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Going Solo Paperback – 2 Feb 2012


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Product details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin; Re-issue edition (2 Feb 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0241955793
  • ISBN-13: 978-0241955796
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 1.6 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (56 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,098,213 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

The son of Norwegian parents, Roald Dahl was born in Wales in 1916 and educated at Repton. He was a fighter pilot for the RAF during World War Two, and it was while writing about his experiences during this time that he started his career as an author.

His fabulously popular children's books are read by children all over the world. Some of his better-known works include James and the Giant Peach, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Fantastic Mr Fox, Matilda, The Witches, and The BFG.

He died in November 1990.

Product Description

Review

His account of life as a fighter pilot in the Western Desert and in Greece has the thrilling intensity and the occasional grotesqueness of his fiction (Sunday Times )

Very nearly as grotesque as his fiction. The same compulsive blend of wide-eyed innocence and fascination with danger and horror (Evening Standard )

A non-stop demonstration of expert raconteurship (The New York Times Book Review )

Book Description

The second instalment about the incredible life of Roald Dahl. An astonishing autobiography brought to life by one of England's leading actors, Ian Holm. It will capture the attention and the imagination of adults and children alike. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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The ship that was carrying me away from England to Africa in the autumn of 1938 was called the SS Mantola. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Chrestomanci VINE VOICE on 15 April 2004
Format: Paperback
I didn’t expect Roald Dahl’s account of life as a fighter pilot to interest me at all, but to my astonishment I found it gripping. It’s a real page-turner; I couldn’t wait to read the next chapter!
As always, his style of writing is a pleasure to read, and although most younger readers prefer his macabre tales of fantasy, this is well worth adding to their Dahl Library.
Both ‘Boy’ and ‘Going Solo’ are the perfect way to introduce the developing younger reader to biographical/true-life stories, rather than remaining forever stuck in the magical realms of fantasy fiction. This book can be equally enjoyed by young and old alike … the sort of book a grandfather and grandson can read together!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mehajabeen Farid on 13 Jan 2008
Format: Paperback
"Going Solo" is a the book which picks up where "Boy" left off with Roald on his way to East Africa to take up a job with the Shell Oil Company in Dar es Salaam. Roald Dahl is in Africa when World War II breaks out and he leaves Shell to join up with the RAF. This book details Dahl's wartime exploits, which include having a luger (a pistol) pointed at his head by the leader of a German convoy, crash-landing in no-man's land (and sustaining injuries that entailed having his nose pulled out and shaped!) and even surviving a direct hit during the Battle of Athens, when he was sufficiently recovered to fly again - this time in Hurricanes. The book features black-and-white photos, as well as maps, telegrams and other memorabilia. It is a fabulous book which is also one of my favourites. I would rate it 100000000000000/ 10. Anyone would love this stunning success.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ms. U. Khan on 28 July 2014
Format: Paperback
So I happened to stumble upon the autobiography 'Going Solo' of the legendary Roald Dahl. (a book that sits in my little sisters library of her growing Dahl collection) those of you who were his avid readers may well know about his adventures and exploits as a fighter pilot, who fought in world war 2 for the British RAF and Navy. He travelled across continents from Africa where he was an employee for shell, to combatant zones Europe and the middle east. Later on he would author many wonderful well known cherished stories such as; Matilda, James and the giant peach, the BFG, Charlie and the chocolate factory (to name just a few) the bulk of which portray spectacularly strong; child characters, challenging authority (dictatorial and bullish) figures.

Anyway going through the contents, my attention straight away drew to the chapter entitled 'Palestine and Syria'. It was fascinating reading about his adventures as a British fighter pilot combating the then 'pro-German', 'Vichy French' who had captured parts of the middle east causing widespread bloodshed and massacres.

But what was particularly interesting was his encounter with a Jewish refugee. He writes about an incident where he had a landing in the city of Haifa (in Palestine (now so-called Israel, which interestingly Roald Dahl didn't mention once, given that this autobiography was written well into his mature age, where the so called state of Israel was well established) This particular refugee came to Palestine from Germany and was comfortably settling onto a cornfield, aligned with fig trees in Palestinian territory, welcomed with open arms by the hospitable Palestinian farmers.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 22 Jun 2002
Format: Paperback
This is a brilliant book. not as good as boy. but still, roald dahl has made an exellent job of writing it. it is all about roald dahls life, when he is in his 20s world war two starts, and he joins the R.A.F, learn about his ftal crash. and many other things.
this book is a BRILLIANT read.
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By Siko on 25 Mar 2010
Format: Paperback
This is a touching, gripping and utterly authentic account of Roald Dahl at war as a fighter pilot in WW2. From a lengthy back catalogue of his highly regarded childrens and short stories, this to me is his finest work.

With a keen eye for character nuances and situations, Dahl brings to life with marvellous skill and flair his short time on a hopelessly outnumbered fighter squadron during the futile defence of Crete. Reading very much like one of his short stories, his detailed descriptions of the absolutely hopeless battle against overwhelming numbers of Germans are simply, unsurpassed. Imagine "First Light" - perhaps the finest memoir of flying in ww2 - but written by Dahl and you get somewhere close to what a fine read this is.

This is a wonderful story,a fine aviation memoir and an excellent account of a largely ignored conflict, combined together it is a first class book that could sit on almost any shelf. Even if you have no interest in flying you would enjoy the story, told as eloquently as ever by Dahl.

Perhaps most tellingly of all, unlike just about any other of my books, I clearly remember where I was when I first read this account, it is that good! Buy and enjoy.
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Format: Hardcover
I enjoyed "Boy" which preceded this one and this is equally as good if not better. The best parts are after he joined the RAF. It's really a miracle that he survived. With very little flying time in a Gladiator he was given the wrong directions to find a airfield and as a result crashed and was seriously injured.
After weeks in hospital back on duty he was given 2 days to teach himself to fly a Hurricane and then ordered to fly to a primitive airstrip in Greece. Fortunately he
made it and was soon in combat against the might of the Luftwaffe. (Perhaps it's being wise after the event but sending RAF units ,and army units for that matter, to Greece seems a crazy idea which resulted in the loss of many brave men and
didn't seriously hurt the Germans). Anyway he was evacuated from Greece, then sent to Haifa to fly against Vichy French forces. Here the effect of the injuries he suffered in the crash of his Gladiator caught up with him and he was invalided home to England. All in all an excellent book - one of the best personal accounts to come out of WW2
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