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Gloriana Mass Market Paperback – 1 Aug 1986


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Mass Market Paperback, 1 Aug 1986
£18.69 £0.01
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


Product details

  • Mass Market Paperback
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0445202718
  • ISBN-13: 978-0445202719
  • Product Dimensions: 17.3 x 10.7 x 2.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 5,959,560 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Book Description

The Michael Moorcock Collection presents for the first time, definitive editions of Michael Moorcock's most influential work, fully revised and updated by the author. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Michael Moorcock (1939-) Michael Moorcock is one of the most important figures in British SF and Fantasy literature. The author of many literary novels and stories in practically every genre, his novels have won and been shortlisted for numerous awards including the Hugo, Nebula, World Fantasy, Whitbread and Guardian Fiction Prize. In 1999, he was given the World Fantasy Life Achievement Award; in 2001, he was inducted into the SF Hall of Fame; and in 2007, he was named a SFWA Grandmaster. Michael Moorcock is also a musician who has performed since the seventies with his own band, the Deep Fix; and, as a member of the prog rock band, Hawkwind, won a gold disc. His tenure as editor of New Worlds magazine in the sixties and seventies is seen as the high watermark of SF editorship in the UK, and was crucial in the development of the SF New Wave. Michael Moorcock's literary creations include Hawkmoon, Corum, Von Bek, Jerry Cornelius and, of course, his most famous character, Elric. He has been compared to, among others, Balzac, Dumas, Dickens, James Joyce, Ian Fleming, J.R.R. Tolkien and Robert E. Howard. Although born in London, he now splits his time between homes in Texas and Paris. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 1 Feb 2001
Format: Paperback
There's a tendency, I think, to take Moorcock for granted because he has produced so much. 'Too much' as people say who mean they can't imagine reading it all. Yet what is unique about Moorcock is not his phenomenal output (Edgar Wallace and Barbara Cartland both easily break his record) but the extraordinary quality most of it retains. When you think of what he has turned out in the past few years, apart from Gloriana, you realise it includes some of the best books you have read in the past couple of decades! This book won the World Fantasy Award when that award was worth winning and it deserves all the awards and praise. Peter Ackroyd was a great enthusiast for the book and his own fiction carries odd echoes of Gloriana, not least a Platonic London and Judge Dee. For me this is the only peer to Peake and it seems to have been dedicated to Peake, so obviously Moorcock was writing a conscious tribute. Quire in his own way is as good and as complex a villain as Steerpike and Gloriana is a wonderful heroine, symbol of Britain (Albion) on one hand and complex, yearning woman on the other. There isn't a character who isn't fully drawn or a scene which doesn't have the richness and atmosphere of an Old Master. This book wasn't originally published in the fantasy genre and I think like Peake and T.H.White it belongs outside the general run. Moorcock's chief influences are German Romantics and French Existentialists, rather than genre writers, and these are enjoyed at their best in this gripping tale of blood, hate and high ideals. This should be the BBC's next epic. It's very sexy, too, in places! Feel the quality, feel the width. This is a gripping tale told on a rich and complex tapestry.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 5 Nov 2001
Format: Paperback
This is top quality stuff. Well up there with Peake, to whom it's dedicated. A queen whose lack of orgasm reflects her failure to find individual identity while she represents the State. Hers is a culture on the edge of enlightenment. Doctor Dee is here, as well as a Platonic London, and many other elements later found in Peter Ackroyd, a great admirer of this novel. It's well up to the best in the series so far, and a long way from Moorcock's hasty sword and sorcery epics.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 7 Sep 2000
Format: Paperback
In a world which might seem to be Elizabethan England the whole country holds it's breath in the hope that Gloriana their Queen will attain fulfillment. Born of rape and murder into a dark world she is the Light and Hope of every subject in the realm. Her wellbeing is the wellbeing of the land. When she encounters Captain Quires it is though she has lost her heart whereas she has lost her health. As she wanes the realm wanes with her. Can Albion be saved from the Queen's malaise? Will Gloriana ever be fulfilled? Dark, hedonistic, fatalistic and maybe even ultimately triumphant, this novel will ensure you are riveted to Moorcock's every word
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 7 July 2001
Format: Paperback
This is dedicated to Mervyn Peake and is in some ways an homage. It rises above its own ambitions to stand as one of the very finest fantasy novels of our time. It won the World Fantasy Award and the John W. Campbell Award, among others, and is everything you could desire in a grown-up fantasy novel -- a rich Jacobean tragi-comedy! Oh, and sexy, too.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By The Pamphleteer on 18 Oct 2008
Format: Paperback
Yet another epic contribution to the world of speculative fiction from the modern master. Although not quite as perfect as some of his other works, this surprises for Moorcock's remarkable aptitude for adopting an entirely fresh voice as well as for his rich eye for story. Here his style pays tribute most obviously to Mervyn Peake, although thankfully somewhat crisper. Gloriana is a fantastic creation, straddling the sexual and the political (as it were), and Captain Quire and the cast of ancient retainers similarly impress.

If there is to be a criticism it is that the pace and thrills sag somewhat towards the middle passages and cannot capture the joy of the opening and closing chapters. But, even here, much is made up for by a particular skill for narrative description and the gentle subversion of well-worn tropes.

Great.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By G Talboys on 20 Oct 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Despite the re-writes, this remains a beautifully realized vision replete with wonderful and believable characters (even the grotesques) that inhabit a universe somewhat at angles to our own and out there on the edge of the multiverse. Moorcock always was an excellent writer, this has to be one of his master works.
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Format: Paperback
When lending somebody a Moorcock book, the first one I turn to is always Gloriana. Why?

Like almost any Moorcock novel it can be read as a high-paced roller-coaster ride jam packed with plot ideas that twist with a life of their own and characters that demand your attention; your sympathy; your concern; your disgust. But the same could be said for Elric (as recently republished in a sumptuous set by Del Rey) or that poor excuse for a human being, Maxim Pyat. So why Gloriana?

Let's start with length. While Pyat's 'Between the Wars' quartet is likely Moorcock's best writing to date, the page count is daunting. Gloriana is that rare thing: a book that is just as long as it needs to be: no more, no less.

Then there's subject matter. Let's face it, regardless of the invention and creativity of Elric, your female friends will give take more than a distasteful glance at the cover of any Elric book before ignoring it (not even those covers of Gould or Picacio for shame!), much as many a lad wouldn't be seen dead holding some pastel chick-lit. While this is surely a weakness in ourselves rather than the books, practicality wins and thus so does Gloriana. Who doesn't want to read of court intrigue vs. personal truth; dastardly deeds vs. romance; nobles' pageantry vs. beggars' opera; revolution; murder; slaughter and redemption?

The story is set in a world dominated by the court of Albion and its Queen, Gloriana. Built from the bones Spencer's Faerie Queen and Peake's Gormenghast, the world of Albion is beautifully realised in its Elizabethan charm, its calm acceptance of 'righteous Empire' and the gritty sordid underbelly that supports these grandiose notions.
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