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Gone Fishin': An Easy Rawlins Novel (Easy Rawlins Mysteries) [Paperback]

Walter Mosley
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)

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Book Description

25 Jan 1999 Easy Rawlins Mysteries
From New York Times bestselling author Walter Mosley comes the sexy, corrosively funny, and gritty novel that begins the saga of Easy Rawlins.

In the beginning, there was Ezekial "Easy" Rawlins and Raymond "Mouse" Alexander -- two young men setting out in life, hitting the road in a "borrowed" Ford heading for Pariah, Texas. The volatile Mouse wants to retrieve money from his stepfather so he can marry his EttaMae. But on their steamy bayou excursion, Mouse will choose murder as a way out, while Easy's past liaison with EttaMae floats ominously in his memory. Easy and Mouse are coming of age -- and everything they ever knew about friendship and about themselves is coming apart at the seams.



Product details

  • Paperback: 244 pages
  • Publisher: Pocket Books; Reprint edition (25 Jan 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0671027468
  • ISBN-13: 978-0671027469
  • Product Dimensions: 20.8 x 13.5 x 1.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)

More About the Author

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Review

"Playboy" As [: Easy and Mouse] take the car trip to hell, youll want to be riding shotgun. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Walter Mosley is the author of over twenty critically acclaimed books and his work has been translated into twenty-one languages. His popular mystery series featuring Easy Rawlins began with Devil in a Blue Dress in 1990, which was later made into a film starring Denzel Washington. Born and raised in Los Angeles, he now lives in New York. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
4.5 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A New Genre for Walter Mosley 28 May 2004
By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAME TOP 500 REVIEWER VINE VOICE
Format:Hardcover
Great detective story writers can rise to being solid novelists. Ross MacDonald was clearly in this category. With Gone Fishin', Walter Mosley has attained that distinction in a new way -- he has gone into a new fictional genre.
Although this novel has the usual crime overlay, it is really a novel about coming of age in the South as a black person before the days of integration progress. With few books available on this subject, I suspect that Mosley may have set the standard for other authors to meet.
For me, a lot of the charm of the Easy Rawlins stories is their historical setting in the more prejudiced days of the past. How does an intelligent, honorable black person deal with this? The stories are interesting for both what they say about society and for the great plots and character development.
This book, a prequel to the others in the series, does the same, but in a different setting -- far a way from Southern California.
I found it to be an excellent gothic novel, and encourage you to read it as such. If you open this book expecting another Easy Rawlins detective story, you may be disappointed. On the other hand, if you leave yourself open to what you find here, you will probably be rewarded. Moseley's fans need to live up to his talent, and follow him where his skills take him.
If you have not read the Walter Mosley books before, I suggest you start with this one. You'll make more sense out of the rest of the series. You'll also be less likely to be disturbed by the shift in genre. Anyone who enjoys this book will find the detective novels to be an easy follow on.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars blue bayou 22 Aug 2003
Format:Paperback
I don`t know how Mr Mosley does it. This - the very first book Mosley wrote, and the first Easy Rawlins novel, though published only recently - sets the scene for the later novels in the series. Easy is only 19 when he and the volatile Raymond `Mouse` Alexander take a trip from Houston to Pariah, Texas. Mouse wants to claim some money from his stepfather, a nasty piece of work who lives deep in bayou country.
Every word of this brief, perfect novel sears into the brain so you hardly realise you`re reading and not actually there. One whole chapter is a recreation of a downhome black church meeting, with some of the most righteous writing you`ll ever read.
The heavens bless Walter Mosley. May he write what he wants, when he wants, and may he win the Nobel prize one day when the committee is less snobbish. There`s no-one like him. Read this. You`ll be sad when it`s over.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars blue bayou 22 Aug 2003
Format:Paperback
I don`t know how Mr Mosley does it. This - the very first book Mosley wrote, and the first Easy Rawlins novel, though published only recently - sets the scene for the later novels in the series. Easy is only 19 when he and the volatile Raymond `Mouse` Alexander take a trip from Houston to Pariah, Texas. Mouse wants to claim some money from his stepfather, a nasty piece of work who lives deep in bayou country. There, he and Easy (who spends half the novel in a fever, having troubled dreams about his father) come across a gamut of deep south characters, mosltly with tarnished hearts of gold. And you will not forget Mama Jo in a hurry, believe me.
Every word of this brief, perfect novel sears into the brain so you hardly realise you`re reading and not actually there. One whole chapter is a recreation of a downhome black church meeting, with some of the most righteous writing you`ll ever read.
The heavens bless Walter Mosley. There`s no-one like him. Read this. You`ll be sad when it`s over.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars So-So Prequel to the Easy Rawlins Series 13 Nov 2004
By A. Ross TOP 500 REVIEWER
Format:Paperback
If you've read the Easy Rawlins series, this prequel novella may come as a bit of a surprise. Set in 1939, when Easy is a naive and somewhat innocent 19, it's the story of him and Mouse taking a little road trip from Houston to the bayou country of Pariah, Texas. Mouse is planning to visit his fearsome stepfather to try and get some money out of him to finance his wedding to Etta-Mae. Easy is enlisted as driver on this enterprise, and the tone turns dark right away, when they pick up a hitchhiking young couple. The man is on the run for having possibly beaten another man to death in a bar fight, and his girl is a sexy little flirt who seems to enjoy having men argue over her. Mouse convinces them to let him help, and you know the only thing that will come of it is sex and violence. Mouse leads them all deep into the back country to stay with a strange old witch-like woman, who mixes them potions and weaves a different kind of magic on Easy. Instead of the straightforward realistic crime story readers of the series might expect, this is an atmospheric and sometimes surreal gothic tale. Even in such a brief story, Mosley manages to cram in a lot of characters with their own stories, but it all boils down to Mouse's quest for a portion of his mother's dowry. Of course, everything climaxes in violence, and this so unsettles Easy that he is spurred to leave Houston and join the Army. It's not so much a coming of age story as a loss of innocence one.
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