is one of the most interesting genre films of the 1990s.--Roz Kaveney

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By "pottingshed" on 6 May 2003
Format: DVD
The first time I watched this film, when it ended, I immediately watched it again. On my third viewing recently, the plot began to make sense to me. On each viewing I enjoyed it more and took from the film another level of meaning, and I suspect it is good for many more viewings yet.
In Gonin, aka the Five, nothing is quite what it seems. The message seems to be - who deserves one’s loyalty? How can you judge?
Briefly, the plot revolves around the robbery of a Yakuza gang by an unlikely group of five men, and the aftermath. However a few words about some of the main characters may prove more informative on why this film is so special.
The “little man” in the regular suit, who used to be in a secure ordinary job until laid off after 20 years’ faithful, unremarkable service, turns out to be the most aggressive and uncontrolled of the group. He is currently living a lie, pretending each day to commute to work so as not to fail his family. It takes an apparently minor incident to set him on a dangerous, unknown path, but this was the last straw after his humiliation at work. Yet he remains impotent even as he expresses his rage in the fight that he picks - he is easily the loser and spends the rest of the film with a badly injured jaw. When his fists have failed him he resorts to a pathetic cry “I’ll sue you” - but we know that he won’t. He is looking for a life raft to cling on to.
Bandai, the night club owner and central character, appears on the surface to have it all - flash car, flash club, sharp suits - yet he is in the most serious danger and his empire will not survive without him.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By "pottingshed" on 6 May 2003
Format: DVD
The first time I watched this film, when it ended, I immediately watched it again. On my third viewing recently, the plot began to make sense to me. On each viewing I enjoyed it more and took from the film another level of meaning, and I suspect it is good for many more viewings yet.
In Gonin, aka the Five, nothing is quite what it seems. The message seems to be - who deserves one’s loyalty? How can you judge?
Briefly, the plot revolves around the robbery of a Yakuza gang by an unlikely group of five men, and the aftermath. However a few words about some of the main characters may prove more informative on why this film is so special.
The “little man” in the regular suit, who used to be in a secure ordinary job until laid off after 20 years’ faithful, unremarkable service, turns out to be the most aggressive and uncontrolled of the group. He is currently living a lie, pretending each day to commute to work so as not to fail his family. It takes an apparently minor incident to set him on a dangerous, unknown path, but this was the last straw after his humiliation at work. Yet he remains impotent even as he expresses his rage in the fight that he picks - he is easily the loser and spends the rest of the film with a badly injured jaw. When his fists have failed him he resorts to a pathetic cry “I’ll sue you” - but we know that he won’t. He is looking for a life raft to cling on to.
Bandai, the night club owner and central character, appears on the surface to have it all - flash car, flash club, sharp suits - yet he is in the most serious danger and his empire will not survive without him.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Delvis Memphistopheles TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 25 Dec. 2011
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Another bleak amoral tale of a society in desperate financial trouble, and this was in the 90's. Sex Workers from Thailand, corrupt police officers, salary men beyond despair, after losing their job but still pretending they were going into the office, flash singers living a lie beyond their means and a trans-sexual who hates "queers." Then there is the other side, all big men involved in ritual humiliation, hard, tough masculine; without a woman between them. They all epitomise a hard on sexuality, where as we learn, male rape is a norm within a credo of power.

The story is the standard revenge yarn, but this is Japan, it twists, turns and bites back like no western bleary eyed, "love me" fable. This is Nipon, harsh uncompromising nihilism, echoing the grey skies and torrential rain, lightening the pallor of the compressed cities. When the neon lights, like a pair of red ruby painted lips, light up the face with tantalising dreams in the night, they disappears in the morning, as the wallet pays for the fuller reality.

Dreams of something beyond what is being offered, are what hold these men together. The belief in a better life, makes the russian roulette gamble seem duly appropriate. Life and happiness, is a mirage, this seems to be the underlying message. The connections between the men echo the message as it ripples out between them. They are all enmeshed in a hyper masculine gay world of minimal emotional connection.

Shot in the outer worlds of sumptuous night clubs, docks and garages of gangsta land, this has a high body blood count. It has no same sex buddy message, except for some brief male love moments, whilst meanwhile the connection between sex working and dreams of escape, linger. It has no inter racial bonds.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   



Feedback