Trade in Yours
For a 0.25 Gift Card
Trade in
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Tell the Publisher!
Id like to read this book on Kindle

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Global Frequency: Planet Ablaze [Paperback]

Warren Ellis
3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)

Available from these sellers.


Trade In this Item for up to 0.25
Trade in Global Frequency: Planet Ablaze for an Amazon Gift Card of up to 0.25, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more


Product details

  • Paperback: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Wildstorm (Feb 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1401202748
  • ISBN-13: 978-1401202743
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 16.5 x 24.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,021,716 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Sell a Digital Version of This Book in the Kindle Store

If you are a publisher or author and hold the digital rights to a book, you can sell a digital version of it in our Kindle Store. Learn more

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Customer Reviews

3.2 out of 5 stars
3.2 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Shallow "thriller" 6 April 2014
By Sam Quixote TOP 50 REVIEWER
Format:Paperback
The Global Frequency is a secret network of 1001 agents led by the mysterious Miranda Zero who take out apocalyptic threats to the planet. Terrorists with ebola virus bombs, angelic reckonings of remote villages, cyborg experiments turned mass murderers, computer programs that turn people into zombies, and so forth.

Each chapter is drawn by a different artist and features a new catastrophe and a new group of agents, the only constants in the cast being Miranda Zero and Aleph (think Barbara Gordon/ Oracle). And that’s part of the problem why this book doesn’t work - there’s no time to develop characters or plot, you’re just presented with a scenario, usually involving people shouting at one another “We gotta go! Time’s running out! RUN RUN RUN!!!”, and told that there are life or death stakes, end of the world stuff, and that’s it.

We know nothing about the Global Frequency itself, it’s just there, the characters are just there and have been part of the group for years, the villains are just there to serve the purpose of being the villains - everything about the comic is so contrived. It’s the laziest type of storytelling that seems to only serve as a medium for Warren Ellis to throw out some vague ideas and work them out quickly as hypotheticals before moving on to the next shallow “story”.

I understand now where he got the approach for his Secret Avengers run at Marvel with the Global Frequency series - done in one team stories featuring singular art and “exciting” plots - but, like Secret Avengers, Global Frequency feels too rushed and superficial to fully engage me.

It does feature some excellent art from artists like Garry Leach, Glenn Fabry, Steve Dillon, David Lloyd, and Jon Muth though, so there’s that.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Format:Paperback
To me that's the question that this bok answers.
See, there are 1,001 people on the Global Frequency. You may not know who hey are, they may even be as close to you as possible without you even suspecting it.
Then one day, they receive a call and they may end up being mankind's last hope against something so big, secret or fast that there's no other conventional mean of intervention.
A worldwide cadre of super-experts, from sportsmen to physicists, from soldiers to magicians, from astronauts to historians.
There for us when we need them.
Broght together by the mysterious Miranda Zero and coordinated by young genius Aleph, they face suicide cults, ghosts, terrorists, aliens, government plans gone wrong, dangerous cold war sleeping threats.
Warren Ellis took a relatively simple idea (but so was Columbus' legendary egg, after all) and stretches it over 12 self-contained issues, drawn by 12 different artists, detailing 12 different Global Frequency adventures - the first 6 of which are collected here for your reading pleasure.
No wonder this has twice been optoned as a TV series and you should do yourself a favor and hunt down the beautiful leaked pilot of the first, while you're at it.
The stories are mostly fast paced and sometimes really skinned down to the action, but overall you have little atom bombs of information that takes along time to properly sink and digest and thoroughly enjoy. There's really so much here for you to drool over and ponder!
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Fine, but... 10 Aug 2009
Format:Paperback
I've read several Warren Ellis books and while some can be a bit of a challenge they are usually engaging.

I have to confess this proved too difficult to keep up with or care about and so I never put in the time to finish it, finding other comics more attractive.

So not for me, then.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Warren Ellis does it again 18 Jan 2004
Format:Paperback
Warren Ellis has made a good name for himself by writing hard edged, witty satires on the superhero genre while at the same time delivering more thrills than the 'real thing'. In fact he has been so successful at this (often subverting from wihin via X-Men spin offs etc) that 'the real thing' has started to look like something from the mind of Warren Ellis.
In this book, WE uses the device of an 'international rescue' organisation made up of extra-ordinary people but not spandex clad superheroes. These operatives are called upon to deal with weird and dangerous situations (virus bombs, dealing with an escaped bionic man, alien invasions that sort of thing) in creative and normally quite violent ways.
The dialogue is generally sharp and the character sketches are amusingly observed. This is a series not a serial and each episode focusses on different central characters so unlike The Authority or Planetary, there is no character continuity or development. This is an observation rather than a complaint because as far as this book goes, it works fine.
This book contains 6 stories, each illustrated by a different artist, all of whom are top notch. Some like Gary Leach don't publish very often but are worth their weight in gold when they do. Its also interesting to see some Jon J Muth pen and ink work again after such a long time (he is more famous for his painted works eg moon shadow). Also special mention for one of my favourite artists Steve Dillon. Probably most famous for his work with Garth Ennis on Preacher, but my fondest memories are of Laser Eraser and Pressbutton from the Warrior days. Total class.
Anyway, back to this package.
It is rather violent so not suitable for youngsters but otherwise it is;
Well written, has great art and is at a good price.
Buy it.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.4 out of 5 stars  11 reviews
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The return of great single issue stories 24 May 2006
By Steve Fuson - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
In case you haven't read the plot synopsis or the other reviews, here's the deal. The Global Frequency is a worldwide network of experts, geniouses, military and police officers brought together by Miranda Zero to save the world from itself. This is a science fiction comic with wormhole singularities and cyborgs, but there are no superheroes. These people are as ordinary as they can get given the world they live in.

It used to be that stories in comic books were largely confined to a single issue and that multiple issue stories were big events. Now multiple issue stories are the norm, designed to fill out collections.

Instead of breaking new ground, Warren Ellis is taking us back to old ground and reminding us that a good story can be told concisely.

Each issue of Global Frequency is a different story by a different artist. When this is done right it can be excellent, as in the second story in this collection which is illustrated by Glenn Fabry. In it Ellis posits what it would actually take to build a cyborg. Human skin and bones and muscle can't support 2 tons of machinery, so Ellis comes up with a vaguely human looking mass of muscle and machine, and Fabry illustration is beautifully horrific. Unfortunately there's the downside of when an artist and story don't blend. The final story in the collection is illustrated by David Lloyd of V for Vendetta fame. In the story a woman runs across rooftops, leaping from building to building, gymnastically scaling scaling fire escapes and jumping across traffic. It should be thrilling, but only about half of the pictures really have the energy of the story. This was disappointing, especially from such a classic artist.

I felt like there was something lacking in Planetary, especially in the beginning. I didn't see why the main characters mattered. They were window dressing to the story. Any character could have been inserted and the story would have been exactly the same. But here, in Global Frequency, it's quite clear why each operative is selected. Sometimes they're a specialist in the problem, sometimes they just happen to be the person physically closest to the crisis, but whatever the reason the characters in each story is always the right person for the job.

This is a great collection of short stories. The stories are smart and concise, and overall the art is good and right for each story.
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Blatantly Secret 15 Dec 2004
By Joshua Koppel - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
The Global Frequency is an organization of one-thousand specialists headed by Miranda Zero. Their task is to handle threats that conventional forces are unequipped to handle. At first we get the impression that the Frequency is secret when a character remarks that they do exist (like the M&Ms in the Santa commercial). But members of the Frequency can leave their jobs at a moments notice by saying they are on the Frequency as if everyone knows about them.

Specialists are contacted by a special portable phone. They also seem to all have a "special case" that is never explained (although one character is asked if he got weapons from his case). Members are top in their field, whatever it happens to be.

I felt the Frequency was not grounded well enough, like the author wanted to tell the story before working out the details. One-thousand unique agents doesn't seem like it could be terribly effective but it seems that the right agent is always close at hand. There is very little repetition of character (mostly just Miranda Zero and Aleph) but you may spot a cameo or two. Each story is also drawn by a different artist thus weakening the feeling of continuity.

The threats in this volume include a man who is a walking nuclear bomb, a rogue bionic man, a memetic invasion, a cult hostage situation, a town that may have seen an angel, and bioterrorists using ebola. Very interesting stories but I am not sure why the Frequency was needed for the hostage story.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My favorite comic series. 25 Jun 2006
By Andrew - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Global frequency is easily my favorite comic/graphic novel series of all time. I've read all 12 issues and they are pretty amazing. I'm not saying this lightly. I've read most of Alan Moore's stuff, most of Frank Miller's stuff, most things by Bendis, Kirkman and Waid.

This is the only series where I have forced myself to stop reading in mid story because the effect was so powerful.

I guess this stuff isn't for everyone. If you're into series dealing with the "mythology" of superheroes then this might not be for you. However, if you enjoy powerful stories that don't require previous knowledge of existing universes, then this series is for you. Warren Ellis is at the top of his game here. Any fans of William Gibson or Neal Stephenson should love this series as well.

It's really top notch and well worth buying the entire series.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An incredible premise, brilliantly done 4 Aug 2004
By Z. Brock - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
The premise of Global Frequency is of a group of 1001 volunteers who have been tapped for their particular talents to respond to emergancy situations the globe over. They could be anyone from an S&M MIT Physics professor to an ex Army sniper to a helicopter pilot. They're always on call so that whoever is closest to the situation can count on all of their combined experience at any time. The premise is obviously cool, but the real question is whether it can be pulled off. Luckily Warren Ellis whips out his mad comic writing mojo and delivers a stunning series of stories. The artwork is also nothing to scoff at. Overall well worth my money, and quite a bit of fun to boot.
2.0 out of 5 stars Shallow "thriller" 6 April 2014
By Sam Quixote - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
The Global Frequency is a secret network of 1001 agents led by the mysterious Miranda Zero who take out apocalyptic threats to the planet. Terrorists with ebola virus bombs, angelic reckonings of remote villages, cyborg experiments turned mass murderers, computer programs that turn people into zombies, and so forth.

Each chapter is drawn by a different artist and features a new catastrophe and a new group of agents, the only constants in the cast being Miranda Zero and Aleph (think Barbara Gordon/ Oracle). And that’s part of the problem why this book doesn’t work - there’s no time to develop characters or plot, you’re just presented with a scenario, usually involving people shouting at one another “We gotta go! Time’s running out! RUN RUN RUN!!!”, and told that there are life or death stakes, end of the world stuff, and that’s it.

We know nothing about the Global Frequency itself, it’s just there, the characters are just there and have been part of the group for years, the villains are just there to serve the purpose of being the villains - everything about the comic is so contrived. It’s the laziest type of storytelling that seems to only serve as a medium for Warren Ellis to throw out some vague ideas and work them out quickly as hypotheticals before moving on to the next shallow “story”.

I understand now where he got the approach for his Secret Avengers run at Marvel with the Global Frequency series - done in one team stories featuring singular art and “exciting” plots - but, like Secret Avengers, Global Frequency feels too rushed and superficial to fully engage me.

It does feature some excellent art from artists like Garry Leach, Glenn Fabry, Steve Dillon, David Lloyd, and Jon Muth though, so there’s that. But Global Frequency is just mindless, nonstop action - if that sounds good, then you’ll love this book, but I couldn’t care about anything that happened in it. “Half of London’s about to be wiped out!!!”, uh, whatever. “We did it, we saved half of London!!!” - was there ever any doubt? “Now half of Los Angeles is about to be wiped out!!!” etc. etc. Yawn.

Oh and that repeated line - “You’re on the Global Frequency” - is just cheeseballs!
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback