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Globalisation In World History Paperback – 3 Jan 2002

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Product details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Pimlico (3 Jan. 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0712677402
  • ISBN-13: 978-0712677400
  • Product Dimensions: 15.3 x 2.2 x 23.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 268,063 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description


"By highlighting the role played by non-Western countries it counters the conventional view of globalisation as "the triumph of the West", and sheds valuable light on some of today's problems, not least the unresolved conflicts between ethnic, national and supra-national identity" (Sunday Telegraph)

Book Description

A provocative and illuminating collection of essays that is the first to look at the major theme of globalization from an historical perspective.

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By hj5418 on 21 April 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Bayly's book brings together some of the most able historians of global history in order to explore how conceptions of our world as a whole have changed, and are continuing to change. Not all of the articles are of equal standard, but even the weaker ones provide some fresh insight, not just another summary of existing work.
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This book is stuffed with information and raises a detailed picture of international trade through the ages. Well worth having for any student of trading history or any person actually wanting to make trading connections abroad. Very useful to know what has gone before.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on (beta) 5 reviews
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
an excellent and timely book 12 Jun. 2009
By Silvester Percival - Published on
Format: Paperback
[...]. GLOBALIZATION IN WORLD HISTORY is an excellent book and, contrary to what some reviewers suggest, is one of the best historical studies of globalization available.

The true significance of GLOBALIZATION IN WORLD HISTORY is that it was the first attempt by historians to bring a broader and longer perspective to the history of globalization. A.G. Hopkins, the editor, begins the book by underlining the growing urgency of the question of globalization, which has been made plain by terrorist attacks around the world, by conflict in the Middle East, and by the changes caused by expanding global trade. Such a pressing issue thus demands a thoughtful analysis. But scholarship on globalization has been dominated by economists, journalists, and political commentators who are primarily concerned with present events, while existing historical commentary has largely failed to approach the history of globalization with a sufficiently broad perspective. The authors of the nine essays that constitute this book seek to correct this gap in knowledge by emphasizing the non-Western origins of globalization and by expanding its inquiry to cover the last 300 years. The hope of the editor is "to reinvigorate the appraisal of large slices of the past," and "to link history to the present in ways that ought to inform the appraisal of contemporary issues".

It is therefore misleading, indeed unfair, to call this book an "academic indictment of American scholars," as Mr. finconsult has - a gross exaggeration that suggests he never made it past the second chapter. Mr. finconsult, as a former Oxford student, should understand that where there is a scholarly imbalance, a corrective is necessary. GLOBALIZATION IN WORLD HISTORY attempts to provide this balance by emphasizing the non-Western as well as the Western sources of globalization, and by searching for earlier sources of globalization that, prior to 1945, had begun the process that since then has become associated with American preeminence.

It is also strange that Mr. finconsult should accuse the book of lacking an economic dimension when the editor, A.G. Hopkins, is the author of AN ECONOMIC HISTORY OF WEST AFRICA, a book that pioneered the study of economic history in the under-developed world, and when the same editor is the author of BRITISH IMPERIALISM, 1688-2000, a book of enormous importance that, more than any other work, returned economic considerations to the forefront of imperial history.

Mr. finconsult also missed the many references to economics in the individual essays in the book. The third chapter by C.A. Bayly concludes that, "already, in the period 1750-1850, features of proto-globalization based on the supremacy of market-driven, profit-maximizing forces emanating from Euro-American capitalism and the nation state were already apparent" (if resisted by old social and cultural formations). Similar developments are suggested in the fourth chapter, by Amira Bennison, who argues that "international economic exchanges, migrations, and global ideologies within and without state structures are not the sole preserve of late twentieth century or early twenty-first-century Western societies but have been developed, promoted, and upheld by many world systems which, although not necessarily global in reach, certainly maintained universal, and thus global, aspirations." Or, take for example the fifth chapter by Richard Drayton, which considers New World sugar plantations as part of the "cutting edge of capitalist civilization," and as a "complex" that attracted investment, employed labor, created consumption, and "generated global circuits of bullion, sugar, cotton, wheat, beef, and debt, and cycles of colonial expansion and European settlement on every continent." These examples could be repeated for the remaining six chapters, but the point is clear enough: GLOBALIZATION IN WORLD HISTORY is a remarkably rich and well-balanced account of the history of globalization that, far from discounting economic forces, in fact places them center stage.

It is equally curious that one would accuse the authors of attacking either the United States or American scholarship on globalization, when the final chapter by David Reynolds begins with an acknowledgement that last century was indeed the "American Century," and that modern technology created a "multiplier effect" that makes American globalization uniquely influential in world history. Reynolds's only hint of challenging American scholarship is to point out that few economists, sociologists, or political scientists have looked beyond WWII, and that "a longer historical perspective is therefore appropriate" if scholars are to understand globalization as more than simply an American phenomenon. "It is a fundamental aim," he writes, "to locate contemporary globalization in broader and longer contexts, by showing the globalizing patterns of other societies and earlier epochs."

Finally, it is regrettable that some readers consider this book an "extremely intellectual" and "impossible" read. There is - inevitably - some truth to the claim that the book is highly intellectual and that its authors write in a distinctive Cambridge style. But this should hardly be surprising (or difficult) for any reader familiar with the authors' work or with the literature on globalization by scholars from other fields. As a point of comparison, I would suggest reading the commendable, if densely written, work on the subject by Ian Clark, or by David Held and Anthony McGrew, et al. You might then discover that, in content as well as stylistic felicity, GLOBALIZATION IN WORLD HISTORY is a refreshing, timely, and highly important study of the history of globalization.
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Five Stars 28 Oct. 2014
By ROBERT L GARZA - Published on
Format: Paperback
Very good condition
0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
College Text. 24 Aug. 2011
By ABC_Easy_As_123 - Published on
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I did not care for the way this book presented the facts. Just a boring read. I must admit, I bought this book only because it was required for class. But even my professor was not 100% satisfied with this book and this is what he specializes in.
2 of 11 people found the following review helpful
Cambridge University scholars against American interpretation of origins of GLOBALIZATION! 15 Mar. 2008
By - Published on
Format: Paperback
This is a scholarly and academic indictment of American scholars on the origins of GLOBALIZATION. However, their differences with the Americans is useful and enlightening. The Cantabridgians are all historians of reputation and they see the nature of GLOBALIZATION through the lens of classical historical analysis and dismiss economics, technolgy, innovation - - as an American notion and ergo, wrong! (Full disclosure: the author of this review read economics at Oxford with concentration on the international aspects)
2 of 17 people found the following review helpful
Impossible read 28 Dec. 2007
By Debbra Richards - Published on
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It was required text - wish I'd found it used because I will never read it and won't recommend it. Maybe I can sell it at a yard sale to some unsuspecting soul. It's dry and extremely intellectual (disclaimer: I consider myself of above average intelligence and am interested in globalization). There's not an interesting sentence in the book. A total waste of money and I let the instructor know. He only had us read the first chapter anway...a smallish paperback not worth the big bucks it cost.

Debbie, Illinois
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