Customer Reviews

35
4.4 out of 5 stars
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on 7 February 2014
I was hoping for a critical analysis of high performance. Instead, this is a trite, self-help book of anecdotes. For example, what conclusions can a population derive from one anecdote regarding the placebo effect from 1957?

The take-home message of this book could be summarised in a small leaflet, and it's conclusions are in opposition to the success enjoyed by the team GB cycling team. The 'secret of high performance' as it applied to me was, 'you should have started 45 years ago'. Not helpful.

I thought this a waste of time and money.

If you want some genuine insight into some aspects of sports performance, read 'The Sports Gene..' which covers the genetic aspects of sporting excellence in detail and is very good. This book pretty much dismisses genetics altogether.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 1 September 2013
I thoroughly enjoyed this book. At times i thought this could have been said in shorter version.

However, I was intellectually stimulated by the comparisons and his take on what is talent, the 10 000 hour rule and the role of parental push to get over a certain threshold before the athlete really enjoys making the effort required to walk in the company of the best.

As a sport psychology consultant, i am amazed at how elite coaches fluff with words when i ask them what they are looking for in an athlete or what is the talent they require as coach to be confident that their investment will produce desired results. This book reinforced an unsaid opinion. Talent is a construct - a word created to help us say what we cant see and measure. By contrast, for example, the 10 000 hour rule suggests that effort and who wants it more is a more useful and tangible predictor/measure of sporting success.

Lastly, I do not like the rating of "I love it" for material things.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 5 June 2015
Gives some really good anecdotal examples of how we dampen our children's desire, determination and motivations to compete and strive for sporting excellence in what really comes down to the culture and environment that is created at high performance centres compared to the limitations abroad in countries like Russia yet the amount of players they produce in comparison to the UK is astounding. The section looking at the pushy parents was really interesting and truthful as this has become a real topic of scrutiny in recent times and I feel Rasmus provides an excellent yet different perspective on things. The reason why it was just okay was because of the limited depth and detail to the insightful and meaningful deep rooted perspectives that make it less like a novel and more academically rigorous and sound.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 6 August 2013
This book opens your mind. I wish I had been able to read it earlier in life but it's never too late. The insights the author provides into what really makes people succeed in sport, business or other vocations are in themselves extremely motivating. If you have children, are working to coach others or desire to reach your own peak performance you should make this a "must read."
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 27 July 2013
A fascinating investigation of the factors that lead to clusters of world class sporting performance in some small communities. Makes you think about whether and how various factors can be generalised to other areas of activity. Also makes you wonder about the role of parents in supporting / pushing children and whether (or not) raw talent really exists.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 2 April 2015
The subject matter is interesting but the book is uneven. The theories aren't substantiated in a reasoned way. Does having pushy parents really guarantee the success of child sport stars. This is one generalised theory that is identified and then chewed over for quite some time.. Overall the idea whilst good on paper fails to deliver.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 31 January 2015
I have never underlined so much in a book. Rasmus not only relates his own observations of what creates high performance, he also puts it in the context of many other vital pieces of organisational and motivational work. This book is profoundly useful and a superb read. I wish every manager had this book on their shelf.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on 26 April 2014
This is an entertaining book and the author has gone to some effort to spend time in plenty of the global centres that produce world class talent, what he calls his 'gold mines': the Kenyan marathon runners, Ethiopian distance runners, Russian female tennis players, Brazilian soccer players, South Korean golfers and Jamaican sprinters. The premise in a nutshell is that hard work beats any kind of 'natural talent' every time. On the positive side, it throws up some interesting characters and, for anybody involved in talent development and coaching there are some real nuggets of advice in there from some very successful coaches in the gold mines.

HOWEVER, a couple of things bother me about this book. Firstly, the lazy proof-reading; you'll go through chapters where there it a typo nearly every other page, it gives you the feeling that you're reading the homework of a 15 year old kid. Secondly, some of the gold mines get much more air time than others - there is very little about Brazilian footballers apart from a few anecdotal experiences from Ankerson. But lastly, the gold mine that gets the most focus is the Jamaican sprinters who Ankersen fawns over, describing the incredible project in Kingston that has trained complete nobodies into some of the world's most incredible sprinters. Mentioned in the book specifically are:
- Asafa Powell who came from unknown sprinter to set a new world record in 2005 of 9.77 seconds for the 100m.
- Sherone Simpson, relative unknown to the athletics world who 'worked' her way to bronze in the Beijing 2008 Olympics women's 100m.
Actually both of these tested positive for banned substances in 2013, which certainly detracts from the argument that something special is going on at their particular training camp (as long as you don't consider doping 'special'). You might think of this as minor but the development of Asafa Powell in particular is majored on and, for me, it taints the Jamaican sprinters as a gold mine. Usain Bolt doesn't get anywhere near as many mentions as he was always fast - slightly upsetting the argument that, in this discipline anyway, natural talent counts for an awful lot.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 4 March 2014
A great read with interesting stories and relevant facts. The author has gone to great lengths to investigate the reasons behind the success of elite sportsmen and women, and how this same thinking can be applied to improve performance in any walk of life.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 7 January 2013
Powerful, enlightening and motivating.
An easy read that is thought provoking and interesting. A reminder to not overlook the obvious and be mindful of how important environment is in our development and motivation in life.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.