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Goldfinder: A True Story of One Man's Discovery of the Ocean's Richest Secrets Hardcover – 1 Jun 1998


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 432 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Ltd (1 Jun. 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0684821478
  • ISBN-13: 978-0684821474
  • Product Dimensions: 23.8 x 16 x 4.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 839,477 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

"Entertaining as armchair adventure, and a useful primer for anyone seeking to find a fortune beneath the waves." -- Kirkus Reviews --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Back Cover

"[An] energetic rags to riches saga. . . . enjoyable."
–Publishers Weekly

Born a penniless Yorkshire lad seemingly destined for the mills, Keith Jessop instead became a salvage diver, becoming the world’s most successful treasure finder through unyielding determination, extraordinary physical prowess, and keen intelligence. Now, with Neil Hanson, the critically acclaimed author of The Custom of the Sea, Jessop tells his marvelous rags–to–riches story and the tremendous saga at its center: his lifelong quest for the warship HMS Edinburgh, sunk in the Arctic Sea with ten tons of Russian gold.

FOLLOW THE JOURNEY: "The gold on that wreck is further away than the surface of the moon. It took the American astronauts two and a quarter days to travel back from the moon; it’ll take seven days in decompression to bring you back just eight hundred feet from the floor of the ocean."

SHARE THE DANGER: "We won’t even be able to go back for the gold if you don’t take maximum care as you work. It’s stored in the bomb room, the most secure part of the ship. . . . If the gold is still there, it’ll be surrounded by unexploded shells, bombs, and ammunition."

DISCOVER THE STAKES: "Like everyone else on the ship, they were working on standard terms of business for treasure divers: ‘No Cure, No Pay.’ They stood to gain tens of thousands of pounds each if we found the gold; if we didn’t, they wouldn’t get a penny." --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


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First Sentence
My lifelong pursuit of riches from the sea began in the least likely of places and I was the least likely of people to end up chasing millions of pounds worth of gold at the bottom of the ocean. Read the first page
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By pek_uk@hotmail.com on 17 July 2001
Format: Paperback
As a diver, I had an immediate interest in the topic of this book and actually found it quite informative as to the ways of serious commercial diving. Keith manages to give a good humoured account of his life and indeed it made me laugh to myself on many occasions, there are some excellent anecdotes in here as well as a detailed and gripping retelling of the salvage of the Edinburgh gold. Some of the underwater potential incidents had me truly sweating with horror. Keith Jessop is a truly awesome fellow and I just hope he has managed to make his fortune with this book too.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By simon gurney HALL OF FAME on 21 Oct. 2002
Format: Paperback
an amazing book, Keith Jessops passion of diving and particuliarly wreck salvage, leave indelible memories.
the books balance is great, enough early details to establish his character, the book really picks up pace with the various wreck salvages leading up to the edinburgh, the background and research is well documented, as are the details of setting up expeditions for locating and then salvaging the wrecks.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By dennis_terry@mailcity.com on 2 Sept. 2000
Format: Paperback
Yup, this book is a pretty good read.
I was in the dive biz for a long time (my wife tells me toooo long), and I bailed out of the offshore scene some 5 years ago. I've got a fair selection of books on Commercial/Offshore Diving and also Salvage Diving and I'm pleased to add Goldfinder to my collection.
I bought the original book on the Edinburgh salvage: "Stalin's Gold" which was an OK read, but after reading it, Mr Jessop didn't come over looking too good ..... and that is an understatement. The writer of that book (a Times' hack called Barry Penrose) clearly had a problem with Mr Jessop, and also some of the divers, and the Ship itself, and the rest of the ship's crew. Not forgetting the sinister Russians etc, etc... and it showed in what he wrote.
Anyone in the dive business at the time of the salvage couldn't help but pick up bits and pieces about this king of salvage ops. It was a really big deal. I knew just three of the dozen or so divers who were involved in the operation, and over 2-3 years following the salvage I got to hear what they had to say about it all. And it was quite a different setup to that written up in "Stalin's Gold".
Reading Keith Jessop's "Goldfinder" was a real pleasure, and sets the record straight on a number of points. Also Keith's earlier career makes for interesting, and occasionally very funny reading. His story-telling ability is a good as it comes when telling "sea-stories" about "the good-old-days" of the diving industry: when the North Sea diving business was very young and new, and every dive job was a bit "hit-and-miss", with work progressing in the usual "making it up as you go along" mode.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 14 Aug. 1999
Format: Hardcover
Keith Jessop started diving in a rock pool in North Yorkshire, and ended up salvaging millions of pounds worth of gold bullion from HMS Edinburgh, sunk during WW2 with 5 tons of Russian gold aboard, to pay the British for armaments. Compelling reading, I was bought it for my birthday without knowing anything about the man or the story, but I still enjoy this excellent book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Izzy Spellman on 8 April 2013
Format: Paperback
This is the moving story of a man who grew up in abject poverty and through sheer, determination overcame all obstacles to become known as "Goldfinder" the most successful treasure diver. But it's much more than an adventure story, the descriptions of his early "belt and braces" days in a second-hand diving suit and using home made equipment including a compressor cobbled together forom his wife's vacuum cleaner and washing machine, and ducking and diving like the Del Boy Trotter of the Deeps are very funny. The story of his recovery of the gold from HMS Edinburgh at the bottom of the Arctic is a gripping as any thriller and there are enough spies and shady characters hovering around to keep the most avid conspiracy theorist happy.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 3 Jan. 1999
Format: Hardcover
Goldfinger is an impressive story which chronicles Keith Jessops experiences over a lifetime of salvage diving. It appeals in one sense because of the diving situations which he seems to regularly get himself into and with which divers can empathise, but on another level it also appeals as a story about 'the boy from a rough neighborhood does good'. His defining goal is to raise HMS Edinburgh which sailed from Russia with over $100 million dollars of Russian gold and was sunk by a German U-boat. Through a series of close scrapes and exceptionally hard graft he gets very close and the end of the story is an interesting, but disappointing one. I am a diving instructor and I loved it. Read it!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Keith on 5 Jan. 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is an excellent book written by a diver with many years of experience diving, sometimes diving in the worst conditions imaginable.

Because Keith is a diver he makes none of the basic technical errors some writers make, which tend to spoil an otherwise good book.

He explains the physics of what happens to the human body when diving, without turning it to a school lesson, and how saturation divers can descend to 250 metres. The chapters on salvaging the gold were fascinating.

His Yorkshiremans sense of humour comes through well.

I hope he writes another book.
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