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Gold Against The Soul
 
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Gold Against The Soul

4 Nov. 2002 | Format: MP3

£6.29 (VAT included if applicable)
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
4:52
30
2
3:34
30
3
4:13
30
4
4:09
30
5
4:13
30
6
3:25
30
7
5:02
30
8
4:13
30
9
3:30
30
10
5:34
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 14 Jun. 1993
  • Release Date: 14 Jun. 1993
  • Label: Columbia
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 42:45
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001R6QP64
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (33 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 27,869 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 1 July 2001
Format: Audio CD
As one of the few American fans of the Manics, I can say that I am impressed with this CD. I just bought a used copy of the CD today and have listened to it several times already. Sure, some may argue that it's reminiscent of 80's metal at least on this one (to me that is, specifically Guns N' Roses), but so what? With the loud guitars and drums and even lengthy guitar solos, the Manics sing and play with fierce passion and enthusiasm. It's too bad that Richey's not around to experience the great band they are today. This is the fourth CD I got from them (after buying their last three), and I will be receiving Generation Terrorists in the mail fairly soon! Only The Holy Bible is left. And oh yeah, I'm still trying to find a copy of "The Masses Against The Classes". And I got into the Manics only this year!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 29 Nov. 2000
Format: Audio CD
This, although not criticly aclaimed, is the one of the best Manic's albums, second to Generation Terrorists. It displays musical and lyrical brillance which the later Manics Generation have missed in This is My Truth Tell Me Yours and is evidently more optimisic than The Holy Bible. As an ardent Manic's fan I can obviouisly see that Nicky Wire wrote most of the lyrics on this album and he is trying to use the same quiotic imaigry as Richey but failing. Also, there is added sentimentaity in this album for Cult Of Richey followers because this release features the only Richey guitar part ever recorded (i.e La Tristessa Durea)
Go Buy! You wont be dissapointed
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Format: Audio CD
I'm one of the few Manics fans who loves this album. It's not as brilliant as Generation Terrorists or The Holy Bible but it's my third favourite and compared to many of their later albums, it's definitely one of their strongest. After Generation Terrorists, I think a lot of people were expecting another album that had the same punk vibe as that one. Instead, Gold Against the Soul was a more indie/grunge sounding effort with less political lyrics and more personal songwriting. In my opinion, that only makes it more unique for the band and it was good that they went in a different direction. Opening song 'Sleepflower' starts the album off brilliantly with some memorable guitar melodies from James Dean Bradfield. Single 'From Despair to Where' also showcases his masterful vocals and proves that he's one of the best rock band frontmen. 'La Tristesse Durera' is one of my favourite Manics songs featuring melancholy lyrics from Nicky Wire and more terrific vocals from James. It's also one of only two songs by the band that Richey Edwards played guitar on (the other being 'No Surface All Feeling' from Everything Must Go). The band still retain their punky roots on tracks like 'Nostalgic Pushead' and 'Symphony of Tourette' and the title track closes the album effectively with some powerful guitars with light metal riffing. It's a shame this album is hated on a lot, even the band have disowned it. It's one of my favourite albums of all time and showed the band going in the dark direction that they would emerge with on The Holy Bible.
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Format: Audio CD
Yeah the Manics now say that GATS didn't really work out to their liking, and I'm sure that certain reviewers will agree. I however still enjoy this album even though it is quite maudlin compared to the spraypaint and glitter explosion of Generation Terrorists.

Sleep flower is a GREAT opener and still brims with angst and edginess. The guitar lick in this is great. "From Despair..."is another example. A great hook running through it. The rest of it? Well it's OK. "La Tristessa.." took me by surprise when I first heard it 20 years ago, and even now it still stands out from the rest of their songs. "Yourself" is pure angst however it can generate an uncomfortable knot in your stomach when you begin to start identifying with some of the lyrics in there...Then it finishes and you get "Life becoming a Landslide", which is pure drama and self-pity and slightly tiresome.

"Nostalgic Pus-head" is a dreadful title but an OK tune. "Symphony of Tourette" is lyrically clunky and I'm surprised it passed QC to get on the album to be honest.. Title track "Gold against the Soul" is musically quite interesting, and I quite enjoy it lyrically too even though to this day I couldn't sing the whole thing off by heart.

By and large an enjoyable album although a bit of a mish-mash of themes and music. I hate to say this but it sounds like they were trying to please others rather than themselves. Musically it is more diverse than GT however it gets a bit lost on the way sometimes..Maybe they were frightened of the rising tide of bands like Nirvana, Alice In Chains etc and consciously tried to move away from the polished punk sound of GT.

Fair play to em.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This, along with 'Generation Terrorists' was a tantalising hint at the greatness that would come on the Manic Street Preacher's landmark, career-defining masterpiece, 1994's 'The Holy Bible'. The songs are polished, yet frequently intense.

It has often been said that 'Sleepflower' was the Manics attempt at a grunge song, and if so, it was a very valiant effort, since it sounds very much like a Nirvana song. James vocals appear to have improved drastically since 'Generation Terrorists', whilst the lyrics are radically different to GT, and less political. 'From Despair To Where', follows in the same glossy vein, sounding highly-produced and expensive. Indeed, the Manics did spend a fortune on recording this album, to a ridiculous extent, and this is certainly clear from the production values.

'Scream To A Sigh (La Tristesse Durera)', also sounds quite majestic, with thoughtful subject matter, lamenting over the neglect of war heroes, the title referencing the final line of Van Gogh's suicide note. Chillingly, Richey memorised Van Gogh's suicide note, along with a great many others. 'La Tristesse Durera' also contains some of JDB's finest guitar work to date. Lavish expenditure did create some spectacular results, this song being one of them.

'Yourself' and 'Symphony Of Tourette' have the same grungey feel as 'Sleepflower', the first being a self-loathing diatribe and the latter being a foul-mouthed, violent outburst surrounded by heavy, disjointed guitars and frenetic drums. It is one of the most impressive songs on the album.

'Life Becoming A Landslide' is one of Richey's sadder lyrics, containing the words: "My idea of love comes from, a childhood glimpse of pornography/But there is no true love, just a finely tuned jealousy.
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