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Goldman Sachs: The Culture of Success Paperback – 6 Apr 2000


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Product details

  • Paperback: 512 pages
  • Publisher: Sphere; New Ed edition (6 April 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0751527505
  • ISBN-13: 978-0751527506
  • Product Dimensions: 12.7 x 3.3 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 2.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 209,011 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Amazon Review

Goldman Sachs brings you inside the rarefied boardrooms of one of the most secretive Wall Street banking giants. Begun by a German immigrant in the late 1800s as a small family-run business, Goldman Sachs rose to become the world's top investment bank in the 1990s, even without selling stock to the public. It attracted some of the best talent in the business and cultivated an image of superiority and exclusivity. "The Goldman Sachs mystique was born of secrecy and success. Nothing like it exists on Wall Street," writes the author, Lisa Endlich, a former vice president at the firm. But behind that mystique lie tales of being swindled by British media tycoon Robert Maxwell, multimillion-dollar losses on bad trades and the on-again, off-again attempts to go public. The book begins and ends with the firm's efforts to go public and get greater access to capital. Most other brokerages are already publicly traded, but internecine conflict and financial turmoil always seem to prevent Goldman from joining the action. In September 1998, for instance, Goldman stunned investors when it dropped plans for a stock offering amid a plunge in the market. A management shake-up soon followed. Goldman Sachs is an intriguing history of the company that invented such financial tools as block trading, commercial paper and risk arbitrage. The book can sometimes be critical, but is largely a favourable portrait by a former employee. --Dan Ring, Amazon.com --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

A fine read about the rise and subsequent antics of a major league investment bank. (INDEPENDENT ON SUNDAY)

Thoughtful, vivid and full of enjoyable detail. (SUNDAY TELEGRAPH)

Endlich, a former vice president and trader at the bank is well placed to write a history of the institution whose rise and rise constitutes "one of the greatest financial success stories of the twentieth century." (SUNDAY TIMES)

This will be an absorbing read for anyone into the world of high finance. (IRELAND ON SUNDAY)

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Customer Reviews

2.7 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By ww@postmaster.co.uk on 3 May 2001
Format: Paperback
I don't think anyone will be left guessing that Lisa Endlich was a very satisfied employee of Goldman Sachs! This is certainly not an objective, critical, investigative expose of Goldman. Rather, it is a subjective, friendly account of the company's admittedly very successful growth into one of the world's top investment banks. The "brilliance" of the management, the "skill" of the traders, the "undying devotion" to their customers; the superlatives go on and on. To be fair, given the company's success, the superlatives are not entirely inappropriate. However, some of Goldman's more dubious moments are almost whitewashed over. The Robt Maxwell affair? Poor Goldman was duped. The Ivan Boesky insider trading scandel? Robert Freeman was forced to make a guilty plea, etc. In the final analysis, it is not entirely sycophantic and is worth the read.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 5 May 1999
Format: Hardcover
Unlike Liars Poker (in case anyone thought this might be something similar) this book does not provide a profound, humorous, ironical view of the investment banking industry. One wonders, why on earth did Endlich ever leave the firm? The book looks an application to rejoin! Boring.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Alexander Sokol on 5 Jan. 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Endlich's book chronicles the history of Goldman Sachs from its inception in 1869 until its IPO in 1999. The book is well written, and provides many examples of the deals and concerns going on in an investment bank, and later, trading operation. While the book seems to show the company in an exaggeratedly positive light (for example, Goldman's handling of the 1998 LTCM crisis is portrayed significantly more flatteringly in Endlich's book than for example in "When genius failed" by Lowenstein), it is still instrutive as it explains many parts of a company which undoubtedly is very well run from a purely business focused perspective.
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