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Gold Rush Paperback – 5 Jul 2012


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Product details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: HarperSport (5 July 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0007411936
  • ISBN-13: 978-0007411931
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 2.4 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (37 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 205,452 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Michael Johnson, 43, is one of the most pre-eminent athletes of all time. He has four Olympic and nine World Championship gold medals to his name. At the 1996 Atlanta Games, he won both the 200m and 400m (the only athlete in history to do this at the same Games), and his world record for 200m of 19.32 stood for 12 years until Usain Bolt broke it at the Beijing Games of 2008. He still holds the world record for 400m - 43.18 seconds.

Johnson voluntarily returned his 4x400m relay gold medal from the Sydney Games of 2000 after a team-mate admitted taking performance-enhancing drugs earlier in his career.

Following his retirement, Johnson became a sports pundit with the BBC and has since established himself as one of the most popular and renowned sports broadcasters in the UK. The BBC's coverage of Olympic Games and World and European track-and-field Championships is hinged around his contributions.
He writes a regular column for The Times and owns his own sports training facility, the Michael Johnson Performance Centre, in Texas.
In 2002, he was awarded the Television Pundit of the Year Award by the Royal Television Society. He lives in San Francisco, California.

Product Description

Review

“Essential Reading” The Observer

About the Author

Michael Johnson, 43, is one of the most pre-eminent athletes of all time. He has four Olympic and nine World Championship gold medals to his name. At the 1996 Atlanta Games, he won both the 200m and 400m (the only athlete in history to do this at the same Games), and his world record for 200m of 19.32 stood for 12 years until Usain Bolt broke it at the Beijing Games of 2008. He still holds the world record for 400m – 43.18 seconds.
Johnson voluntarily returned his 4x400m relay gold medal from the Sydney Games of 2000 after a team-mate admitted taking performance-enhancing drugs earlier in his career.
Following his retirement, Johnson became a sports pundit with the BBC and has since established himself as one of the most popular and renowned sports broadcasters in the UK. The BBC's coverage of Olympic Games and World and European track-and-field Championships is hinged around his contributions.
He writes a regular column for The Times and owns his own sports training facility, the Michael Johnson Performance Centre, in Texas.
In 2002, he was awarded the Television Pundit of the Year Award by the Royal Television Society.
He lives in San Francisco, California.


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Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By P. T. Harries VINE VOICE on 6 Nov. 2011
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Michael Johnson is one of the greatest Olympian athletes of all time and makes sure that we know it. He talks of his trials & tribulations, his analyses of triumphs & failures, seasons the accounts with interjections from other greats, together with his opinions of them and makes mention of his business developing athletes and sports people generally.

It is interesting, without being exciting. Very like the man himself, when seen on TV commentating on athletics events, his delivery is measured and positive and seldom goes over the top. His fervour is confined to a limited number of topics, which include his hatred of drugs and his amazement at the abilities of Usain Bolt, his successor as the greatest sprinter of all time, while managing to have fun as well!

Mr Johnson has a soft spot for the UK and regards himself as an honorary Brit; which is - to most of us - as nice a compliment as you can get. His book is a very useful technical treatise for any aspiring athlete or administrator; both these categories will find the content fascinating. The reader of (auto)biographies will also enjoy an insight into how those in that elite bracket of athleticism work (and I mean WORK) their way to the top.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By spiderboy on 1 Jan. 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I enjoyed this book but was left with the feeling that, whilst there is no question on Johnson's ability on the track, his writing can seem repetitive. I found this particularly marked during the middle of the book in the chapter about mind games. It is good to know that MJ is as tough in his head as he is on the track, but I don't need reminding throughout the book that his goal is to win. He is one serious dude and it is nice to see that many of the atheletes that MJ respects are British and to read of the back-room tactics that you don't see on the TV or track. Whatever you think about MJ, we need people like him to uphold the values of sport and I take my hat off to him concerning his no tolerance of drugs.

I recommend that you buy it, but skip the winning mantra bits that are ever-present and make it a little tough going (Editor, where were you with your red marker strike-throughs?)
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Quicksilver TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 6 Aug. 2012
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
With Great Britain taking three golds in the Olympic Stadium this weekend, there could hardly have been a better time to be reading Michael Johnson's Gold Rush. As one the greatest Olympians of all time he is ideally placed to offer an insight into what makes an Olympic champion.

The short answer is talent and hard work. For this book Johnson draws on his own experience and interviews with other great Olympic gold medallists. Usain Bolt, Nadia Commenic and Ian Thorpe all contribute, as do British legends Chris Hoy, Steve Redgrave and Rebecca Addlington.

Perhaps the best thing about this book, is that as you read, you can hear Johnson's authoritative baritone telling you his experiences. The calm and unsensational delivery that makes him such an assured pundit on television, sets the tone for the book. Johnson is a man who knows about being an elite athlete.

The book's opening chapters deal mainly with Johnson's early career and the trials and tribulations up until he won double gold in Atlanta. After that he goes on to talk about remaining focused, coping with the pressures of fame and the temptations of performance enhancing substances (and his abhorrence of them).

The book does have a flaw, and it's one that mirrors elite sport. It's repetitive. Much as athlete training consists of endless repeats of training routines, Johnson's book repeats the same mantras over and over again. Focus, strategy, execute, these words turn up again and again. We hear endlessly about Michael's training programmes, and frankly they are only interesting to read about once.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By G. J. Oxley on 16 Nov. 2011
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
If you weren't already aware, the Olympic Games take place in London in 2012. This promises two things in the publishing world: i) there will be the usual rush by publishers to pump out books with an Olympic theme; ii) because they're being held on home soil, multiply the usual number of volumes by three.

This early entry - on what it takes to make an Olympic champion - comes from one of the greatest Olympians of all: Texan, Michael Johnson.

I would contend that Michael Johnson is not only the most articulate and intelligent broadcaster on athletics in the UK, he's the most articulate and intelligent of any sports broadcaster in this country, period. So, then `Gold Rush' should be very good - and indeed, largely it is.

In this book, he shares his own experiences and philosophy on what worked for him - identifying natural ability, hard work, focus, physical conditioning and the right mental attitude among other key factors. Oh, and of course, the help of a great coach. He has also spoken at length to, and supplies quotes from, a dozen other Great Olympians to provide examples on how they achieved greatness. Naturally, as an `adopted Brit' and mindful of his target audience, a good half of these athletes are British.

Much of 'Gold Rush' naturally concentrates on Michael's own brilliant career. He explains how food poisoning cost him the 200m gold medal at the Barcelona Olympics, and gives us the inside story behind THOSE famous gold running spikes. He also mentions that while he was perceived by other athletes and the media as stand-offish, he was merely mentally preparing himself for his races.
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